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Vol. IX, No. 1 



April 1, 1911 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY 
BULLETIN 




GRADUATE SCHOOL 

1911 



Entered as second-class matter May 16, 1908, at the postoffice at Bloomington, Indiana, 
under act of Congress of July 16, 1894 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/graduateschool1120indi 



. -a 
Contents 



PAGE. 

Prefatory Note 5 

Officers and Faculty of the Graduate School 7 

General Statement of the Graduate School 9 

Purpose and Administration 9 

Admission 9 

Fees 10 

The Library 10 

Degrees 11 

Master of Arts 11 

Master of Science 12 

Doctor of Philosophy 12 

Application for Degrees 13 

Fellowships 13 

Teaching Fellowships 13 

Donaldson Fellowship in Zoology 14 

Lawrence Fellowship in Astronomy 14 

Fellowships for Graduates of other Indiana Colleges 15 

Special Rule concerning Fellows 15 

University Organizations 16 

The Graduate Club 16 

Sigma Xi 16 

Phi Beta Kappa 16 

Departmental Clubs 16 

Departments and Graduate Courses, 1911-12 17 

Greek 17 

Latin 19 

Romance Languages 20 

German 22 

Comparative Philology 24 

English 25 

History and Political Science 27 

Economics and Social Science 30 

Philosophy 31 

Mathematics 32 

Mechanics and Astronomy 35 

Physics 36 

Chemistry 38 

Geology 40 

Botany 42 

Zoology 43 

Anatomy 45 

Physiology 46 

Pathology 46 

Education 46 

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University Calendar 



SUMMER TERM, 1911 



June 22, Thursday. 
June 23, Friday. 



Aug. 1, Tuesday. 
Aug. 2, Wednesday. 



Sept. 1, Friday. 



Sept. 21, Thursday. 



Registration and enrollment for the 
Summer term. 

Recitations and lectures begin for the 
First half-term. (Instruction five 
days a week.) 

First half-term ends. 

Recitations and lectures begin for Sec- 
ond half-term. (Instruction six days 
a week.) 

Summer term ends. 



FALL TERM, 1911-12 



Sept. 22, Friday. 

Nov. 23 and 24, Thursday and Friday. 

Dec. 15, Friday. 



Registration and enrollment in classes 

for the Fall term. 
Recitations and lectures begin. 
Thanksgiving recess. 
Fall term ends. 



WINTER TERM, 1911-12 



Jan. 

Jan. 
Jan. 
Feb. 
Mar. 



2, Tuesday. 

3, Wednesday. 
20, Saturday. 
22, Thursday. 
22, Friday. 



April 2, Tuesday. 

April 3, Wednesday. 

June 18, Tuesday. 

June 19, Wednesday. 



Registration and enrollment in classes 

for the Winter term. 
Recitations and lectures begin. 
Foundation day. 

Washington's birthday, a holiday. 
Winter term ends. 



SPRING TERM, 1911-12 



Registration and enrollment in classes 

for the Spring term. 
Recitations and lectures begin. 
Spring term ends. 
University Commencement. 



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INDIANA UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



VOL. IX BLOOMINGTON, 1ND , APRIL I, iqii NO. 1 

Entered as second-class matter May 16, 1908, at the postoffice at Bloomington, Indiana, under the 
Act of July 16, ISM. Published from the University office, Bloomington, Indiana, semi-monthly 
April, May, and June, and monthly January, February, March, July, September, and November. 



Prefatory Note 



The Indiana University, situated at Bloomington, Indiana, 
is the State University of Indiana and the head of the public 
school system of the State. It takes its origin from the State Semi- 
nary, which was established by act of the Legislature, approved 
January 20, 1820. In 1828 the title of the Seminary was changed 
by the Legislature to that of the Indiana College ; and in 1838 
the University was given its present name and style. In 1867 
Indiana University became coeducational. 
The University consists at present of — 

The College of Liberal Arts, organized in 1828, 

The School of Law, organized in 1842, re-organized in 1889, 

The School of Medicine, organized in 1903, 

The Graduate School, organized in 1904, 

The School of Education, organized in 1908. 

The first advanced degrees, conferred for graduate work, 
were granted in 1882. During the eighties, well defined regula- 
tions for graduate work and graduate degrees were stated in the 
University catalogue, and a considerable number of graduate 
students were enrolled, especially in the natural sciences. In the 
years 1882 to 1893, inclusive, the University graduated 14 Doc- 
tors of Philosophy, 99 Masters of Arts, and 12 Masters of Science. 
For some years following 1893, however, the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy was not conferred. 

In 1904 there took place a segregation and formal organiza- 
tion of the Graduate School, and in 1908 the office of Dean of 
the Graduate School was created. 



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b INDIANA TJNIVEKSITY 

This number of the Bulletin is devoted to setting forth the 
faeilities for graduate work in the several Deparments of the 
University. Courses intended primarily for graduate students 
in the subject under consideration are described in full. Only 
skeleton announcements are given of courses intended for both 
graduates and undergraduates. For further description of the 
latter courses, see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or 
under that heading in the University catalogue. 

The attention of graduates of other Indiana colleges is in- 
vited to the announcement on a subsequent page of ten fellow- 
ships, recently established by the Board of Trustees, for such 
students. The value of these fellowships is $200 each ; they also 
carry with them exemption from Contingent and Library fees. 
For further information concerning the Graduate School, address, 
The Dean of the Graduate School, 

Bloomington, Indiana. 



Officers and Faculty of the Graduate 

School 



COUNCIL 



Carl H Eigenmann, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology, Dean of the Graduate 
School. 

James Albert Woodburn, Ph.D., Professor of American History and Poli- 
tics. 

Harold Whetstone Johnston, Ph.D., L.H.D., LL.D., Professor of Latin. 

Robert Edward Lyons, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Arthur Lee Foley, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 

Albert Frederick Kuersteiner, Ph.D., Professor of Romance Languages. 

Ulyses Grant Weatherly, Ph.D., Litt.D., Professor of Economics and So- 
cial Science. 

Ernest Hiram Lindley, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy and Psychology. 

Burton Dorr Myers, A.M., M.D., Professor of Auatomy. 

Bert John Vos, Ph.D., Professor of German. 

Edgar Roscoe Cumings, Ph.D., Professor of Geology. 

Elmer Ellsworth Jones, Ph.D., Professor of the History and Philosophy 
of Education. 

Charles Jacob Sembower, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

FACULTY 

William Lowe Bryan, Ph.D., LL.D., President of the University. 

Horace Addison Hoffman, A.M., Professor of Greek. 

James Albert Woodburn, Ph.D., LL.D., Professor of American History 
and Politics. 

Carl H Eigenmann, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology, and Director of the 
Biological Station. 

Harold Whetstone Johnston, Ph.D., L.H.D., LL.D., Professor of Latin. 

Robert Edward Lyons, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Arthur Lee Foley, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 

David Myers Mottier, Ph.D., Professor of Botany. 

Albert Frederick Kuersteiner, Ph.D., Professor of Romance Languages. 

Ulysses Grant Weatherly, Ph.D., Litt.D., Professor of Economics and 
Social Science. 

Ernest Hiram Lindley, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy and Psychology. 

Burton Dorr Myers, A.M., M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

Samuel Bannister Harding, Ph.D., Professor of European History. 

Amos Shartle Hershey, Ph.D., Professor of Political Science and Inter- 
national Law. 

Bi:rt John Vos, Ph.D., Professor of German. 

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O 1XDI AX A UNIVEESITY 

William A Rawles, Ph.D.. Professor of Political Economy. 

Carl Wilhelm Ferdinand Osthaus, A.M., Professor of German. 

Schuyler Colfax Davisson, Sc.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

David Andrew Rothrock, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

William J Moenkhaus, Ph.D., Professor of Physiology. 

Louis Sherman Davis, Ph. D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Warner Fite, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy. 

Will David Howe, Ph.D., Professor of English, 
t Ernest Otto Holland, A.B., Professor of Secondary Education. 

Augustus Grote Pohlman. M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

Henry Rihl Alburger, M.D., Professor of Pathology. 

William Wesley Black, A.M., Professor of Elementary Education. 

Elmer Ellsworth Jones, Ph.D., Professor of the History and Philosophy 
of Education. 

Charles Jacob Sembower, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Edgar Roscoe Cumings, Ph.D., Professor of Geology. 

Walter Albert Jessup, A.M., Professor of School Administration. 

George Davis Morris, A.M., Associate Professor of French. 

Frank William Tilden, A.M., Associate Professor of Greek. 
♦Guido Herman Stempel, A.M., Associate Professor of Comparative Phi- 
lology. 

Charles Alfred Mosemh.ler. A.B., Associate Professor of Romance Lan- 
guages. 

Rolla Roy Ramsey, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics. 

Oliver W Brown, A.M., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Frank Marion Andrews, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Botany. 

Lillian Gay Berry, A.M., Associate Professor of Latin. 

Henry Thew Stephenson, B.S., A.B.. Associate Professor of English. 

Frank Aydelotte, A.M., B.LItu, Associate Professor of English. 

Wilbur Adelman Cog shall, A.M., Associate Professor of Astronomy. 

Ulysses Sherman Hanna, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Joshua William Beede, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Geology. 

Eugene Leser, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of German. 

James M Van Hook, A.M., Assistant Professor of Botany. 

Frank Curry Mathers, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Clarence Earl May, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Melvin Everett Haggerty, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Philosophy, and 
Director of the Psychological Laboratory. 

Fernandus Payne, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

Richard Ashley Rice, A.M., Acting Assistant Professor of English. 

Robert Daniel Oarmichael, Ph.D., Assistanl Professor of Mathematics 



(■Absenl on le ive. 

*Absen1 on leave until August, 1912 



General Statement of the Graduate School 



Purpose and Administration. The Graduate School furnishes 
opporl unities for advanced work leading to careers in higher 
education and in certain lines of investigation. It does not offer 
work leading to professional degrees in Law or in Medicine. 

The work of the School is a direct continuation of that of the 
College of Liberal Arts, and as such is the most advanced work 
in education undertaken by the State. The Graduate School 
stands, therefore, at the head of the University, and is the cul- 
mination of the public school system of the State. 

The school is administered by the Council of the Graduate 
School. It is composed of members of the Faculty representing 
different fields of learning. 

Not all Departments of the University are at present equally 
equipped for extended graduate work. In recognition of this 
fact, the amount and nature of the graduate work offered by the 
different Departments varies. Some Departments offer work 
for the A.M. degree only, while others offer work leading to the 
degree of Ph.D. 

Admission. Students holding a bachelor's degree in Arts or 
Science from Indiana University, or the same degree or its 
equivalent from institutions of equal rank, are admitted to the 
Graduate School on presentation of the proper credentials. Per- 
sons holding the bachelor's degree from institutions whose re- 
quirements are considered to lack a year or more of being the 
equivalent of the A.B. from this institution, are not admitted to 
the Graduate School. They may enter the College of Liberal Arts 
and are referred to the Dean of the College for their standing. 
Holders of the A.B. or its equivalent from institutions whose re- 
quirements lack less than a year of being the equivalent; of the 
A.B. from this institution, may be admitted to the Graduate 
School. In such cases, work in addition to the minimum of forty- 
five hours for the A.M. degree will be demanded. The amount 
will be determined in each case by the Council of the Graduate 
School. 

All graduate students will enroll at the beginning of each 
term, arid those entering regularly organized classes will submit 

2—20924 ,(9) 



10 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

to the same regulations as undergraduate students. Work will 
in many cases be individual and not controlled by a recitation 
schedule. At the time of entrance to the Graduate School the 
student must submit a plan of the entire work he wishes to pre- 
sent for the master's or doctor's degree. This plan must be ap- 
proved by the professor of the major subject and the Dean of the 
Graduate School. 

Fees. Students who are legal residents of the State of In- 
diana are charged a Contingent fee of five dollars a term, and a 
Library fee of one dollar a term. 

These fees cover in part the cost of the physical maintenance 
of the University, and are not applied to the cost of tuition, which 
is provided wholly by the State. 

Students not legal residents of the State of Indiana will be 
charged a Contingent and Library fee amounting to twenty dol- 
lars a term. For each Summer half-term, half the fee will be 
charged. This fee is in lieu of the regular Library and Contin- 
gent fees noted above. 

The Laboratory fees in all courses are uniformly one dollar 
per credit hour. 

The Gymnasium fee, if the work in physical training is taken, 
is one dollar a term. 

An Examination fee of one dollar is charged for each make- 
up or special examination. This fee is paid to the Bursar, and 
his receipt when presented to the proper instructor constitutes 
his authorization for holding the examination. 

The fee for any Degree is five dollars, and must be paid to 
the Bursar at least thirty days before graduation. 

I he Library. The Library of Indiana University at present 
contains eighty thousand catalogued volumes. The selection of 
these book's luis been made by experts Avithin the last twenty-five 
years with a view to facilitating instruction and research. The 
collection is a well-balanced one, and is especially strong in liter- 
ary and scientific periodicals. The list of periodicals received 
and permanently kept on file by the library numbers about four 
hundred, and includes American, English, German, French, and, 
to a less extent, [talian, Spanish, and Swedish publications. The 
library is mad< thoroughly usable by a carefully prepared card 
catalogues, by indexes, and other bibliographical aids. The Li- 
brary force consists of a librarian and twelve assistants, all of 
whom are at the service of any authorized user of the library. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 11 

In the Library building arc seminary rooms tor the Depart- 
ments of History, Economics, English, Philosophy, German, Ro- 
mance Languages, Education, Latin, and Greek. 

In addition to the central library, where the general, literary, 
and historical collections arc housed, there are nine departmental 
collections, of varying sizes, kept in the different University build- 
ings. 

All books, with the exception of periodicals and books re- 
served for reference, may be drawn for home use. Each under- 
graduate student may draw two books for two weeks, with privi- 
lege of renewal, and each graduate student may draw five books 
tor two weeks, with privilege of renewal. 

The Library is open Mondays to Fridays from 7 :45 a.m. to 
10:00 p.m., and Saturdays from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 

DEGREES 

Three advanced degrees, Master of Science, Master of Arts, 
and Doctor of Philosophy, are conferred by the University. 

Master of Arts. The degree of Master of Arts may be con- 
ferred upon Bachelors of Arts of this University, or of any other 
institution of equivalent standing, following a residence at the 
University of a minimum of three full terms and the completion 
of a minimum of forty-five hours of University credit. 

Less than a full term in residence will not be counted toward 
satisfying the residence requirements for the A.M. degree. There 
is no restriction as to the amount of work that may be carried dur- 
ing any term. 

Credits earned in excess of those required for the A.B. or B.S. 
degrees, before the degree is conferred or a certificate of the 
completion of the work for the degree is issued, are not counted 
toward the A.M. degree. 

Thirty of the total of forty-five hours required for the degree 
A.M. must be in one Department, or in closely allied Departments. 
Fifteen hours must be distinctly graduate in character. 

Graduates of this University may be given leave of absence 
for one term of the required year to pursue a specific investi- 
gation. 

The work for the A.M. degree may all be done in Summer 
terms, with the reservation that the student must be in residence 
during three out of four successive Summer terms. Single half- 
terms will not be counted toward the residence requirement. 



12 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

Professional studies are not accepted for the graduate degrees, 

but research work on professional subjects may be accepted at 
the option of the professor in charge of the major subject. 

A thesis is required in all Departments except that of Latin. 

Master of Science. The degree of Master of Science may be 
conferred upon Bachelors of Science of Indiana University under 
the same conditions upon which the degree Master of Arts is 
conferred on Bachelors of Arts. 

Doctor of Philosophy. The degree of Doctor of Philosophy 
may be conferred upon graduates of this University, or of any 
institution of similar character and rank, upon the completion 
of an advanced course of study of not less than three years. 

Each candidate for this degree will select a major subject 
consisting of the work of some one Department or recognized 
subdivision of . a Department; and not less than two minors, at 
least one of which must be in some Department related to, but 
distinct from, that of the major subject. 

The course for the degree will be pursued under the direction 
of a committee consisting of the heads of the Departments in 
which the work is done. Its value will be determined by a final 
examination, and by the presentation of a satisfactory thesis. 
usually embodying original work upon some prescribed or ac- 
cepted subject, and which must always give evidence that the 
candidate is capable of forming an independent judgment upon 
the recent literature of his Department. 

A detailed statement of the work offered for the degree, in- 
dorsed by the professor in charge of the major subject, must be 
submitted to the Council of the Graduate School, not later than 
May 10 of the year in which the candidate presents himself for 
examination. 

On the recommendation of the professor in charge of the ma- 
jor subject, and with the concurrence of the Council of the Grad- 
uate School, part of the three years' study required for this de- 
gree may be spent in residence at other universities. 

The Ihesis of every candidate for the degree of Doctor* of 
Philosophy shall be presented to the Council of tin Graduate 
School on or- before the first day of June of the year- in which 
he proposes to take Hie degree. The Hiesis mnsl be indorsed by 
the head of the Departmenl as being in ils final form, and ready 
for Hie press. If lire candidate is recommended for the degree, 
arrangements mnsl be made to deposit five printed copies of lire 
i In sis in the library. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 13 

Examinations of each candidate for this degree will be con- 
dueled by a committee consisting of all the instructors under 
whom graduate work has been taken, in the presence of such 
members of the Faculty of the school as care to attend. 

At least one year before the final examination the candidate 
shall satisfy the professor in charge of the major subject of his 
ability to use French and German for purposes of investigation. 

Application for Degrees. Application for advanced degrees 
musl be filed with the Dean, at the time of admission to the 
Graduate School. Application for the degree Doctor of Philoso- 
phy must be on file at least one year before the candidate is ad- 
mitted to the examination. 

FELLOWSHIPS 

Teaching Fellowships. A number of teaching fellowships are 
available for graduate students. 

The Teaching Fellows are relieved from all term fees, and 
the fellowship carries with it an honorarium of between $200 
and $500 annually. The highest amount will ordinarily be paid 
only if the incumbent is appointed for a third year. A Teaching 
Fellowship is primarily a recognition of scholarship. Not less 
than two-thirds of each Fellow's time must be devoted to work 
leading to the Doctorate in Philosophy; but he will be required 
also to give a portion of his time to the service of the Depart- 
ment in which he is appointed. 

A Fellow may be appointed for three separate years, but not 
for more. Appointments are for one year, and do not necessarily 
imply a reappointment. 

The following are Teaching Fellows during the year 1910-11 : 

Claude Leigh Clawson, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Mathematics. 

Cora May Doehleman. A.B., Teaching Fellow in German. 

Marion Durbin Ellis, A.M., Teaching Fellow in Zoology. 

Max Mapes Ellis, A.M., Teaching Fellow in Zoology. 

Logan Esarey, A.M., Research Fellow in History. 

Ernest Clyde Fishbaugh, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Pathology. 

Jesse James Galloway, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Geology. 

Mary Theresa Harman. A.B., Teaching Fellow in Zoology. 

John Pardee King, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Philosophy. 

Julian Jacob Kisfr, xV.B., Teaching Fellow in Tnhlic Speaking. 

Irving Stoddard Kull, A.B., Teaching Fellow in History. 

Ira Elver Lee. Teaching Fellow in Chemistry. 

Gertrude Tone McCain. A.B., Teaching Follow in Mathematics. 



14 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

Edward David McDonald, A.B., Teaching Fellow in English. 
John Nathan Martin, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Botany. 
Emery Watkins Montgomery, A.B., Teaching Fellow in History. 
Alpheus Russell Nees, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Chemistry- 
Oliver Ralph Overman. A.B.. Teaching Fellow in Chemistry. 
Charles Elmer Owens, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Botany. 
Darmon Artelle Rhinehart, A.B., reaching Fellow in Anatomy. 
Wilmer Henry Soudf.r, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Physics. 
Claude Earl Sutton, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Botany. 
Charles A Unnewehr. A.B., Teaching Fellow in Physics. 
Thurman William Van Metre, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Economics. 
Joseph Abraham Williams, A.M., Teaching Fellow in Philosophy. 

Donaldson Fellowship in Zoology. The Donaldson Fellow- 
ship in Zoology, of the value of $500', is open to students who are 
in large measure capable of doing independent work in biological 
subjects. The fellowship implies residence for twelve months at 
the cave farm of the University, at Mitchell, Indiana. A certain 
amount of supervising work is required of the incumbent. 

Lawrence Fellowship in Astronomy. The Lawrence Fellow- 
ship of the Department of Mechanics and Astronomy has been 
established by Mr. Percival Lowell, of the Lowell Observatory, 
upon the following terms and conditions : 

1. The fellowship shall be known as the Lawrence Fellow- 
ship, in remembrance of the donor's mother, and is established in 
perpetuity, revocable, however, at any time at the will of the 
founder. 

2. It shall be annually available and shall cover the college 
calendar year, that is, from commencement to commencement of 
the same. 

3. The applicant shall be appointed by the Department, the 
donor reserving the right of final passing upon the suitability of 
the candidate so presented. 

4. The Fellow shall be given time and opportunity for an 
original thesis on some astronomical subject looking to the taking 
of a Master's degree, the nature of which shall be decided by the 
Director and the Fellow. But the Fellow shall be expected to 
give genera] assistance in the observatory's work during the 
period of his fellowship. 

5. The Fellowship will pay $600 and the Fellow's traveling 
expenses to and from Hie Observatory at Flagstaff, Ariz.; and a 
furnished room at the Observatory shall be free to the Fellow's 

US*'. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 15 

Fellowships for Graduates of Other Indiana Colleges. The 
Trustees of Indiana University, at their March meeting, 1910, 
established ten Graduate Fellowships of an annual value of $200 
each, with exemption from term fees, to be held by graduates of 
other colleges in the State. In awarding these fellowships the 
policy will be to assign them to the most promising students, irre- 
spective of the special field of study in which they wish to work 
or the particular institutions from which they come. As between 
cases of equal merit, however, attention will be given to securing 
a distribution of the awards among different departments of 
study and different colleges of the State. 

Applicants for these fellowships should file a full statement of 
their educational history and plans with the Dean of the Gradu- 
ate School. This should contain a statement of the major subject 
which they wish to pursue, and be accompanied by a transcript 
of their college record, and such recommendations from their 
instructors and other evidences of fitness as they can offer. Ap- 
plications will be received up to April 15 of each year. 

The applications will be referred in each case to the Depart- 
ment of the major subject in Indiana University, which will 
decide upon the respective merits of the applicants in that De- 
partment. On the basis of the departmental reports, the Grad- 
uate Council will recommend to the Trustees the most eligible 
candidates for appointment. 

These fellowships are not open to students doing professional 
work in law or in medicine. 

incumbents will not ordinarily be eligible for reappointment, 
but they will be eligible for appointment to teaching fellowships. 

For application blanks, and further information, address the 
Dean of the Graduate School. 

The following are the Fellows for 1910-11, with the Depart- 
ment in which each is working: 
Tomijiro Kochi Economics. 

A.B., University of Waseda, Japan, 1909; Ph.B., Franklin College, 1910. 

Leslie MacDill Mathematics. 

A.B., Hanover College, 1909. 

Hugh McHenhy Marble Chemistry. 

A.B., Hanover College, 1910. 

Special Rule Concerning Fellows. Holders of fellowships are 
not permitted, without the special permission of the Graduate 
Council, to do work for remuneration outside the University. 



IP) INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

UNIVERSITY ORGANIZATIONS 

The Graduate Club. A graduate club was founded in 1910 to 
establish closer relations among the graduate students, and be- 
tween graduate students and the members of the faculty. 
Through the association of its members at the meetings, and the 
close acquaintanceships there gained, the club aims to foster a 
community of spirit and a solidarity of interest. The meetings 
are in part social, and in part devoted to the presentation of 
papers by members of the club, giving the results of some in- 
vestigation carried on by the author. In this way, students in 
the different Departments are made acquainted with the special 
advanced work in various lines of research carried on in the Uni- 
versity. Occasionally addresses will be given by visitors of edu- 
cational prominence. Membership in the club is open to all grad- 
uate students. 

Sigma Xi. Sigma Xi is a somewhat similar organization, es- 
pecially for scientific students. It is a chapter of a national 
scientific fraternity, to which members of the Faculty, graduate 
students, and Seniors may be elected. Its object is to encourage 
investigation in science, pure and applied. 

Phi Beta Kappa. Phi Beta Kappa is a chapter of the oldest 
Greek-letter fraternity, founded in 1776 for "the promotion of 
scholarship and friendship among students and graduates of 
American colleges." It is to-day no longer a secret society, but 
an honor-society, having for its special aim the encouragement of 
liberal culture. At Indiana University, a certain number of Sen- 
iors, not over ten per cent are elected each year, partly at Thanks- 
giving and partly at Commencement, and the membership includes 
also certain members of the Faculty, and a few others chosen di- 
rectly from the ranks of the alumni. The chapter was established 
on Foundation Day, 1911. 

Departmental Clubs. The following Departments have special 
departmental clubs: Geology, Zoology, Physics, Chemistry, His- 
tory, Philosophy, English, Mathematics, German, French, Span- 
ish, and Comparative Philology. Membership in these clubs is 
open to Faculty members of the Department, graduate students, 
and undergraduates. The purpose of the clubs is to discuss 
topics of interest to members, and to promote social intercourse. 



Departments and Graduate Courses of Instruc- 
tion, 1911-1912 



*%In the following list are included many courses which are open alike to graduates and ad- 
vanced underclassmen. Only a skeleton announcement of these is here made; for full description see 
the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under that heading in the University catalogue. Strictly 
graduate courses are described in full. The more elementary courses are not listed here at all. 



DEPARTMENT OF GREEK 

Horace A. Hoffman, Professor. 

Frank W. Tilden, Associate Professor. 

The time that at the present may be profitably devoted to 
graduate work in Greek is one year, leading to the degree of 
A.M. A thesis on some subject connected with the seminary work 
of the year is required for the degree. 

All candidates for A.M., with Greek as major subject, must 
take at least fifteen hours in Latin, in advance of the Latin taken 
in the undergraduate study. 

Courses 9, 12, and 13, or any part of these courses, are also 
open as minors to graduate students who have not already had as 
part of their undergraduate study the work which they take in 
their courses for graduate credit. 

The Department is well equipped for doing satisfactory work 
leading to the degree of Master of Arts. Besides the most impor- 
tant reference books, cyclopedias, dictionaries, lexicons, indexes, 
and standard editions of Greek writers, an effort has been made 
to build up an especially good collection of works treating of 
Euripides, since seminary work is generally given in that author. 
The Department has the chief older editions as well as nearly all 
of the later ones, and many special works bearing on Euripides. 

The Library contains the most important classical journals, 
among them complete sets of 'The American Journal of Philol- 
ogy'; 'The American Journal of Archaeology'; 'The Classical 
Review'; Chicago, Cornell, and Harvard 'Studies'; 'Hermes'; 
'Jahrbucher fur classische Philologie'; 'Mitteilungen d. deutsch. 
arch. Inst, in Athen'; 'Philologus' ; 'Rheinisches Museum'; 'Jour- 
nal of Hellenic Studies'. 



(17) 



18 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

Among the most valuable works in the field of Archaeology 
and Art the following may be named: 'Antike Denkmaler'; 
'Ausgrabungen von Olympia'; 'Carapanos'; 'Dodona' ; Hamdey- 
Bey and Reinaeh's 'Necropole a Sidon'; Homolle's 'Fouilles de 
Delphes'; Ohnefalsch-Richter's 'Cypros, die Bibel und Homer'; 
Overbeck's 'Griechische Kunstmythologie ' ; Stackelberg's 'Die 
Graber der Hellenen'; Fenger's 'Dorische Polychromie' ; and the 
publications of the American and British Schools of Athens, and 
of the Egyptian Exploration Fund. Among the works on In- 
scriptions and Epigraphy the following may be mentioned : ' Cor- 
pus Inscriptionum Graecarum ' ; ' Corpus Inscriptionum Atti- 
carum'; 'Inscr. Graec. Septentrionalis, Italiae, Pelopon., Insula- 
rum, etc.,' 'Die Inschriften von Priene', and the important writ- 
ings of such authorities as Klein, Kretschmer, Meisterhans, etc. 
For palaeography and the study of the papyri, the following are 
accessible: Grenfell, Hunt, Kenyon, Mahaffy, Mayser, Mitteis, 
Thompson and Wilkin. In the important field of vase-painting, 
the Library contains msny valuable works. Among the most 
noteworthy are: Benndorf's 'Griechische und Sicilische Vasen- 
bilder'; Collignon and Rayet's 'Histoire de la Ceramique 
grecque'; Dechelette's 'Les Vases ceramiques ornes de la Gaule 
romaine'; Furtwangler and Loeschke's 'Mykenische Vasen,' and 
'Mykenische Thongefasse' ; Furtwangler and Reichhold's 'Griech- 
ische Vasenmalerei' ; Harrison and McColl's 'Types of Greek 
Vases,' and various books by Gardner, Huddilston, Klein, 
Kretschmer, Murray, Smith and Walters. 

The Department also owns upwards of 700 photographs of 
landscapes, buildings, and works of art in Greece, Italy, and 
Sicily; and has many lantern-slides, busts, casts, a model of the 
Acropolis at Athens, and a series of reproductions of the famous 
Tanagra Figurines. 

Following are tbe courses open to graduate students in the 
Department. The more elementary course's are not here listed; 
For these sec the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under 
that heading in the University catalogue: 

9. Lyric and Dramatic Poetry. Associate Professor Tilden. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, at 9:00. 
12. Philosophical Prose. Professor Hoffman. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 10:00. 
L3« Historical and Rhetorical Prose. Associate Professor Tilden. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. VV. F., at 10:00. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 19 

L5a: Graduate Seminary. Euripides is the author usually studied, but 
other anthers; may be selected. In 1010-11 Plutarch's 'Pericles' 
was made the basis of the work, and the portions of Thucydides 
and other authors bearing on the life and policies of Pericles were 
also studied. Professor Hoffman. 
Fall, Wint or, and Spring terms, W., at hours to be appointed. 

156. Graduate Seminary: Aeschylus. Iu 1010-11 all the plays and frag 
ments were studied, chiefly with a view to the religious and ethical 
ideas of Aeschylus. Associate Professor Tilden. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, F., at hours to be appointed. 



DEPARTMENT OF LATIN 

Harold W. Johnston, Professor. 
Lillian Gay Berry, Associate Professor. 

The graduate courses of the Department are intended to meet 
the wants of those making the teaching of Latin in schools and 
colleges their profession, whether or not they are candidates for 
a degree. The work of the first year (Courses 34 or 33, 41, and 
42) consists chiefly of lectures and recitations. After the first 
3'ear the work is to a great extent individual (Course 50), includ- 
ing, besides wide reading in authors of all periods, the first-hand 
investigation of some subject selected with the approval of the 
Department. 

In the Summer term courses are offered for both graduates 
and undergraduates. The work for the A.M. degree may be 
done in three summers. The undergraduate courses may be 
counted to satisfy the language requirement for graduation in 
other departments, or as elective work, but may not be counted 
for graduation in Latin without the permission of the Department 
obtained in advance. 

If Course 33 is taken in the undergraduate course, Course 31 
should be made a part of the graduate work, and vice versa. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the 
Department. The more elementary courses are not here listed ; 
for these see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under 
that heading in the University catalogue. 

[33. Prose Writers of the Republic. Professor Johnston. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 9:00. 
Courses 33 and 34 are given in alternate years.]. 
Omitted in 1911-12. 
ol. Poets of the Republic. Professor Johnston. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 9:00. 



20 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

41. Topography and Monuments of Ancient Rome. Recitations, lectures. 

and assigned readings. Associate Professor Beery. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, once a week, at an hour to be ar- 
ranged. 

Platner, 'Ancient Rome.' 

Open to graduate students only. 

42. Readings in Latin Literature. The student will be guided and as- 

sisted in reading very considerable portions of those authors nol 
included in other courses, with stress laid upon the subject matter 
rather than upon the language and style. Analysis and summaries 
will be prepared by the student and criticized by the instructor. 
Professor Johnston and Associate Professor Berry. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, once a week, at an hour to be ar- 
ranged. 

Open to graduate students only. 

43. Advanced Composition. This course is intended especially for teach- 

ers, but may be taken by any persons who need practice in writing 
Latin. Professor Johnston arid Mr. Preston. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, once a week, at an hour to be ar- 
ranged. 

Open to graduates and teachers of Latin. 
50. Seminary. The critical study of the text of some standard author, 
with incidental investigation of problems in syntax, style, prosody, 
and so forth. In past years, Caesar. Sallust, Tacitus, and Plautus 
have been made the subjects of similar work. In 1011-12 it is pro- 
posed to make a study of Terence. The student should be provided 
with the critical edition of Umpfenbach and the text editions of 
Dziatzko and Fleckeisen. Professor Johnston. 

Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, M., 2 :00 to 3 :50. 

Open to students who have had one year's graduate work. 

DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES. 

Albert F. Kuersteiner, Professor of Romance Languages. 

George I). Morris, Associate Professor of French. 

Oharles A. Mosemiller, Associate Professor, of Romance Languages. 

The Department of Romance Languages offers one year of 
graduate work, all in French. 

The Library is well equipped with works in French criticism, 
and has a fair selection of works in French literature. It con- 
tains all of the volumes of the 'Grands B&rivains de la France' 
series published so far, and also the following periodica] publiea- 
I ions : 

Archiv nir das Studium <U'i neueren Sprachen und Literaturen. 
Bibliotheu des litterarisehen V< reins in Stuttgart. 
Euphorlon. 

I'nmzosis'lie SliMlien. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 21 

Literaturblatl liir germanische and romanische Philologie. 

Modern Language Notes. 

Modern Language Review. 

Modem Philology. 

Publications of the Modern Language Association of America. 

Revue Bleue. 

Revue de Cours et Conferences. 

Revue des deux Mondes. 

Romania. 

Zeitschrift fur franzosische Sprache und Litteratur. 

Zeitschrift fur romanische Philologie. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the 
Department. The more elementary courses are not here listed; 
for those see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under 
that heading in the University catalogue. 

[7. Seventeenth Century Poetry and Drama. Professor Kuersteinkr. 
Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, M. \V. F., at 9:00.] 
Omitted in 1911-12. 
24. Eighteenth Century Poetry and Drama. Professor Kuersteiner. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 0:00. 
10. Nineteenth Century: The Romantic Period. Associate Professor 
Morris. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 10:00. 
127. Nineteenth Century: The Realistic Period. Associate Professor 
Morris. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms. M. W. F.. at 10:00.] 
Omitted in 1911-12. 
32. Contemporary Fiction. Associate Professor Morris. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 10:00. 
[33. Contemporary Drama. Associate Professor Morris. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 10:00.1 
Omitted in 1911-12. 
2:;. Advanced Composition. Associate Professor Mosemiller. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 2:00. 
[2.S. Senior Composition. Associate Professor Mosemiller. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 3:00.] 
Omitted in 1911-12. 
13. Old French: Reading of texts; study of Old French phonology ami 
morphology; exercises in tracing words from classical and from 
popular Latin to Modern French; brief survey of Old French 
literature. Lectures. Professor Kuersteiner. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 11 :00. 
Paris, 'Extraits de la Chanson de Roland': Suehier, 'Aucassin et 
Nicolete' (French edition) ; Oonstans, 'Chrestomathie de l'ancien 
franc a is' ; Paris-Langlois. •Chrestomathie dn moyen-age'; Paris- 
Langlois, 'Extraits des Chroniqueurs franoais'; Paris, 'La litera- 
ture franeaise an moyen-age'. 
Open to students who have studied French and Latin. 



22 TNDTANA UNIVERSITY 



DEPARTMENT OF GERMAN 

Bert J. Vos, Professor of German. 
Carl W. F. Osthaus, Professor. 
Eugene Leser, Assistant Professor. 

In combination with the Department of Comparative Phi- 
lology, which gives courses in Gothic, Old High German, and Old 
Norse, the Department at present offers about thirty-five hours 
of Graduate work. Students entering upon the graduate study 
of German must previously have completed the courses required 
for a major in the Department, or their equivalent. Courses 27 
and 29 are, however, open to students of other departments than 
German upon the completion of the work of the Junior year. The 
library is well equipped with books for the special study of Clas- 
sical and Nineteenth Century German literature. 

The list of complete sets of periodicals and of current publica- 
tions received includes the following, those marked Avith an 
asterisk representing complete sets : 

Alemannia. 

Allgenieine Zeitrmg. Miinchen. 
*Archiv fur das Stndium der neueren Sprachen and Literaturen. 
*Archiv fur Litteraturgescliichle. 

Archiv for nordisk Filologi. 

*Beitrlige zur Geschichte der deutschen Sprache imd Literatur. 
*Bibliothek des litterarisehen Vereins in Stuttgart. 
*Columbia University Germanic Studies. 

Das Litterarische Echo. 
*Euphorion. 

*Forschungen zur neueren Literaturgescbichte, herausgegeben von F. 
Muncker. 

German-American Annals. 
♦Germanisch-Romanisehe Monatsschrift. 
♦Goethe Jahrbuch. 
♦Indogernianische Forsehungen. 
*Jahrbuch des i'reien deutschen Hochstifts. 
*.Tahrbuch der Grillparzer Gesellschaft. 

Jahrbuch des Vereins fur uiederdeutsche Sprachforschung. 
♦Jahresberiehl fiber die Erscheinungen auf dem Gebiete der Germanischen 

Philologie. 
♦Jahresberichte liir ueuere deutsche Litteraturgeschichte. 
•Journal of English and Germanic Philology. 

Korrespondeuzblatl <l<'s Vereins fiir uiederdeutsche Sprachforschung. 
"Literaturblatl fur germanische und romanische Philologie. 
*Modlera L i nguage Notes. 

Modern Language Review. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL '^5 

♦Modem Philology. 

•Monatshefte Hit* deutsche Sprache und P&dagogik. 

♦Publications of the Modern Language Association of America. 
♦Quellen und Forschungen. 

♦Veroffentlichungen des Schwiibischen Schiller Vereins. 
*Yiorteljahrschrift fiir Litteraturgeschichte. 

Zeitschrift des Allgemeinen deutschen Sprach vereins. 
♦Zeitschrift des Vereins fiir Volkskunde. 

Zeitschrift fiir Biicherfreunde. 
♦Zeitschrift fiir deutsches Altertum. 

Zeitschrift fiir den deutschen Unterricht. 

Zeitschrift fiir deutsche Mundarten. 
♦Zeitschrift fiir deutsche Philologie. 
*Zeitschrift fiir deutsche Wortforschung. 

Zeitschrift fiir die osterreichischen Gymnasien. 
♦Zeitschrift fiir vergleichende Litteraturgeschichte. 

For Gothic and Old High German, see Courses 4 and 9 of the 
Department of Comparative Philology. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the 
Department. The more elementary courses are not here listed; 
for these see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under 
that heading in the University catalogue : 

14. German Usage. Assistant Professor Leser. 

Winter and Spring terms, T. Th., at an hour to be appointed. 

30. Studies in the recent German Drama. Professor Osthaus. 
Fall term, M. W. F., at an hour to be appointed. 

28. Journal Club. This course is introductory to the work of the German 
Seminary. Members make reports upon the contents of current 
numbers of journals devoted to German literature and philology, 
and are trained in the use of important works of reference. Two 
to five hours' credit. Professor Vos. 
Fall term, two hours weekly, at an hour to be appointed. 

22. German Seminary: Kleist. Conducted mainly in German. Two to 
five hours' credit. Professor Yos. 

Winter and Spring terms, two hours weekly, at an hour to be ap- 
pointed. 

Open to students who have completed Course 28. 

[27. Middle High German. Outline of the phonology, accidence and syn- 
tax. Reading of selections from the lyric poets, the popular and 
court epic. Professor Vos. 

Fall and Winter terms, two hours weekly, at an hour to be ap- 
pointed.] 

Omitted in 1911-12. See Course 10 of the Department of Compara- 
tive Philology. 



24 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

21). History of the German Language. The relation - ,' German to other 

Germanic languages; the dialectic divisions of Modern German; 

origins of the literary language; changes since the middle period; 

history of German orthography. Conducted partly in German. 

Professor Vos. 
Spring term, two hours weekly, at an hour to be appointed. 
Behaghel, 'Die deutsche Sprache' ('Das Wissen dor Gegenwart'. 

Rand 54). 



DEPARTMENT OF COMPARATIVE PHILOLOGY 

*Guido II. Stempel, Associate Professor. 

The graduate courses offered below will be extended as re- 
quired. They may be supplemented by certain of the courses 
Listed as undergraduate, as well as by certain courses given in the 
other language Departments and in History, Social Science (An- 
thropology), Philosophy, and English. The time that can profit- 
ably be spent here in graduate study in Philology is at present 
about two years. 

The collection of American, British, and German periodicals 
devoted to Indo-European philology is practically complete. 

The more elementary courses of the Department are not here 
listed; for these see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts. 
or under that heading in the University catalogue. 

[5. Comparative Philology of the Classical Languages. An advanced 

course in the science of language and Indo-European philology. 

Each student will emphasize the particular language in which lie 

has had special training. 
fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 10:00. 
Giles, 'Milium! of Comparative Philology for Classical Students'. 
open (d students who have passed in Courses 2 and 3, and in thirty 

hours of language, and to advanced students in Latin or Greek.] 
Omitted in 1911-12. 
1. Gothic. Grammar and reading: phonology of the early Germanic 

languages. Mr. . 

Fall, Winter and Spring terms, T. Th., al 10:00. 

Wright, 'Primer of the Gothic Language'. 

Open to students who have passed in Course 2 and in thirty hours 

of language, and to others a1 the option of (he instructor. 
Given every third year; see Courses 9 and 10. 



* \liciii on leave until Augui I I L912 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 25 

[9. Old High German. Elements of the grammar, reading of selected 
texts, study of dialectal divergence. The method will be both 
comparative and historical. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, I. Th., at 10:00. 

Wright, 'Old High German Primer'; Braune, 'Althochdeutsche Gram- 
matik'; Braune, 'Althochdeutsches Lesebuch'. 

Open to students on same conditions as Coursed] 

Omitted in 1011 12. Given every third year, following Course 4; see 
Courses I and 10. 
I 10. .Middle High German. (1) Fall term: Elements of the grammar, 
reading of easy texts, and study of the development of the German 
language. ( 2 ) Winter and Spring terms : Nibelungenlied, with 
special study of the popular epic. 

Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 10:00. 

Wright, 'Middle High German Primer'; Paul, 'Mittelhochdeuts.-he 
Grammatik' ; Robertson, 'Der arme Heinrich' ; Zarncke, 'Das Ni- 
belungenlied'. 

Open to students on same conditions as Course 4.] 

Omitted in 11)11-12. Given every third year, following Course 0; see 
Courses 9 and 10. 
[11. Old Norse. Introduction to the language, and the reading of texts 
that throw light upon the popular literature of England and Ger- 
many. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 10:00. 

Sweet, 'Icelandic Primer' ; selected texts. 

Open to students who have passed in fifteen hours of Germanic phi- 
lology and to others at the option of the instructor.] 

Omitted in 1911-12. 
15. Seminary. Some topic in grammatical theory or the development of 
some English usage will be made the basis of study. Mr. -. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, W., 2 :00 to 3 :50. 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

Will D. Howe, Professor of English. 

Charles J. Sembower, Professor of English. 

Henry T. Stephenson, Associate Professor of English. 

Frank Aydelotte, Associate Professor of English. 

Richard A. Rice, Acting Assistant Professor. 

At present, two years may be spent with profit in pursuing 
work leading to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. The Li- 
brary is equipped for research work in several periods, is well 
provided with the principal periodicals, and with the publications 
of most of the learned societies. The instructors of the Depart- 
ment will direct competent advanced students in lines of investi- 
gation and research. 

3—26924 



26 I NO TANA UNIVERSITY 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the 
Department. The more elementary courses are not here listed; 
for these see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under 
that heading in the University catalogue. 

33. Literary Criticism. Professor Sembower, and Associate Professor 
Aydelotte. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, two hours a week. 
35. Composition Seminary. Professor Sembower, and Associate Profes- 
sors Stephenson and Aydelotte. 
[41. The Anglo-Saxon Period.] 

Omitted in 1911-12. 
42. Chaucer. Associate Professor Aydelotte. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, two hours a week. 
[43. The Elizabethan Age (1557-1625).] 
Omitted in 1911-12. 
9. Elizabethan Drama. Associate Professor Stephenson. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, at 10 :00. 
16. Shakspere. Associate Professor Aydelotte. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 10 :00. 

44. The Age of Milton and the Age of Dryden (1625-1700). Professor 

Sembower. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at an hour to be appointed. 

45. The Eighteenth Century (1700-1770). Professor Howe. 
Fall term, daily, at 9:00. 

46. Topics of Romanticism (1770-1832). Assistant Frofessor Rice. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 11 :00. 

47. The Victorian Period (1832-1900). Professor Sembower. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, two hours a week. 

Not more than one-third of the work in English of a candidate 
for the degree of A.M. in English may consist of the courses listed 
above. 

[17. Metrics. A study of modern English meter.] 

Omitted in 1911-12. 
[50. Research Course in Anglo-Saxon Literature. An investigation of 
sources and authorities; reading of Anglo-Saxon literature. Pre- 
requisite, Comparative Philology 2. Five hours of credit may be 
secured in this course each term.] 
Omitted in 1911-12. 
1 51. Research Course in Middle English Literature. Reading of much 
prose, many romances, and souk of the most important poems; 
study of sources and relationship. It is expected that students 
who take this course will be able to rend .Middle English, German, 
and French. Five hours of credit may be secured in (his course 
each term.l 
Omitted in 1911-12. 



GB \DI SlTB school 27 

52. Elizabethan Literature. Studios in (lie various forms of literature of 
the Elizabethan Age; investigation of sources and relationships. 
Tin 1 work may deal either with individual authors or special liter- 
ary forms. A reading knowledge of German and French is re- 
quired. Five hours of credit may he secured in this course each 
term. Associate Professors Stephenson and Aydelotte. 

.":',. Seventeenth Century Literature. A research course in the literature 
from 1625-1700. Reading knowledge of German and French is re- 
quired. Five hours of credit may be secured in this course each 
term. Professor Sem bower. 

54. Eighteenth Century Literature. Studies in one of the fields of litera- 

ture — the poetry, the drama, the essay, or the novel. Reading 
knowledge of German and French is required. Five hours of credit 
may be secured in this course each term. Professor Howe and As- 
sistant Professor Rice. 

55. Research Studies in the Literature of the Nineteenth Century. Dis- 

cussion of the various literary forms and study of the relationship 
between English and contemporary European literature. Reading 
knowledge of German and French is required. Five hours of 
credit may he secured in this course each term. Professors Howe 
and Sembower. 



DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

James A. Woodburn, Professor of American History and Politics. 
Samuel B. Harding, Professor of European History. 
Amos S. Hersiiey. Professor of Political Science. 
Thomas L. Harris, Instructor in History. 
Logan Esarey, Research Fellow. 

The Department is prepared to offer research work leading 
to A.M. and Ph.D. degrees, in the following fields : American 
Colonial History, the American Civil War and Reconstruction, 
English History in the Seventeenth and Nineteenth Centuries, 
the French Revolution, Diplomatic History, Political Philosophy, 
International Law, and the History of Indiana during the Middle 
Period, 1820-1860. In each of these fields good library collections 
are already at hand, to which constant additions are being made. 

The following are among the periodicals and continuation sets 
at the disposal of advanced students of history and political 
science : 

American Historical Association, Annual Reports, 1884- 

American Historical Review, 189G- 

American Journal of International Law, 1907- 

American Magazine of Civics, 1S94-6. 

American Political Science Review, 1905- 

Annales ties Sciences Politiques, 1899- 



28 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

Annals of the American Academy of Politic;)] Science, L890- 

Annuaire Historique, 1819-50. 

Annual Register, 1891-182S. 

Archives Piploinatiques, 1905- 

Caniden Miscellany, 1847- 

Caniden Society Publications, 1888- 

Columbia University Studies in History, Economics, and Public Law. 1891- 

Cyclopedic Review of Current History, 1893-1902. 

DeBow's Review, 1846-68. 

English Historical Review, 1889- 

Historical Manuscripts Commission Reports (({rent Britain), 1870- 

Gulf States Historical Magazine, 1902-04. 

Hansard's Parliamentary Debates, 1812-1807. 

Harvard Historical Studies. 1896- 

Historische Zeitschrift. 1888- 

Iowa Journal of* History and Politics, 1903- 

Johns Hopkins University Studies in History and Political Science, 1883- 

Magazine of American History, 1880-93. 

Niles' Weekly Register, 1811-49. 

Political Science Quarterly, 1886- 

La Revolution Franchise, 1899- 

Revue de Droit International et de Legislation Comparee, 1896- 

Revue Generate de Droit International et de Legislation Comparee, 1896- 

Revue Historique, 1S95- 

Revue Politique et Litteraire : Revue Rleue, 1880- 

Royal Historical Society Transact ions, 3d series, 1907- 

South Atlantic Quarterly, 1903- 

London Times ( weekly ed.) , 1896-7 ; 1901- 

University of Missouri Studies, 1901- 

University of Pennsylvania Publications: Series in Political Economy and 

Public Law, 1889- 
[Jniversity of Wisconsin Bulletin: Economics, Political Science, and His 

tory series, 1894-99. 
Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, 1894- 
William and Alary College Quarterly Historical Magazine. 1902- 
Zeitschrift fiir Vb'lkerrechl und Bundesstaatsrecht, 1906- 

Candidates cor the degree Ph.D.. with History as major sub- 
ject, will be examined on each of the following fields: (1) 
Ancienl History, with emphasis at the option of the candidate in 
either Greek or Roman History ; (2) Mediaeval and Modern ITis- 
tory, with emphasis in either Hie mediseval or the modern field; 
(3) English History, with emphasis either on Hie period before 
[485, or after thai dale; and (4) American History, with chief 
emphasis either on the period before 178*3, or after that date. 
The examination on Hie special field of the thesis will naturally 
!)(■ more searching 1 han elsewhere. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in this 



( ;i; \IHATK SCHOOL 20 

Department. The more elementary courses are not here listed; 
Tor these see the bulletin of the College of Libera] Arts, or under 
thai heading in the University catalogue. 

c>. English History. Professor Harding. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 10:00. 
9. Renaissance and Reformation. Professor Harding. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 9:00. 
22. American Diplomatic History. Mr. Harris. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 8:00. 
23a. Government and Parties of England. Professor Hershey. 

Fall term, M. W. F., at 11 :00. 
236. Government and Parties of Continental Europe. Professor Hershey. 

Winter term. M. W. F., at 11 :00. 
L' 1. History of Political Ideas and Theory of the State. Professor Her- 
shey. 
Spring term. M. W. F., at 11:00. 
[13. France in the Middle Ages. A study of the institutions of medieval 
France, and of the processes whereby the feudal type of society 
was transformed into the modern state. Lectures, collateral read- 
ing, and reports on assigned topics. Professor Harding. 
Fall and Winter terms, T. Th., at 11 :00.] 
Omitted in 1911-12. 
1(5. Historical Method. The principles of historical investigation, with 
some practice in the use of sources and the preparation of papers. 
Professor Harding. 
Spring term, T. Th., at :00. 

Langlois aud Seignobos, 'Introduction to the Study of History'. 
28. American Political Parties. A study of some of the more notable 
leaders and party programs in the political and constitutional 
controversies in the national period of American history. De- 
signed to introduce the student to a first-hand knowledge of the 
materials relating to the leading issues iu our national party de- 
velopment. Professor Wood-burn. 
Fall, Winter and Spring terms, T. Th., at 0:00. 
20. History of [ndiana in the Middle Period of the Nineteenth Century, 
1816-1860. A study of the development of the State, its settlement, 
population, laws, internal improvements, canals, banking system, 
schools, and social life. Mr. Esarey. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 11 :00. 
20a. Seminary in English History. Individual research work, under the 
guidance of the instructor, on some subject connected with modern 
English history. The results of the investigations are presented 
from time to time as reports and are finally embodied in papers in 
form suitable for publication, of which a copy must be left with 
the Seminary. Professor Harding. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms. Hours for individual conference t<- 
be arranged. 



30 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

20c. Seminary in American Constitutional and Political History. In 1910- 
11 the period of the Civil War was studied. Study of the sources, 
reports of investigations, and thesis work. Professor Woodburn. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M., at 4 :00 to 5 :30. 
Open to advanced students and graduates. 
20d. Seminary in International Law and Diplomacy. Research work and 
the special stndy of important topics, more especially of present 
day problems. During recent years such subjects were selected 
as the Alabama Claims, the Panama Affair, the causes of the 
Russo-Japanese War, the 'Open Door' policy in China, and the 
genesis of the Monroe Doctrine. Professor Hershey. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, at hours to be appointed. 



DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS AND SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Ulysses G. Weatherly, Professor of Economics and Social Science. 
William A. Rawles, Professor of Political Economy. 
Clarence J. Foreman, Instructor. 

While the graduate work of the Department is primarily in- 
tended to cover one year and to lead to the Master's degree, it 
may in certain cases be extended to cover the requirements for 
the Doctor's degree. In the following special fields the courses 
of instruction are ample and the research materials adequate : 
Economic History, Economic Theory, Money and Finance, Statis- 
tics and Statistical Method, Historical and Descriptive Sociology, 
Sociological Theory, and Social Technology. 

The Department library is equipped with full sets of the most 
important public documents, both state and national, and has 
complete sets of most of the American, English, French, and Ger- 
man economic periodicals. Advanced students have direct access 
to these materials, and also to the special collections relating to 
charitable and correctional institutions. The Department is 
affiliated with the Charity Organization Society of Indianapolis, 
ami through this means properly qualified students are enabled 
to come into direct contact with the social and economic problems 
of thai city. Constant use is also made of the statistical materials 
in Hie various departments of the State government, and also in 
I he St;i1 e Library. 

The more elementary courses of the Department are not here 
listed ; for- these see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or 
under thai heading in the University catalogue. 
(I. Money, Banking, mid the Money Market. Professor Rawles. 

Pall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 8:00. 
:;. Public Finance. Professor Rawles. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring tonus, M. W. F., :ii, 8:00. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL ; *1 

!). Transportation. Professor Rawles. 

Spring term, M. W. P., at 0:00. 
5, Advanced Political Economy. Mr. Foreman. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring tonus, M. \V. F., at 11:00. 
20a. Descriptive Sociology: Social Origins. Professor Weatherly. 

I mII term, T. Th., at 10:00. 
206. Descriptive Sociology: Domestic institutions. Professor Weatherly. 

Winter term, T. Th.. at 10:00. 
20c. Descriptive Sociology: Demography. Professor Weatherly. 

Spring term, T. Th., at 10:00. 
4a. Social Pathology: Poverty and Charities. Professor Weatherly. 

Fall term, M. W. F., at 10:00. 
4&. Social Pathology : Crime and Penology. Professor Weatherly. 

Winter term. M. W. F., at 10:00. 
4c. Social Pathology: Special problems. Professor Weatherly. 

Spring term, M. W. F., at 10:00. 
10. Socialism and Social Reform. Professor Weatherly. 

Fall term, T. Th., at 11:00. 
la. General Sociology : Social Forces. Professor Weatherly. 

Winter term, T. Th., at 11 :0O. 
lb. General Sociology : Social Efficiency. Professor Weatherly. 

Spring term. T. Th., at 11 :00. 
8. Seminary in Economics and Sociology. Professors Weatherly and 
Rawles, and Mr. Foreman. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, W., 3 :00 to 3 :50. 
Sa. Research. Professors Weatherly and Rawles, and Mr. Foreman. 

Fall, Winter and Spring terms, at hours to be appointed. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY 

Ernest H. Lindley, Professor of Philosophy and Psychology. 
Warner Fite, Professor of Philosophy. 
William L. Bryan, Lecturer on Ethics. 

Melvin E. Haggerty, Assistant Professor and Director of the Psychological 
Laboratory. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the De- 
partment. The more elementary courses are not here listed; for 
these see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under that 
heading in the University catalogue : 

34. Psychological Seminary. Professor Lindley and Assistant Professor 
Haggerty. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, two hours a week. 
[35. Modern Idealism. Professor Fite. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T, Th., at 10:00.| 

Omitted in 1911-12. 



32 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

36. Advanced Logic and Methods of Science. Professor Fite. 

Fall and Winter terms, two hours once a week at a period to be ar- 
ranged. 
5. Advanced Psychology. Professor Lindley or Professor Fite. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, at hours to be arranged. 
[30. Seminary in Philosophy. A course designed to aid advanced stu- 
dents in the investigation cf philosophical problems. The sub- 
ject for 1909-10 was Problems of Contemporary Philosophy. Pro- 
fessor Lindley. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, two hours a week.] 
Omitted in 1911-12. 

7. Comparative Psychology. Assistant Professor Haggerty, 
Fall and Winter terms, M. W. F., at 11 :00. 

8. Psychological Research. Work arranged with individual students. 

Professor Lindley and Assistant Professor Haggerty. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, at hours to be arranged. 



DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

Schuyler C. Davisson, Professor. 
David A. Rothrock, Professor. 
Ulysses S. Hanna, Associate Professor. 
Robert D. Carmichael, Assistant Professor. 

The graduate courses at present offered in the Department 
require three years for their completion, and lead to the A.M. 
and Ph.D. degrees. 

The library of the Department, consisting of about 2,200 
bound volumes, is located in Room 36, Wylie Hall. The library 
is open from 8 :00 a.m. to 10 :00 p.m., for use by students pursuing 
advanced work in mathematics. The collection of mathematical 
books consists of the more important English, French, and Ger- 
man texts, the collected works of Abel, Bernoulli, Cauchy, Cay- 
Icy. Clifford, DeMorgan, Gauss, Jacobi, Lagrange, Lie, Mobius, 
Riemann, Schwartz, Smith, Steiner, and Weierstrass, together 
with the following sets of periodicals: 

Acta Mathematica. Stockholm, Berlin, Paris. L8S2 to date. 

Akademie der Wissenschaften, Sitzungsberichte, Math. — Naturwiss. Klasse. 
Vienna. Current numbers. 

Akademie v.-m Wetenschappen. Verliandelingen. Amsterdam. Current 
numbers. 

Akademie der Wissenschaften, Math. Phys. Klasse. Berlin. Current num- 
bers. 

American Journal <>r Mathematics. Baltimore. 1878 l<> date. 

American Mathematical Monthly. Springfield, Mo. 1884 to (Into. 

Analyst (The). Des Moines, [a. L874-1883. Complete. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 33 

AuiKili di Matematica. Milan. Currenl numbers, 

Annuls of Mat hemal ics. Charlottesville, Ya., and Cambridge, Mass. iss 1 
to date. 

Annates scientific ies de I'ficole Normals Sui)£rieure. Paris. 1864 to date. 

A i-vlii \ der .Mathematik und IMiysik. Leipzig. 1841 to date. 

Arkiv for Mathematik og Naturvidenskab. Christiania. Current numbers 

Aui della Reale Accademia dei Lincei. Rome. Current numbers. 

Bibliotheca Mathematica. Leipzig. Current numbers. 

Bulletin de la SoeiGte" mathSmatique de France. Paris. 1872 to date. 

Bulletin de la Soeieio physico-niathematiquo de Kasan. Kasan. Current 
numbers. 

Bulletin des Sciences niath&natiques. Paris. Current numbers. 

Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society. New York. 1894 to date. 

Bulletin of the New York Mathematical Society. New York. 1891-1894. 
Complete. 

Cambridge Mathematical Journal. Cambridge. 1837-1845. Complete. 

Cambridge and Dublin Mathematical Journal. Cambridge. 1846-1854. 
Complete. 

Educational Times (Mathematical Reprints from the). London. 1863 to 
date. 

Giornale di Matematiche di Battaglini. Naples. 1862 to date. 

II Bulletino di Mateinatico. Bologna. Current numbers. 

Jahrbuch fiber die Fortschritte der Mathematik. Berlin. 1868 to date. 

Jahresbericht der deutschen Mathematiker-Vereinigung. Leipzig. 1892 to 
date. 

Journal de 1'EcoIe Polyfceelinique. Paris. Current numbers. 

Journal de Mathematiques pures et appliquees (Liouville). Paris. 1836 
to date. 

Journal fiir die reine und angewandte Mathematik (Crelle), Berlin. 1826 
to date. 

L'Education Mathematique. Paris. Current numbers. 

LThitermediaire des Mathematiciens. Paris. Current numbers. 

L'Enseignement mathematique. Paris. Current numbers. 

Mathematical Monthly (The). Cambridge, Mass. 1859-1861. Complete. 

Mathematical Magazine. Washington. 1882-1884. 

Mathematical Gazette. London. 1896 to date. 

Mathematical Messenger (The). Ada, Louisiana. 1887-1894. 

Mathematical Review. Worcester. 1896-1897. Complete. 

Mathematical Visitor. Erie, Pa. 1877-1883. Complete. 

Mathematische Annalen. Leipzig. 1869 to date. 

Mathematische und naturwissensehaftiiche Berichte aus Ungarn. Leipzig. 
Current numbers. 

Mathesis. Ghent. 1881 to date. 

.Messenger of Mathematics (The Oxford, Cambridge and Dublin). Cam- 
bridge. 1 862-1 871. Complete. 

Messenger of Mathematics (The). London and Cambridge. 1872 to date. 

Mitteilungen der mathematischeri Gesetlschaft in Hamburg. Leipzig. Cur- 
rent numbers. 

Mouatshefte fiir Mathematik und Physik. Vienna. Current numbers. 



34 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

Nachrichten von der Koniglichen Gesellschaft der Wissenschaften zu Got- 

tingen. Mathematisch-physikalische Klasse. Berlin. 1873 to date. 
Nouvelles Annales de Mathematiques. Paris. Current numbers. 
Nyt Tidsskrift for Matematik. Copenhagen* Current numbers. 

Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society. Edinburgh. 1883 to 
date. 

Proceedings of the London Mathematical Society. London. 1865 to date 

Proceedings of the Mathematical-physical Society of Tokyo. Tokyo. Cur- 
rent numbers. 

Quarterly Journal of Mathematics, Pure and Applied. London. 1857 to 
date. 

Rendiccnti del Circolo Matematico di Palermo. Palermo. 1884 to date. 

Revue de Mathematiques Speciales. Paris. Current numbers. 

Revue Semestrielle des Publications mathematiques. Amsterdam. 1893 
to date. 

Siiehsisehe Gesellschaft der Wissenschaften. Berichte. Math.-Phys. Klasse. 
Leipzig. Current numbers. 

Sitzungsberichte der Berliner mathematischen Gesellschaft. Berlin. Cur- 
rent numbers. 

Transactions of the American Mathematical Society. New York. 1900 to 
date. 

Unterrichtsbliitter fur Mathematik und Naturwissenschaften. Berlin. 
Current numbers. 

Zeitschrift fur Mathematik und Physik. Leipzig. Current numbers. 

Zeitschrift fur mathematischen und naturwissenschaftlichen Unterricht. 
Leipzig. Current numbers. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the 
Department. The more elementary courses are not here listed; 
for these see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under 
that heading in the University catalogue. 

21. Eunctions of a Complex Variable. The fundamental operations, con- 
formal representation, stereographic projection and mapping upon 
the Riemann sphere, many-valued functions, Riemann surfaces. 
Lectures and reports. Six hours' credit. Professor Davisson. 
Two hours a week, throughout the year. 

24. Elliptic Integrals and Elliptic Eunctions. Discussion of elliptic in- 
tegrals of the three kinds; addition theorems, Jacohi's geometrical 
proof of addition theorem; Landen's transformation; applications. 
Four hours' credit. Associate Professor Hanna. 
Fall and Winter terms, two days a week. 

ll Contact Transformations. A study of Lie's 'Beruhrungs-Transfor- 
mationen,' including the geometry of tin plane, the geometry of 
i he line-elements of space, and the theory of Pfaff's and Monge's 
equations. Six hours' credit. Professor R.OTHKOCK. 
Fall and Winter terms, three days a week. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 35 

[Hi). Theory of Surfaces, rjectnres, assigned readings, and reports upon 
tiic genera] theory of surfaces and twisted curves; singularities of 
surfaces, asymptotic curves, lines of curvature, geodesic lines, and 
differential geometry are studied Professor Davisson.] 
Omitted In 1911-1912. 
[45. Calculus of Variations. Professor Rothrock.J 

Omitted in 1911-1912. 
51. Linear Differential Equations. Existence theorems, function-theo- 
retic character of the solutions, special equations, oscillation 
properties, boundary-valve and expansion problems. Lectures and 
reports. Assistant Professor Carmichael. 
Three hours a week, throughout the year. 
[39. Theory of Substitutions and the Galois Theory of Equations. Asso- 
ciate Professor Hanna.1 
Omitted in 1911-19J2. 
20. Mathematical Reading and Research. Professors Davisson and 
Roth rock, Associate Professor Hanna, and Assistant Professor 
Carmichael. 

The reading and research courses will be : 

20a. Topics in the Theory of Functions and those relating to Differential 
Geometry. Professor Davisson. 

20b. Topics in Lie's Theory of Groups. Professor Rothrock. 

20c. Topics in the Theory of Invariants and Covariants. Associate Pro- 
fessor Hanna. 

20d. Functional Equations. A research course on the theory of difference 
;>nd other functional equations. Assistant Professor Carmichael. 



DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICS AND ASTRONOMY 

Wilbur A. Cogshall, Associate Professor of Astronomy. 
Vernon A. Suydam, Instructor in Mechanics. 

Kirkwood Observatory, completed in 1900, is occupied by the 
Department. The building contains a library and computing 
room ; a lecture room ; dark room ; a transit room, in which are a 
Bamberg universal instrument, a Howard sidereal clock, a mean 
time chronometer, and a chronograph ; a dome twenty-six feet in 
diameter; and a room of the same size immediately below. In 
the dome is the refracting telescope, of which the 12-inch ob- 
jective is by Brashear, and the mounting by Warner and Swasey, 
of Cleveland. The instrument has a focal length of about 15 
feet, and is supplied with eyepieces magnifying from 130 to 
nearly 1,000 diameters ; also with polarizing helioscope, diagonal 
eyepiece, and an electrically illuminated micrometer ; there are 



36 INDIANA UNIVEESITY 

both coarse and fine circles in right ascension and declination, the 
fine circles having rending microscope and electrical illumination. 

The Department has in a separate building, a mounting, de- 
signed and built by the Department, that carries a 4-inch Brown- 
ing refractor, a 5-inch portrait lens and an 8-inch parabolic 
mirror, for the photography of comets, nebulce, etc. 

This building contains also a coelostat and horizontal telescope. 
The objective of the telescope has a diameter of 9 inches and a 
focal length of 64 feet. Both the plane of the coelostat and the 
lens are by Petitdidier, of Chicago. 

For an account of the Lawrence Fellowship in Astronomy, see 
page 14. 

The Department receives telegraphic bulletins of discoveries 
made at American and European observatories. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the 
Department. The more elementary courses are not here listed ; 
for these see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under 
that heading in the University catalogue. 

14. Orbits of Spectroscopic Binaries. Associate Professor Cogshall. 
Winter term, T. Th., at 2:00. 

8. Theoretical Mechanics. Air. Suydam. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 9:00. 

15. Celestial Mechanics. An introductory course. Associate Professor 

Cogshall. 

Spring term, M. W. F., at 11 :00. 

Open to students who have passed in Course 7. 
12. Theoretical Astronomy. Integration of equations of motion; com- 
putation of orbits and ephemerides. Associate Professor Cogshall. 

Fall term. Hours and credit to ho arranged with each student. 
1.3. Astronomical Research. A limited number of students will he per- 
mitted to undertake research work under the supervision of the 
Department. The equipment is best suited for work in astronomy 
of precision and celestial photography. Associate Professor 
Cogshall. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms. Hours and credit arranged with 
each stu<l< id. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS 

Abthub L. Foley, Professor of Physics. 

EtOLLA R. RAMSEY, Associate Professor of Physics. 

Tin l)( partmenl offers a Cull course Leading to the degree of 
I'!i. I). 

The supply of apparatus For the presentation of courses in 
modern experimental physics is Fairly complete. The equipment 



GRADUA1 E SCHOOL 37 

.-Hid facilities for work have been largely increased during the 
p$s1 throe years, especially in the way of delicate instruments 
and accurate standards for advanced study. 

Tin' Library of the Department of Physics contains about six 

hundred volumes, exclusive of sets of several journals. The fol- 
lowing magazines are on Hie: 'Annalen der Physik', 'Annales de 
Chimie et de Physique', 'Beiblatter /ai den Annalen der Physik', 
' Physikalische Zeitschrif t ', 'The Electrical World and Engineer', 
'The Electrician' (London), 'Journal de Physique', 'The Philo- 
sophical Magazine', 'The Physical Review', 'The Proceedings of 
the Physical Society of London', 'The Proceedings of the Royal 
Society', 'Le Radium', 'School Science and Mathematics', 'Sci- 
ence Abstracts' (A and B), 'Scientific American and Supple- 
ment', 'The Western Electrician', 'Cassier's Magazine', and 'The 
Manual Training Magazine'. Students have access also to the 
journals on file in the general library, and in the libraries of other 
Departments. Of these may be named: 'The American Journal 
of Science', 'The Astrophysical Journal', 'The Engineering and 
Mining Journal', 'The Engineering Magazine', 'Nature', 
'Comptes Renclus', and 'Science'. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the 
Department. The more elementary courses are not here listed ; 
for these see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under 
that heading in the University catalogue. 

12. The Electromagnetic Theory of Light. Professor Foley. 
Fall, Winter, find Spring terms, T. Th., at 9:00. 

Wood, 'Optics'. 

13. Advanced Mathematical Electricity. Associate Professor Ramsey. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 8 :00. 

Webster, 'Electricity and Magnetism'. 
34. Sound. Mathematical and physical properties of the vibration of 
sound-producing bodies, such as strings, rods, plates, air columns, 
membranes, etc. Assistant Professor Dutcher. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 10 :00. 
16b. Laboratory Practice in Spectroscopy and Photometry- Associate 
Professor Ramsey. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 2:00. 

14. Advanced Laboratory Methods and Research. Professor Foley. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, at 1 :00. 

22. Current Physical Literature. Professor Foi.ey. 

Two hours a week throughout the year, at an hour to be appointed. 
30. Advanced Theoretical Physics. A critical study of standard treatises 
and memoirs. Professor Foley. 

Two hours per week, at a time to be appointed. 



38 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 



DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

Robert E. Lyons, Professor. 

Liouis S. Davis, Professor. 

Oliver W. Brown, Associate Professor. 

Frank C. Mathers, Assistant Professor. 

Clarence E. May, Assistant Professor. 

Alpheus R. Nees, Teaching Fellow. 

The Department of Chemistry has general, special, and private 
laboratories, a laboratory room, a lecture room, balance rooms, 
an incubator room, a stock room, museum, etc. Special labora- 
tories are provided for electrochemistry, assaying and electric 
furnace work, organic, inorganic and physiological chemistry, 
water and gas analysis, spectroscopic analysis. The laboratories 
comprise eleven large, well-lighted rooms, equipped with work- 
stands, capable of accommodating two hundred and seventy-five 
students. Each room is provided with fume hoods and air tight 
registers connected with a ventilating fan for the removal of 
offensive and poisonous gases. 

The general equipment for graduate work, including labora- 
tory and library facilities, has been materially increased during 
the past year. 

Special attention is given to inorganic, organic, physiological, 
and physical chemistry and to electrochemistry, technical analyti- 
cal chemistry, and electro-metallurgy. 

The graduate work of the Department, leading to the degree 
A.M. and Ph.D., comprises advanced laboratory, lecture, library 
and seminary work in the lines indicated above, and special grad- 
uate courses described below. A thesis embodying original in- 
vestigation is required for an advanced degree. 

The laboratories for advanced work and the departmental 
library are open from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. There are no classes 
in the laboratories; each student works independently. A five- 
hour laboratory course requires two and one-half actual hours 
of laboratory work daily. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in this 

Department. The more elementary courses are not here listed; 

for these sec the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under 

thai heading in the University catalogue. 

1'.). Physical Chemistry. Laboratory work. Associate Professor Brown. 

2*2. Electrochemistry. Associate Professor Brown and Mr. Nees. 

Winter berm. A. Lectures, T. Hi., ;il 8:00. R. Laboratory, M. \Y. 
!■'., 1 :00 to 4 :. r >0. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 39 

I':;. Electrochemistry, Associate Professor Brown and Mr. Nees. 

Spring Lenn. A. Lectures, T. Th., at 8:00. B. Laboratory, M. W. 
F., 1 :00 to I :50. 

29. Storage Batteries. Lectures and laboratory work. Associate Pro- 
fessor Brown and Mr. Nees. 
Pall term. 

13. Elementary Metallurgy and Assaying. Lectures and laboratory work. 

Associate Professor Brown and Mr. Nees. 
Pall term. Lectures, T. Th., at 8:00; laboratory work, P. S., 8:00 to 
11 :50. 

15. Advanced Technical and Engineering Analysis. Laboratory work. 
Assist:! nt Professor Matheus. 
Spring term, daily. 

32. Gas and Fuel Analysis. Lectures and laboratory work. Assistant 

Professor Mathers. 
Winter term, three hours a week. 

33. Spectrum Analysis and Sugar Analysis. Lectures and laboratory 

work. Assistant Professor Mathers. 
Fall term, two hours a week. 
2<j. Chemical Engineering. Associate Professor Brown. 
Fall term. Lectures, M. W. P., at 8 :00. 

14. Seminary. Reports on current literature and special topics. (1) 

Fall term : Inorganic Chemistry. Assistant Professor Mathers. 
(2) Winter term: Organic Chemistry. Professor Lyons and As- 
sistant Professor May. (3) Spring term: Electrochemistry and 
Industrial Chemistry. Associate Professor Brown and Assistant 
Professor May. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, Th., at 7:00 p.m. 

12(/. Research in Organic or Physiological Chemistry. Professor Lyons 
and Assistant Professor May. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 8 :00 to 5 :00. 
12&. Research in the Chemistry of the Alkaloids. Professor Davis. 

Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 8:00 to 5:00. 

12c. Research in Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry. Associate 
Professor Brown. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 8:00 to 5:00. 
12cZ. Research in Inorganic Chemistry. Assistant Professor Mathers. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 8 :00 to 5 :00. 

18c. Advanced Physical Chemistry. Lectures on selected chapters of 
Physical Chemistry. Associate Professor Brown. 
Spring term, T. Th., at an hour to be arranged. 



40 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

24. Advanced Electrochemistry and Electro-Metallurgy. (A) Advanced 
laboratory work and research in pure and applied electrochemistry 
and electro-metallurgy, including investigations in electric furnace 
work, refining and extraction of metals, electro-synthesis of or- 
ganic and inorganic compounds, manufacture of storage batteries 
and of industrial electrochemical processes. ( H ) Lectures on the 
design and operation of commercial electric furnaces and on elec- 
tric furnace processes and products. Associate Professor Bbown 
and Air. Nees. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms. Laboratory work, daily. 8:00 to 
4:50; lectures. Winter term, P., at 8:00. 

Students in this course are recommended to take Physics 10 and 24. 
'2'). Advanced Organic Chemistry. A continuation of Course G. (A) 
Lectures and recitations on selected chapters of organic chemistry. 
The topics considered in 1910 were: (a) The radical, (b) benzene 
nucleus, (c) stereoisomerism of carbon, (d) sugars, purine, pro- 
teins, terpenes and alkaloids. (13) Laboratory work or research 
in synthetic or analytical organic chemistry. Assistant Professor 
May. 

(A) Winter and Spring terms, T. Tin, 11 :00. (B) Fall, Winter, and 
Spring terms, daily, 8:00 to 4:50. 

Cohen, 'Text Book of Organic Chemistry'; Roscoe and Schorlemer, 
'Treatise on Chemistry'; Hammerstein, 'Physiological Chemistry'; 
Hensler-Pond, 'Terpenes'. 

Presupposes Courses 6 1 , <r, 7. 
31. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. Laboratory work. The preparation 
and study of the properties and reactions of the different com- 
pounds of the rare and uncommon elements, followed by research. 
This includes a review of the literature relating to the element 
that is being studied. Assistant Professor Mathers. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. P., 8:00 to 4:50. 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY 

Edgak R. Cumings, Professor. 

Joshi a W. Beede, Associate Professor. 

The work oiXo-^d by the Department leading to the Ph.D. 
degree consisls Largely of research. Courses 10 and 13 are en- 
tirely of this nature. The problems offered for investigation are 
confined i'or the mosl part to stratigraphic geology mid paleon- 
tology, although several sludies in economic and geographic geol- 
ogy have la-en successfully prosecuted l>.v students in the past. 

In stratigraphic geology I he subjects covered by the re- 
searches of the Department have been concerned chiefly with the 
Ordovician and Mississippian rocks of Indiana, and with the Per- 
mian and Dpper Carboniferous rocks of Kansas, Oklahoma and 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 41 

Texas. In pur' paleontology the Department is especially 
equipped for the study of problems in the development of Paleo- 
zoic Brachiopoda and Bryozoa, and considerable work has al- 
ready been published in this field. 

For the prosecution of researches along the lines indicated 
above, the Department is adequately equipped. The collections of 
fossils are especially rich in material from the Ordovician, Silu- 
rian and Mississippian of Indiana, and the Upper Carboniferous 
and Permian of Kansas. The latter collections are among the 
best in America. A special feature of the collections is the wealth 
of screenings containing immature stages of Brachiopoda, Bryo- 
zoa, etc. 

The laboratory equipment contains the usual apparatus for 
the preparation of material, and machinery for cutting, grinding, 
and polishing thin sections of fossils. An enlarging camera, with 
special lighting appliances and combinations of lenses for a wide 
range of work, is available as an aid in the proper illustration 
of paleontological material. 

The Department receives the principal American and Euro- 
pean periodicals dealing with Geology, Geography, and Paleon- 
tology. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the 
Department. The more elementary courses are not here listed ; 
for these see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under 
that heading in the University catalogue. 

3. Economic Geology. Associate Professor Beede. 

Winter term, daily, at 10:00. 
5. Systematic Paleontology. Professor Cumings and Associate Professor 
Beede. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, two tc five hoars at times to be ar- 
ranged. 
10. liesearch. Investigation of geological and paleontological problems. 
A careful report on each investigation is required, in proper form 
for publication. Professor Cumings and Associate Professor Bei.de. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 9:00 to 4:50. 
13. Advanced field work. Continuous work in the field for a month or 
more in the Summer, Fall, or Spring. The course will usually form 
part of the research work submitted for an advanced degree. The 
work must be largely independent, but will always be under the 
general oversight of a member of the Department. 
5a. Evolution. Study of the principles of evolution, as illustrated by fossil 
organisms. Professor Cumings. 
Winter term, at an hour to be arranged. 



42 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

[14. Stratigraphic Geology. A thorough study of the literature of the 
various geologic systems. The history of their investigation and 
the present knowledge of their divisions, distribution, faunas, and 
paleogeography will he exhaustively considered. Professor Cum- 
ings. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms. Lectures, T. Th., at 10:00.] 
Omitted in 1911-12. 



DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY 

• David M. Mottier, Professor. 
Frank M. Andrews, Associate Professor. 
James M. Van Hook, Assistant Professor. 

Graduate work leading to the degree of Master of Arts in 
Botany comprises special studies along some line indicated in the 
advanced courses enumerated below, or the investigation of some 
problem of a more limited scope. For the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy, the subject of the thesis is selected from some line of 
morphology, cytology, physiology, or mycology. A reading 
knowledge of German and French is assumed. 

The departmental library contains the more necessary works 
of reference and the principal botanical journals. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the 
Department. The more elementary courses are not here listed; 
for these see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under 
that heading in the University catalogue. 

4. Morphology of Fungi. Assistant Professor Van Hook. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 1:00 to 3:00. 

5. Physiology. Associate Professor Andrews. 
Winter and Spring terms, daily. 

G. Cytology. Professor Mottier. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily. 

5a. Advanced Physiology. Special studies will be offered to those pur- 
suing work for advanced degrees. Associate Professor Andrews. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily. 

7. Research in Morphology and Cytology. Problems for special investi- 
gation in morphology and cytology will be assigned to students who 
are prepared to undertake original work. Professor Mottier. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily. 
Ability to read German and French is jissumed. 



GBADUATE SCHOOL 43 

13. Morphology of the Algae. A study of the life-history and of the de- 
velopment of vegetative and reproductive organs in certain algae. 
The work is confined very largely to fresh-water forms. Professor 

MOTTIER. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily. 

IS. Investigations in Mycology and Plant Pathology. Assistant Professor 
Van Hook. 

Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 1:00 to 3:00. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY 

Carl H. Eigenmann, Professor and Director of the Biological Station. 
Feenandus Payne, Assistant Professor. 

Full work leading to the degree Ph.D. is offered in Course 6. 
It is purely a research course, and offers the widest choice of 
subjects permitted by the equipment of the Department. 

The subjects selected have radiated from two centers. One of 
these is the problem or problems of the freshwater fauna of trop- 
ical America. At present the Department is engaged in a study 
of divergent evolution as shown by the tropical American Char- 
acin fishes. 

The Department is well equipped for this work. The most 
important of the zoological collections is the collection of fishes, 
comprising many thousand specimens. Arrangements have been 
made for cooperation with various other institutions, by which 
the largest aggregation of collections of South America fresh- 
water fishes in the world is available for the monographs in 
preparation. By special arrangement the collections of Harvard 
University, made by Professor L. Agassiz and his assistants dur- 
ing the Thayer expedition, and by others, are available for a mon- 
ograph on the American Characins. 

The Department has entered into vital relations with the Car- 
negie Museum of Pittsburg. Under the direction of Dr. W. J. 
Holland, director of this Museum, Mr. John Haseman, A.M., '07, 
during 1907-1910, explored the coast rivers of Brazil, Uraguay, 
and Argentina, between the Rio San Francisco and Buenos Aires. 
He ascended the Rio Paraguay, crossed to the Guapore and de- 
scended that river and the Rio Madeira to Manaos, on the Ama 
zon, making collections on the way. 

From August to December, 1908, Professor Eigenmann, with 
Mr. S. E. Shideler as volunteer assistant, explored the Demerara, 
Essequibo, and Potaro rivers of British Guiana. Very extensive 



44 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

collections were made in the lowland, as well as above the Kaie- 
Leur, a vertical fall of 741 feet of the Potaro river. The results 
of the expedition are being published by the Carnegie Museum as 
reports of the British Guiana Expedition of Indiana University 
and the Carnegie Museum. The final report on the fishes is in 
press. 

Mr. Jacob Gimbel, of Vincennes, Ind., provided the funds to 
equip and maintain another expedition to British Guiana, which 
started in August, 1910. Mr. Max Ellis, A.M., '08, and Mr. Will- 
iam M. Tucker, A. M., '09, led the expedition. 

The second center of departmental interest has been, and is, 
the subject of heredity, especially: (A) The history of the Sex 
Cells, (B) Variation, (C) The rate of ontogenic and phylogenic 
modification of the sense organs of Cave Animals, (D) Experi- 
mental Zoology. 

For the study of cave animals (C) the facilities of the Depart- 
ment are ideal. The University is located at the edge of the 
great cave region. By act of the Legislature, the Donaldson es- 
tate near Mitchell, Indiana, has been placed in the keeping of the 
trustees of Indiana University. On it are situated numerous sink- 
holes, dry caves, and an underground water-course at least two 
miles long. This underground river is rich in blind fishes and 
other blind aquatic animals. A small laboratory and dwelling 
has been erected on the farm, and is in charge of a research fel- 
low, appointed from year to year. In the study of cave animals 
the Department has in the past had the cooperation of the Car- 
negie Institution, the American Association for the Advancement 
of Science, and the Elizabeth Thompson Science Fund. 

For the study of variation (B) in non-migratory vertebrates 
in a 'unit of environment' this Department organized and has 
since maintained a fresh-water Biological Station. It is at pres- 
ent located on Winona Lake, Kosciusko County, Indiana, in the 
grounds of the Winona Assembly. The Station owns, as a gift of 
the Winona Assembly, two buildings, 20x45 feet, each two 
stories high. The buildings are on the lake front, at the mouth of 
Cherry Creek. The Station also owns boats, nets, sounding and 
temperature apparatus, glassware, etc. Microscopes and other 
needed apparatus are moved to the Station from the University. 

For the study of sex cells (A), and Experimental Zoology 
(D). under Hie direction of Dr. Payne, the Department owns all 
Hie necessary apparatus, and the surroundings of the University 
offer an abundance of material. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 45 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the 
Department. The more elementary courses are not here listed; 
for these see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under 
that heading in the University catalogue. 

3. Advanced ZoSlogy. Professor Eigenmann and Assistant Professor 

Pai m 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, five hours a week. 

4. General Biological Problems: (.4) The development of the idea of 

evolution and Darwinism; (B) The laws of heredity. Professor 
Eigenmann. 
Spring term, daily, at 9:00. 

5. Seminary. Weekly meetings of advanced students and instructors to 

discuss current literature and report on investigations in progress. 
Professor Eigenmann and Assistant Professor Payne. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M., at 4:00. 
15. Research. Special investigation of zoological problems, with a report 
on each investigation. Branches in which subjects have in the 
past been selected and reported upon are Variation, Degeneration, 
Regeneration, Sense Organs. Embryology of Fishes, Faunal and 
Systematic Studies of Fishes, Ecology of Cave and Freshwater 
Animals. For a fuller statement, see the general statement of the 
Department. Professor Eigenmann and Assistant Professor 
Payne. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 3 :00 to 4 :50. 
7. Biological Survey. A continuation of the previous work in the physi- 
cal and biological features of Winona Lake and its environs. Pro- 
fessor Eigenmann. 

Summer term, at the Biological Station. 

DEPARTMENT OF ANATOMY 

Burton D. Myers, Professor. 
Augustus G. Pohlman, Professor. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the 
Department. The more elementary courses are not here listed; 
for these see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under 
that heading in the University catalogue. 

13. Research Work. Opportunity for research work is offered to ad- 
vanced students who may have at least one-half their time for one 
year free for the work. Professors Myers and Pohlman. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, at hours to be appointed. 
15. Advanced Course in Anatomy. Open to students who have completed 
the dissection of the human body, or Course 8, and desire to do 
special or advanced work. Professors Myers and Pohlman. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, at hours to be appointed. 



46 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 



PHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY 

William J. Moenkhaus, Professor. 
, Assistant Professor. 

Facilities for research leading to the higher degrees are 
available within restricted lines in general Physiology. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the 
Department. The more elementary courses are not here listed ; 
for these see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under 
that heading in the University catalogue. 

G. Advanced Physiology. Professor Moenkhaus. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, at hours to be arranged. 

7. Pharmacology. Assistant Professor . 

Spring term, M. W. F., 1 :00 to 4 :50. 
10. Research. Problem work in certain phases of general physiology may 
be taken by those properly equipped. Professor Moenkhaus. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 8 :00 to 4:50. 



DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY 

Henry R. Alburger, Professor. 

The following course is open to graduate students in the 
Department. The more elementary courses are not here listed; 
for these see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under 
that heading in the University catalogue. 

4. Advanced Work and Research. Advanced diagnostic work or re- 
search work under the direction of the head of the Department. 
The facilities permit work along any of the lines of pathological 
or bacteriological research. Professor Alburger. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 8:00 to 4:50. 

EDUCATION. 

♦Ernest O. Holland, Professor of Secondary Education. 
William W. Black, Professor of p]lcmentary Education. 
Elmer E. Jones, Professor of the History and Philosophy of Education. 
Walter A. Jesslt, Professor of School Administration. 
Henry Lester Smith, Lecturer on Education. 

Graduate work is offered in the School of Education, and 
special programs leading to the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees, with the 
Master's and Doctor's certificates of Education, will be arranged 
on application. 



Wbsont on leave. 



/ 
GRADUATE SCHOOL 47 

In the future, as in the past, the best work of students in the 
courses in research work and in the pedagogical seminary will 
be publishecPTinder the title 'Contributions from the Pedagogical 
Seminary of Indiana University.' 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the 
School. The more elementary courses are not here listed ; for 
these or for fuller statements of the courses below, see the bulletin 
of the School of Education. 

5. Secondary Education in Germany, France, and England. Professor 

Jess up. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, at 11:00. 

6. History of Education. Professor Jones. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 8:00. 

10. Philosophy of Education. Professor Jones. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 8:00. 
1"). School Administration. Professor Jessup. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W., at 7 :00 p.m. 
lGff. Educational Seminary. Professor Jones. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T., at 7:00. 
1Gb. Seminary in Social Education. Professor Jessup. 

Fall term, two hours a week. Repeated in the Spring term. 
IT. Advanced Educational Psychology. Professor Jessup. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 9 :00. 
9. Orthogenics. Professor Jones. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 3 :00. 

11. Principles of Organization and Supervision. Development of the law 

and principles that control in the organization and conduct of the 
school. The law evolving the school. The curriculum under its 
logical and psychological aspects ; the basis for making a course 
of study; comparison of typical courses. Universal method in 
teaching. The organization of a subject. The organic relation of 
the logical, esthetic, and ethical ends in education. Professor 
Black. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 2 :00. 

Open to Graduate students, and to teachers of wide experience. 
18. Research in Education. 

a. The problems of the Elementary School. Professor Black. 

b. The History and Philosophy of Education. Professor Jones. 

c. The Psychology of the Processes of Education. Professor 

Jessup. 

d. Secondary Education. Professor Holland. 

e. School Administration. Professor Jessup. 

Problems and hours to be arranged with professors in charge. 



/ 



Indiana University comprises the following schools : 

The College of Liberal Arts, 
The School of Education, 
The Graduate School, 
The School of Law, 
The School of Medicine. 

The following publications are issued annually by the Uni- 
versity : 

The University Studies, 
The University Catalogue, 
The Spring Term Bulletin, 
The Summer Term Bulletin, 
Bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, 
Bulletin of the School of Education, 
Bulletin of the Graduate School, 
Bulletin of the School of Law, 
Bulletin of the School of Medicine. 

Any of these publications, with the exception of The Univer 
sity Studies, will be sent free upon application to 

The Registrar, Indiana University, 

Bloomington, Indiana. 



Vol. X, No. 3 



May 1, 1912 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY 
BULLETIN 




GRADUATE SCHOOL 

1912 



Entered as second-class matter May 16, 1908, at the postoffice at Bloomington, Indiana, 
under act of Congress of July 16, 1894 



Contents 



PAGE. 

Prefatory Note 5 

Officers and Faculty of the Graduate School 7 

General Statement of the Graduate School 9 

Purpose and Administration 9 

Admission 9 

Fees 10 

The Library 10 

Degrees 11 

Master of Arts 11 

Master of Science 12: 

Doctor of Philosophy 12 

Application for Degrees 13 

Fellowships 13 

Teaching Fellowships 13 

Donaldson Fellowship in Zoology 14r 

Lawrence Fellowship in Astronomy 14 

Fellowships for Graduates of other Indiana Colleges 14 

Research Fellowships 16 

Special Rule concerning Fellows 16 

University Organizations 16 

The Graduate Club 16 

Sigma Xi 16 

Phi Beta Kappa 16 

Departmental Clubs 17 

Departments and Graduate Courses, 1912-13 18 

Greek 18 

Latin 2G 

Romance Languages 21 

German 23 

Comparative Philology 25 

English 26 

History and Political Science 28 

Economics and Social Science 31 

Philosophy 33 

Mathematics 33 

Mechanics and Astronomy 37 

Physics 38 

Chemistry 39 

Geology 42 

Botany 43 

Zoology 44 

Anatomy 47 

Physiology 47 

Education 48 

[2—29112] (3) 



University Calendar 









SUMMER TERM, 1912 




June 


20, 


Thursday. 




Registration and enrollment for 
Summer term. 


the 


June 


21, 


Friday. 




Recitations and lectures begin for 
First half-term. (Instruction 
days a week.) 


the 
five 


July 


30, 


Tuesday. 




First half-term ends. 




July 


31, 


Wednesday. 




Recitations and lectures begin 
Second half-term. (Instruction 
days a week. 


for 
six 


Aug. 


30, 


Friday. 




Summer term ends. 










FALL TERM, 1912-13 




Sept. 


24, 


Tuesday. 




Registration and enrollment in classes 










for the Fall term. 




Sept. 


25, 


Wednesday. 




Recitations and lectures begin. 




Nov. 


28 


and 29, Thursday and Friday. 


Thanksgiving recess. 




Dec. 


20, 


Friday. 




Fall term ends. 










WINTER TERM, 1912-13 




Jan. 


2, 


Thursday. 




Registration and enrollment in classes 










for the Winter term. 




Jan. 


3, 


Friday. 




Recitations and lectures begin. 




Jan. 


20, 


Monday. 




Foundation day, a holiday. 




Feb. 


22, 


Saturday. 




Washington's birthday. 




Mar. 


21, 


frriday, 6 p. 


m. 


Winter term ends. 










SPRING TERM, 1912-13 




Mar. 


26, 


Wednesday. 




Registration and enrollment in elf 


isses 



Mar. 27, Thursday. 
June 14, Saturday, 6 p. 
June 18, Wednesday. 



for the Spring term. 
Recitations and lectures begin. 
Spring term ends. 
University Commencement. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



VOL. X BLOOMINGTON, IND , MAY I, 1912 NO. 3 



Entered as second-class matter May 16, 1908. at the postoffice at Bloomiutfton. Indiana, 
under the Act of July 16. 1894. Published from the University office. Bloomington, 
ludiana. semi-monthly April. May, and June, and monthly January, February, March, 
July. September, and November. 



Prefatory Note 



Indiana University, situated at Bloomington, is the State 
University of Indiana and the head of the public school sys- 
tem of the State. It takes its origin from the State Seminary, 
which was established by act of the Legislature, approved January 
20, 1820. In 1828 the title of the Seminary was changed by the 
Legislature to that of the Indiana College; and in 1838 the Uni- 
versity was given its present name. In 1867 Indiana University 
became coeducational. 

The University comprises the following schools : 

The College of Liberal Arts, organized in 1828, 

The School of Law, organized in 1842, re-organized in 1889, 

The School of Medicine, organized in 1903, 

The Graduate School, organized in 1904, 

The School of Education, organized in 1908. 

The first advanced degrees, conferred for graduate work, were 
granted in 1882. During the eighties, well denned regulations 
for graduate wcrk and graduate degrees were stated in the Uni- 
versity catalogue, and a considerable number of graduate students 
were enrolled, especially in the natural sciences. In the years 
1882 to 1898, inclusive, the University graduated. 14 Doctors of 
Philosophy, 99 .Masters of Arts, and 12 Masters of Science. For 
some years following 1893, however, the degree of Doctor of Phil- 
osophy was not conferred. 

In 1904 there took place a segregation and formal organization 
of the Graduate School, and in 1908 the office of Dean of the Grad- 
uate School was created. 

This number of the Bulletin is devoted to setting forth the 
facilities for graduate work- in the several Departments of the 



6 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

University. Courses intended primarily for graduate students are 
described in full. Brief announcements are given of courses in- 
tended for both graduates and undergraduates. For further des- 
cription of the latter courses, see the bulletin of the College of 
Liberal Arts, or under that heading in the University catalogue. 

The attention of graduates of other Indiana Colleges is invited 
to the announcement on page 14 of ten fellowships recently estab- 
lished by the Board of Trustees, for such students. The value of 
these fellowships is $200 each ; they also carry with them exemption 
from contingent and library fees. For further information con- 
cerning the Graduate School, address, 

The Dean of the Graduate School, 

Bloomington, Indiana. 



Officers and Faculty of the Graduate 

School 



COUNCIL 

Carl H Eigexmann, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology, Dean of the Graduate 
School. 

James Albert Woodburx, Ph.D., LL.D., Professor of American History 
and Politics. 

Harold Whetstone Johnston, Ph.D., L.H.D., LL.D., Professor of Latin. 

Robert Edward Lyons, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Arthur Lee Foley, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 

Albert Frederick Kuersteiner, Ph.D., Professor of Romance Languages. 

Ulysses Grant Weatherly, Ph.D., Litt.D., Professor of Economics and So- 
cial Science. 

Ernest Hiram Lindley, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy and Psychology. 

Burton Dorr Myers, A.M., M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

Bert John Yos, Ph.D., Professor of German. 

Schuyler Colfax Davisson, Sc.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

William J Moenkhaus, Ph.D.. Professor of Physiology. 

Will David Howe, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Elmer Ellsworth Jones, Ph.D., Professor of History and Philosophy of 
Education. 

Edgar Roscoe Cumings, Ph.D., Professor of Geology. 

Frank William Tilden, A.M., Associate Professor of Greek. 

Wilbur Adeem an Cogshall, A.M., Associate Professor of Astronomy. 

Carlos Everett Conant, Ph.D., Acting Associate Professor of Compara- 
tive Philology. 

James M Van Hook, A.M., Assistant Professor of Botany. 

FACULTY 

William Lowe Bryax, Ph.D., LL.D., President of the University. 

Horace Addison Hoffman, A.M., Professor of Greek. 

James Albert Woodburn, Ph.D., LL.D., Professor of American History 

and Politics. 
Carl H Eigenmann, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology, and Director of the 

Biological Station. 
Harold Whetstone Johnston, Ph.D., L.H.D., LL.D., Professor of Latin. 
Robert Edward Lyons, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 
Arthur Lee Foley, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 
David Myers Mottier, Ph.D., Professor of Botany. 

Albert Frederick Kuersteiner, Ph.D., Professor of Romance Languages. 
Ulysses Graxt Weatherly, Ph.D., Litt.D., Professor of Economics and 

Social Science. 
Erxest Hiram Lindley, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy and Psychology. 
Burtox Dorr Myers. A.M., M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

(7) 



8 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

Samuel Bannister Harding, Ph.D., Professor of European History. 

Amos Shartle Hershey, Ph.D., Professor of Political Science and Inter- 
national Law. 

Bert John Vos, Ph.D., Professor of German. 

William A Rawles, Ph.D., Professor of Political Economy. 

Carl Wilhelm Ferdinand Osthaus, A.M., Professor of German. 

Schuyler Colfax Davisson, Sc.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

David Andrew Rothrock, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

William J Moenkhaus, Ph.D., Professor of Physiology. 

Louis Sherman Davis, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 
jWarner Fite, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy. 

Will David Howe, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Augustus Grote Pohlman, M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

William Wesley Black, A.M., Professor of Elementary Education. 

Elmer Ellsworth Jones, Ph.D., Professor of the History and Philosophy 
of Education. 

Charles Jacob Sembrower, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Edgar Roscoe Cumings, Ph.D., Professor of Geology. 

Walter Albert Jessup, Ph.D., Dean of the School of Education, and Pro- 
fessor of School Administration. 

George Davis Morris, Doct. d'Univ. (Paris), Associate Professor of French. 

Frank William Tilden, A.M., Associate Professor of Greek. 
♦Guido Herman Stempel, A.M., Associate Professor of Comparative Phi- 
lology. 

Charles Alfred Mosemiller, A.B., Associate Professor of Romance Lan- 
guages. 

Rolla Roy Ramsey. Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics. 

Oliver W Brown, A.M., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Frank Marion Andrews, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Botany. 

Lillian Gay Berry, A.M., Associate Professor of Latin. 

Henry Thew Stephenson, B.S., A.B., Associate Professor of English. 
fFRANK Aydelotte, A.M., B.Litt., Associate Professor of English. 

Wilbur Adelman Cogshall, A.M., Associate Professor of Astronomy. 

Ulysses Sherman Hanna, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Joshua William Beede, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Geology. 

Carlos Everett Conant, Ph.D., Acting Associate Professor of Compara- 
tive Philology. 

Eugene Leser. Ph.D.. Assistant Professor of German. 

James M Van Hook. A.M., Assistant Professor of Botany. 

Frank Cubby Mathebs, Ph.D.. Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Clabence Eabl .May. Ph.D.. Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Melvin Everett T[a(;c,erty, Ph.D.. Assistanl Professor <>r Philosophy, and 

Director of the Psychological Laboratory. 
"Febnandus Payne. Ph.D., Assistanl Professor of Zoology. 

Richabd Ashley Rice, A.M., Assistanl Professor or English. 

Robebt Daniel Cabmichael, Ph.D., Assistanl Professor of Mnl hematics. 

Will Scott, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Zoology. 



I Absent on leave e<<m Februarj I to Augugl I. 1912 
* A I, 'Tii on leave from August I, em, to August I, 191?, 
i ni on leave from August I, 1912, to Augusl I. en:;. 
■ \i, ■ int "ii l ive 1 1 -in March 1 , 1912, to January 1 . 1913. 



General Statement of the Graduate 

School 



Purpose and Administration. The Graduate School furnishes 
opportunities for advanced work leading to careers in higher 
education and in certain lines of investigation. It does not offer 
work leading to professional degrees in Law or in Medicine. 

The work of the School is a direct continuation of that of the 
College of Liberal Arts; as such it is the most advanced work 
in education undertaken hy the State. The Graduate School stands, 
therefore, at the head of the University, and is the culmination of 
the public school system of the State. 

The school is administered by the Council of the Graduate 
School. It is composed of members of the Faculty representing 
different fields of learning. 

Not all departments of the University are at present equally 
equipped for extended graduate work. In recognition of this fact, 
the amount of graduate work offered by the different departments 
varies. Some departments offer work for the A.M. degree only, 
while others offer work leading to the degree of Ph.D. 

Admission. Students holding a bachelor's degree in Arts or in 
Science from Indiana L^niversity, or the same degree or its equiva- 
lent from institutions of equal rank, are admitted to the Graduate 
School on presentation of the proper credentials. Persons holding 
the bachelor's degree from institutions whose requirements are 
considered to lack a year or more of being the equivalent of the 
A.B. degree from this institution, are not admitted to the Graduate 
School. They may enter the College of Liberal Arts, and are re- 
ferred to the Dean of the College for their standing. Holders of 
the A.B. degree or its equivalent from institutions whose require- 
ments lack less than a year of being the equivalent of the A.B. 
degree from this institution, may be admitted to the Graduate 
School. In such cases, work in addition to the minimum of forty- 
five hours for the A.M. decree will be required. The amount will 
be determined in each case by the Council of the Graduate School. 

All graduate sfuclents will enroll at the beginning of each term, 
and those entering regularly organized classes will submit to the 
same regulations as undergraduate students. Work will in many 
cases be individual and not controlled by a recitation schedule. At 

(9) 



10 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

the time of entrance to the Graduate School, the student must sub- 
mit a plan of the entire work he wishes to present for the master's 
or doctor's degree. This plan must be approved by the professor 
of the major subject and the Dean of the Graduate School. 

Fees. Students who are legal residents of the State of In- 
diana are charged a Contingent fee of five dollars a term, and a 
Library fee of one dollar a term. 

These fees cover in part the cost of the physical maintenance 
of the University, and are not applied to the cost of tuition, which 
is provided wholly by the State. 

Students not legal residents of the State of Indiana, will be 
charged a Contingent and Library fee amounting to twenty dol- 
lars a term. For each Summer half-term, half the fee will be 
charged. This fee is in lieu of the regular Library and Contin- 
gent fees noted above. 

The Laboratory fees in all courses are uniformly one dollar per 
credit hour. 

The Gymnasium fee, if the work in physical training is taken, 
is one dollar a term. 

An Examination fee of one dollar is charged for each make-up 
or special examination. This fee is paid to the Bursar ; his receipt 
when presented to the proper instructor constitutes the authoriza- 
tion for holding the examination 

The fee for any degree is five dollars, and must be paid to 
the Bursar at least thirty days before graduation. 

The Library. The Library of Indiana University at present 
contains eighty-five thousand catalogued volumes. The selection of 
these books has been made with a view to facilitating instruction 
and research. The collection is a well-balanced one, but is espec- 
ially strong in literary and scientific periodicals. The list of period- 
icals received and permanently kept on file by the library numbers 
about four hundred, and includes American, English, German, 
French, and, to a less extent, Italian, Spanish, and Swedish publi- 
cations. The library is made thoroughly usable by a carefully pre- 
pared card patalqgue, by indexes, and by other' bibliographical 
aids. The Library force consists of a librarian and twelve assist- 
ants, all of whom are at the service of any authorized user of the 
library. 

In the library building are seminary rooms for the Depart- 
ments of History, Leonomies, English, Philosophy, German, Ro- 
manee Languages, Education, Latin, and Greek. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 11 

Iii addition to the central library, where the general literary 
and historical collections are housed, there are nine departmental 
collections, of varying sizes, kept in the different University build- 
ings. 

All books, with the exception of periodicals and books reserved 
for reference, may be drawn IV r home us<\ Each graduate student 
may draw five book's For two weeks, with privilege of renewal. 

The Library is open from Monday to Friday from 7:45 a.m. to 
10:00 p.m., and on Saturday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 



DEGREES 

Three advanced degrees, Master of Arts, Master of Science, and 
Doctor of Philosophy, are conferred by the University. 

Master of Arts. The degree of Master of Arts may be con- 
ferred upon Bachelors of Arts of this University, or of any other 
institution of equivalent standing, following a residence at the 
University of a minimum of three terms and the completion of a 
minimum of forty-five hours of University credit. 

Credits earned in excess of those required for the A.B., or the 
B.S., degrees, before the degree is conferred or a certificate of the 
completion of the work for the degree is issued, are not counted 
toward the A.M. degree. 

Thirty of the total of forty-five hours required for the A.M. 
degree must be in one department, or in closely allied departments. 
Fifteen hours must be distinctly graduate in character. There is 
no restriction as to the amount of work that may be carried during 
any term. 

Graduates of this University may fce given leave of absence for 
one term of the required year to pursue a specific investigation. 

The work for the A.M. degree may all be done in Summer terms, 
with the reservation that the student must be in residence during 
three out of four successive Summer terms. Summer half-terms 
may be counted toward the residence requirement, provided that 
not more than four half-terms be so counted and that the work for 
the degree be completed within five years. 

Professional studies are not accepted for the graduate degrees, 
but research work on professional subjects may be accepted for 
these degrees at the option of the professor in charge of the major 
subject. 

A thesis is required in all departments except that of Latin. 

[3—29112 



12 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

Master of Science. The degree of Master of Science may be 
conferred upon Bachelors of Science of Indiana University under 
the same conditions upon which the degree of Master of Arts is 
conferred on Bachelors of Arts. 

Doctor of Philosophy. The degree of Doctor of Philosophy 
may be conferred upon graduates of this University, or of any 
institution of similar character and rank, upon the completion of 
an advanced course of study of not less than three years. 

Each candidate for this degree will select a major subject con- 
sisting of the work of some one department or recognized sub- 
division of a department; and not less than two minors, at least 
one of which must be in some department related to, but distinct 
from that of the major subject 

The course for the degree will be pursued under the direction 
of a committee consisting of the heads of the departments in 
which the work is done. Its value will be determined by a final 
examination, and by the presentation of a satisfactory thesis. The 
thesis should usually embody original work upon some prescribed, 
or accepted, subject; it must always give evidence that the candi- 
date is capable of forming an independent judgment upon the 
recent literature of his department. 

A detailed statement of tlie work offered for the degree, in- 
dorsed by the professor in charge of the major subject, must be 
submitted to the Council of the Graduate School, not later than 
May 10 of the year in which the candidate presents himself for 
examination. 

On the recommendation of the professor in charge of the major 
subject, and with the concurrence of the Council of the Graduate 
School, part of the three years' study required for this degree nay 
be spent in residence at other universities. 

The thesis of every candidate for the degree of Doctor of Phi- 
losophy shall be presented to the Council of the Graduate School on 
or before the first day of June of the year in which he is a candidate 
for the degree. The thesis must be indorsed by the head of the 
department as being in its final form, and ready for the press. If 
the candidate is recommended for the degree, arrangements must be 
made to deposit five printed copies of the thesis in the library. 

Examinations of each candidate for this degree will be con- 
ducted by a committee consisting of all the instructors under whom 
graduate work has been taken, in the presence of such members of 
the Faculty of the school as care to attend. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 13 

At least one year before the final examination the candidate 
shall satisfy the professor in charge of the major subject of his 
ability to use French and German for purposes of investigation. 

Application for Degrees. Application for advanced degrees 
must be filed with the Dean at the time of admission to the 
Graduate School. Application for the degree of Doctor of Philoso- 
phy must be on file at least one year before the candidate is ad- 
m if ted to the examination. 

FELLOWSHIPS 

Teaching Fellowships. A number of teaching fellowships are 
available for graduate students. 

A Teaching Fellow is relieved from all term fees, and the 
fellowship carries with it an honorarium of between $200 and $500 
annuallv. The highest amount will ordinarily be paid only if the 
incumbent is appointed for a third year. A Teaching Fellowship 
is primarily a recognition of scholarship. A portion of his time 
will be required in the service of the department in which he is 
appointed; but not less than two-thirds of each Fellow's time must 
be devoted to work leading to the Doctorate in Philosophy. 

A Fellow may be appointed for three separate years, but not 
for more. Appointments are for one year, and do not necessarily 
imply a reappointment. 

The following are Teaching Fellows during the year 1911-12: 

Charles Edward Connor, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Physiology. 

Thaddeus Williamson Culmer, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Chemistry. 

Clarence Edmund Edmondson, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Physiology. 

Joseph Corrington Edwards, B.S., Teaching Fellow in Education. 

Eupha May Foley, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Philosophy. 

Jesse James Galloway, A.M., Teaching Fellow in Geology. 

Mary Theresa Harman, A.M., Teaching Fellow in Zoology. 

John William Hebel, A.B., Teaching Fellow in English. 

Edith Amelia IIennel, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Botany. 

Mayne S Howard, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Economics. 

Earl Hudelson, A.B., Teaching Fellow in English. 

Mason Edward Hufford, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Physics. 

Joseph Edward Layton, A.B., Teaching Fellow in History. 

Edward Wesley Long. A.B., Teaching Fellow in Chemistry. 

Leslie MacDii.e, A.M.. Teaching Fellow in Mathematics. 

Thomas Edward Mason, A.B.. Teaching Fellow in Mathematics. 

Alpheus Russell Neks, A.M., Teaching Fellow in Chemistry. 



14 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

Charles Elmer Owens, A.M., Teaching Fellow in Botany. 

Willa Norene Palmer, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Chemistry. 

Daniel Wilson Pearce, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Philosophy. 

Thomas Watterson Records, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Physics. 

Russell Alger Sharp, A.B., Teaching Fellow in English. 

Samuel Erwin Shideler, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Elementary Education. 

Helen Gail Spain, A.M., Teaching Fellow in English. 

Charles Haddon Spurgeon, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Zoology. 

Ceaud Earl Sutton, A.M., Teaching Fellow in Botany. 

Robert Earl Swindler, A.B., Teaching Fellow in History. 

Dayton Ulrey, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Physics. 

Donaldson Fellowship in Zoology. The Donaldson Fellow- 
ship in Zoology, of the value of $500, is open to students who are 
in large measure capable of doing independent work in biological 
subjects. The fellowship implies residence for twelve months at 
the cave farm of the University at Mitchell, Indiana. A certain 
amount of supervising work is required of the incumbent. 

Lawrence Fellowship in Astronomy. The Lawrence Fellow- 
ship of the Department of Mechanics and Astronomy has been 
established by Mr. Percival Lowell, of the Lowell Observatory, 
upon the following terms and conditions : 

1. The fellowship shall be known as the Lawrence Fellow- 
ship, in remembrance of the donor's mother, and is establisbed in 
perpetuity, revocable, however, at any time at the wall of the 
founder. 

2. It shall be annually available and shall cover the college 
calendar year, that is, from commencement to commencement of 
the same. 

3. The applicant shall be appointed by the Department, the 
donor reserving the right of final passing upon the suitability of 
the candidate so presented. 

4. The Fellow shall be given time and opportunity for an 
original thesis on some astronomical subject looking to the taking 
of a Master's degree, the nature of which shall be decided by the 
Director and the Fellow. But the Fellow shall be expected to 
give general assistance in the work of the observatory during the 
period of his fellowship. 

5. The Fellowship will pay $600 and the Fellow's traveling 
expenses to and from the Observatory at Flagstaff, Ariz.; and a 
furnished room a1 the Observatory shall be tree to the Fellow's 

USe. 

Fellowships for Graduates of Other Indiana Colleges. The 
Trustees of Indiana University, at their March meeting, 1910, es- 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 15 

tablished ten Graduate Fellowships of an annual value of $200 
each, with exemption from term fees, to be held by graduates of 
other colleges in the State. In awarding these fellowships the 
policy will be to assign them to the most promising students, irre- 
spective of the special hold of study in which they wish to work, or 
the particular institutions from which they come. As between 
cases of equal merit, however, attention will be given to securing 
a distribution of the awards among different departments of study 
and different colleges of the State. 

Applicants for these fellowships should file a statement of their 
educational history and of their plans with the Dean of the Gradu- 
ate School. They should indicate in this statement the major sub- 
ject which they wish to pursue, and give a transcript of their 
college record. They should also present at this time recommenda- 
tions from their instructors, and such other evidences of their 
fitness as they can offer. Applications will be received up to April 
15 of each year. 

Applications will be referred in each case to the department 
concerned for a decision upon the respective merits of the appli- 
cants in that department. On the basis of the departmental re- 
ports, the Graduate Council will recommend to the Trustees the 
most eligible candidates for appointment. 

These fellowships are not open to students doing professional 
work in law or in medicine. 

Incumbents will not ordinarily be eligible for reappointment, 
but they will be eligible for appointment to teaching fellowships. 

For application blanks, and further information, address the 
Dean of the Graduate School. 

The following are the Fellows for 1911-12, with the department 
in which each is working : 

Helen Margaret Connor Latin. 

A. B., Indiana State Normal School, 1911. 

Mrs. Hope Whitcomb Graham History. 

A. B.Bitler College, 1911. 

Ernest Marshall Linton Political Science. 

A.B., Bjtler College, 1911. 

Mabel Eliza McLellan Latin. 

A. B., D;Pauw University, 1910. 

Sherley O'Dair Rhea Physics- 

A. B., DaPauw University, 1911. 

Lola Ella Vance Zoology. 

A. B., DaPauw University. 1907. 



16 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

Research Fellowships. There are, besides the fellowships men- 
tioned above, research fellowships, which are awarded to students 
who have shown marked ability and who desire to investigate 
definite problems in which they are interested. Each case is de- 
cided on its merits. The compensation is fixed by the Board of 
Trustees, on the recommendation of the Graduate Coun eil 

The following are Research Fellows during the year 191 1-12 : 

Halbert Pleasant Bybee, A.B., Research Fellow in Geology. 
Everett Harrison Craig, A.B., Research Fellow in Chemistry. 
Logan Esarey, A.M., Research Fellow in Indiana History. 
Mary Alice Gilbert, A.B., Research Fellow in Latin. 
John Hamilton Keck, A.B., Research Fellow in Chemistry. 
Ira Elver Lee, A.B., Research Fellow in Chemistry. 
Mary Rogers, A.M., Research Fellow in Orthogenics. 

Special Rule Concerning Fellows. Holders of fellowships are 
not permitted, without the special permission of the Graduate 
Council, to do work for remuneration outside the University. 

UNIVERSITY ORGANIZATIONS 

The Graduate Club. A graduate club was founded in 1910 to 
establish closer relations among the graduate students, and between 
graduate students and the members of the faculty. Through closer 
association and acquaintanceship, the club aims to foster solidarity 
of interest. The meetings are in part social, and in part devoted 
to the presentation of papers by the members of the club, giving 
the results of some investigation carried on by the author. In this 
way students in the different departments are made acquainted 
with the work in various lines of research carried on in the Uni- 
versity. Occasionally addresses are given by visitors of prominence. 
Membership in the club is open to all graduate students. 

Sigma Xi. Sigma Xi is an organization especially for scien- 
tific students. It is a chapter of a national scientific fraternity, to 
which members of the faculty, graduate students, and seniors may 
be elected. Its object is to encourage investigation in science, pure 
and applied. 

Phi Beta Kappa. Phi Beta Kappa is a chapter of the oldest 
Greek-letter fraternity, founded in 1 776 for "the promotion of 
scholarship and friendship among students and graduates of 
American colleges/' It is today no longer a secret society, but an 
honor society, having for- its special aim the encouragement of 
liberal culture. At Indiana. University, ;i certain number of sen- 
iors, not over ten per cent, are elected each year, partly at Thanks- 



<;i: \IH \ TK SCHOOL 1/? 

giving and partly at Commencement. The membership includes 
also en-tain members of the faculty, and a few others chosen di- 
rectly from the ranks of the alumni. The chapter was established 
on Foundation Day, 1911. 

Departmental Clubs. The following departments have special 
departmental clubs : Geology, Zoology, Physics, Chemistry, His- 
tory. Philosophy, English, Mathematics, German, French, Spanish, 
and Comparative Philology. Membership in these clubs is open to 
faculty members of the department, graduate students, and under- 
graduates. The purpose of the clubs is to discuss topics of interest 
to members, and to promote social intercourse. 



Departments and Graduate Courses 
of Instruction, 1912-13 



*** In the following list are included many courses which are open alike to graduates and ad- 
vanced underclassmen. Only a skeleton announcement of these is here made; for full description see 
the bulletin of tha C Jllege of Liberal Arts, or under that heading in the University catalogue. Strictly 
graduate courses are described in full. The more elementary courses are not listed here at all. 



DEPARTMENT OF GREEK 

Horace A. Hoffman, Professor. 

Frank W. Tilden, Associate Professor. 

The time that at the present may be profitably devoted to gradu- 
ate work in Greek is one year, leading to the degree of A.M. A 
thesis on some subject connected with the seminary work of the 
year is required for the degree. 

All candidates for A.M., with Greek as major subject, must take 
at least fifteen hours in Latin, in advance of the Latin taken in the 
undergraduate study. 

Courses 9, 12, and 13, or any part of these courses, are also open 
as minors to graduate students who have not already had as part 
of their undergraduate study the work which they take in their 
courses for graduate credit. 

The Department is well equipped for doing satisfactory work 
leading to the degree of Master of Arts. Besides the most impor- 
tant reference books, cyclopedias, dictionaries, lexicons, indexes, 
and standard editions of Greek writers, an effort has been made 
to build up an especially good collection of works treating of 
Euripides, since seminary work is generally given in that author. 
The Department has the chief older editions as well as nearly all 
of the later ones, and many special works bearing on Euripides. 

The Library contains the most important classical journals, 
among them complete sets of 'The American Journal of Philol- 
ogy ' ; ' The American Journal of Archaeology ' ; ' The Classical Re- 
vicw'; Chicago, Cornell, and Harvard 'Studies'; 'Hermes'; 
'Jahrbiicher fiir classische Philologie'; ' Mitteilungen d. deutsch. 
arch. Inst, in At hen'; 'Philologus'; 'Rhcinisches Museum'; 'Jour- 
nal* of Hellenic Studies'. 

Among the most valuable works in the field of archaeology and 
arl the following may be mimed: 'Antike Denkmaler'; 'Ausgra- 

(18) 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 19 

bungen von Olympia'; 'Carapanos'; 'Dodona'; Hamdey-Bey and 
Reinach's 'NScropole a Sidon'; Homolle's 'Foiiilles de Delphes'; 
Ohnefalsch-Richter's 'Cypros, die Bibel und Homer'; Overbeck's 
'Griechische Kunstmythologie ' ; Stackelberg's 'Die G-raber der 
Hellenen'; Fenger's 'Dorische Polychromie'; and the publications 
of the American and British Schools of Athens, and of the Egyp- 
tian Exploration Fund. Among the works on inscriptions and 
epigraphy the following may be mentioned: 'Corpus Inscrip- 
tionum Clraeearum' ; 'Corpus Inscriptionum Attiearum'; 'Inscr. 
Graec. Septentrionalis, Italiae, Pelopon., Insularum, etc.,' 'Die 
Inschriften von Priene', and the important writings of such author- 
ities as Klein, Kretschmer, Meisterhans, etc. For palaeography 
and the study of the papyri, the following are accessible : Grenfell, 
Hunt, Kenyon, Mahaffy, Mayser, Mitteis, Thompson, and Wilkin. 
In the important field of vase-painting, the Library contains many 
valuable works. Among the most noteworthy are: Benndorf's 
'Griechische und Sicilische Vasenbilder' ; Collignon and Rayet's 
'Histoire de la Ceramique grecque'; Dechelette's 'Les Vases 
ceramiques ornes de la Gaule romaine'; Furtwangler and 
Loeschke's ' Mykenische Vasen,' and 'Mykenische Thongefasse ' : 
Furtwangler and Reichhold's 'Griechische Yasenmalerei' ; Harri- 
son and McColl's 'Types of Greek Vases,' and various books by 
Gardner, Huddilston, Klein, Kretschmer, Murray, Smith, and 
Walters. 

The Department also owns upwards of 700 photographs of 
landscapes, buildings, and works of art in Greece, Italy, and 
Sicily; and has many lantern-slides, busts, casts, a model of the 
Acropolis at Athens, and a series of reproductions of the famous 
Tanagra Figurines. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the De- 
partment. The more elementary courses are not here listed ; for 
these see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under that 
heading in the University catalogue : 

9. Lyric and Dramatic Poetry. Associate Professor Tilden. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, at 9:00. 

12. Philosophical Prose. Professor Hoffman. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 10:00. 

13. Historical and Rhetorical Prose. Associate Professor Tilden. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at j0:00. 

15a. Graduate Seminary. Euripides is the author usually studied, but 
other authors may be selected. In 1911-12 Plutarch's 'Pericles' 
was made the basis of the work, and the portions of Thucydides 

4—29112] 



20 INDIANA INIVERKITY 

and other authors bearing on the life and policies of Pericles were 
also studied. Professor Hoffman. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, W., at hours to be appointed. 
15fr. Graduate Seminary: Aeschylus. In 1911-12 all the plays and frag- 
ments were studied, chiefly with a view to the religious and 
ethical ideas of Aeschylus. Associate Professor Tilden. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, F., at hours to be appointed. 

DEPARTMENT OF LATIN 

Harold AY. Johnston, Professor. 
Lillian Gay Berry, Associate Professor. 

The graduate courses of the Department are intended to meet 
the wants of those making the teaching of Latin in schools and 
colleges their profession, whether or not they are candidates for a 
degree. The work of the first year (Courses 34 or 33, and 41) con- 
sists chiefly of lectures and recitations. After the first year the 
work is to a great extent individual (Courses 42 and 50 \ including, 
besides wide reading in authors of all periods, the first-hand in- 
vestigation of some subject selected with the approval of the De- 
partment. 

In the Summer term courses are offered for both graduates and 
undergraduates. The work for the A.M. degree may be done in 
three summers. The undergraduate courses may be counted to 
satisfy the language requirement for graduation in other depart- 
ments, or as elective work, but may not be counted for graduation 
in Latin without the permission of the Department obtained in 
advance. 

If Course 33 is taken in the undergraduate course, Course 34 
should be made a part of the graduate work, and vice versa. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the De- 
part nn'tit. The more elementary courses are not here listed; for 
those see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under that 
heading in the University catalogue. 

(.*:.''>. Prose Writers of the Repulic. Professor Johnston. 
Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, M. \V. P., at 9:00. 
Courses 33 and 34 are given in alternate years.]. 
Omitted in 1(HLMr>>. 
'.'A. Poets of the Republic. Professor Johnston. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. P., at 9:00. 
41. Topography and Monuments of Ancient Rome. Recitations, lectures, 
and assigned readings. Associate Professor Berry. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, once a week, at an hour to be ar- 
ranged. 
Platner, 'Ancient Rome.' 

Open to graduate Students only. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 21 

12. Readings in Latin Literature. The student will be guided and as- 
sisted in reading very considerable portions of those authors not 
included in other courses, with stress laid upon the subject- 
matter rather than upon the language and style. Analysis and 
summaries will he prepared l>y the student and criticized by the 
instructor. Professor Johnston and Associate Professor Berry. 

Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, once a week, at an hour to be ar- 
ranged. 

Open to graduate students only. 

43. Advanced Composition. This course is intended especially for teach- 
ers, but may be taken by any persons who need practice in writ- 
ing Latin. Professor Johnston. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, once a week, at an hour to be ar- 
ranged. 

Open to gradutes and teachers of Latin. 

50. Seminary. The critical study of the text of some standard author, 
with incidental investigation of problems in syntax, style, 
prosody, and so forth. In past years, Caesar, Sallust, Tacitus, 
and Plautus have been made the subjects of similar work. In 
1912-13 it is proposed to make a study of Terence. The student 
should be provided with the critical edition of Umpfenbach and 
the text editions of Dziatzko and Fleckeisen. Professor John- 
ston. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M., 2 :00 to 3 :50. 

Open to students who have had one year's graduate work. 

DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES 

Albert F. Kuersteiner, Professor of Romance Languages. 

George D. Morris, Associate Professor of French. 

Charles A. Mosemiller, Associate Professor of Romance Languages. 

The Department of Romance Languages offers one year of 
graduate work, all in French. 

The Library is well equipped with works in French criticism, 
and has a fair selection of work? of French literature. It contains, 
also, all of the volumes so far published by the * Societe des anciens 
textes francais', and the following periodical publications: 

Archiv fur das Studium der neueren Sprachen und Literaturen. 

Bibliothek des litterarischen Vereins in Stuttgart. 

Fuphorion. 

Franzosische Studien. 

Germaniseh-Romanische Monatsschrift. 

Literaturblatt fiir germanische und romanische Philologie. 

Modern Language Notes. 

Modern Language Review. 

Modern Philology. 

Publications of the Modern Language Association of America. 



22 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

Revue Bleue. 

Revue de Cours et Conferences. 

Revue des deux Mondes. 

Romania. 

Zeitschrift fur franzosische Sprache und Ldtteratur. 

Zeitsehrift fiir romanische Philologie. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the De- 
partment. The more elementary courses are not here listed; i'or 
these see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under that 
heading in the University catalogue : 

7. Seventeenth Century Poetry and Drama. Professor Kuersteiner. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 9:00. 

[24. Eighteenth Century Poetry and Drama. Professor Kuersteiner. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 9:00.] 
Omitted in 1912-13. 

[10. Nineteenth Century: The Romantic Period. Associate Professor 
Morris. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 10:00.] 
Omitted in 1912-13. 

27. Nineteenth Century : The Realistic Period. Associate Professor 
Morris. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 10.00. 

[32. Contemporary Fiction. Associate Professor Morris. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 10:00.] 
Omitted in 1912-13. 

.".::. Contemporary Drama. Associate Professor Morris. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 10.00. 

20. Advanced Composition. Associate Professor Mosemiller. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T.. Th., at 2.00. 

L3. Old French. Reading of texts; study of Old French phonology and 
morphology; exercises in tracing words from classical and from 
popular Latin to Modern French. Lectures. Professor Kuer- 
steiner. 

Full, Winter, and Spring lenns, M. AV. F., at 11:00. 

Paris. 'Extraits de la Chanson de Roland'; Suchier, 'Aucassin et 
Nicolete' (French edition) ; Constans, 'Ghrestomathie de l'ancien 
frangais' ; Paris-Langlois, 'Chrestomathie du moyen-age'; Paris- 
Langlois, 'Extraits des chroniqueurs frangais'. 

open to students who have studied French and Latin. 



GBADTJ UT. SCHOOL 23 

DEPARTMENT OF GERMAN 

Bebt J. Vos, Professor. 

Cakl YV. V. Osthaus, Professor. 

Eugene Leser, Assistant Professor. 

In combination with the Department of Comparative Philology, 
which gives courses in Gothic, Old High German, and Old Norse, 
the Department at present offers about thirty-five hours of gradu- 
ate work. Students entering upon the graduate study of German 
must previously have completed the courses required for a major 
in the Department, or their equivalent. Courses 27 and 29 are, 
however, open to students of other departments than German upon 
the completion of the work of the Junior year. The library is well 
equipped with books for the special study of Classical and Nine- 
teenth Century German literature. 

The list of complete sets of periodicals and of current publica- 
tions received includes the following, those marked with an asterisk 
representing complete sets: 

Aleinannia. 

Allgemeine Zeitung. Miinchen. 

*Archiv fur das Studium der neueren Sprachen und Literaturen. 
♦Archiv fur Litteraturgeschichte. 

Archiv for nordisk Filologi. 

♦Beitrage zur Geschichte der deutschen Sprache und Literatur. 
*Bibliothek des litter a rischen Vereins in Stuttgart. 
♦Columbia University Germanic Studies. 

Das Litterarische Echo. 
♦Euphorion. 

♦Forschungen zur neueren Literaturgeschichte, herausgegeben von F. 
Muneker. 

German-American Annals. 
♦Germaniseh-Romanische Monatsscbrift. 
*Goethe Jabrbuch. 
*Indogermanische Forschungen. 

Jabrbucb des freien deutschen Hochstifts. 
♦Jahrbuch der Grillparzer Gesellschaft. 

Jahrbuch des Vereins ftir niederdeutsche Sprachforschung. 
♦Jahresbericht iiber die Erscheinungen auf dem Gebiote der Germanischen 

Philologie. 
♦Jahresberichte fiir neuere deutsche Litteraturgeschichte. 
♦Journal of English and Germanic Philology. 

Korrespondenzblatt des Vereins fiir niederdeutsche Sprachforschung. 
*Literaturblatt fiir germanische und romanische Philologie. 
♦Modern Language Notes. 
♦Modern Language Review. 
♦Modern Philology. 
♦Monatshefte fiir deutsche Sprache und Piidagogik. 



24 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

* Publications of the Modern Language Association of America. 

*Quellen und Forschungen. 

*Revue germanique. 

*Veroffentlichungen des Schwabischen Schiller Vereins. 

♦Vierteljahrschrift fiir Litteraturgeschichte. 

Zeitschrift des Allgemeinen deutschen Sprachvereins. 
♦Zeitschrift des Vereins fur Volksknnde. 

Zeitschrift fiir Biicherfreunde. 
"^Zeitschrift fiir deutsches Altertum. 

Zeitschrift fiir dentsche Mundarten. 
^Zeitschrift fiir deutsche Philologie. 

Zeitschrift fiir den deutschen Unterricht. 
::: Zeitschrift fiir deutsche Wortforschung. 

Zeitschrift fiir die osterreichischen Gymnasien. 
*Zeitschrift fiir vergleichende Litteraturgeschichte. 

For Gothic and Old High German, see Courses 4 and 9 of the 
Department of Comparative Philology. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the De- 
partment. The more elementary courses are not here listed ; for 
these see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under that- 
heading in the University catalogue : 
14. German Usage. Assistant Professor Lesek. 

Winter and Spring terms, T. Th., at an hour to be appointed. 

30. Studies in the recent German Drama. Professor Osthaus. 
Fall term, M. W. F., at an hour to be appointed. 

28'. Journal Club. This course is introductory to the work of the Ger- 
man Seminary. Members make reports upon the contents of cur- 
rent numbers of journals devoted to German literature and phi- 
lology, and are trained in the use of important works of refer- 
ence. Two to five hours' credit. Professor Vos. 
Fall term, two hours weekly, at an hour to be appointed. 

22. German Seminary: Goethe as a Lyric Poet. Conducted mainly in 
German. Two to live hours' credit. Professor Vos. 

Winter and Spring terms, two hours weekly, at an hour to be ap- 
pointed. 

Open to students who have completed Course 28. 

L'7. Middle High German. Outline of the phonology, accidence and syn- 
tax. Reading of selections from the lyric poets, the popular and 
COUrl epic. Professor Vos. 

Pall ;iii(l Winter terms, two hours weekly, at an hour to be ap- 
pointed. 

21). History of the German Language. The relation of German to other 
Germanic languages; the dialectic divisions of Modern German; 
origins of tin 1 literary language; changes since (lie noddle period; 
history of German orthography. Conducted partly in German. 
Professor Vos. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 25 

Spring term, two hours weekly, at an hour to he appointed. 
Behaghel, 'Die deutsche Sprache' ('Das Wissen der Gegenwart', 
Band 54). 

DEPARTMENT OF COMPARATIVE PHILOLOGY 

*Gtjido II. Stempel, Associate Professor. 
C. Everett Conant, Acting Associate Professor. 

The graduate courses offered below will be extended as required. 
They may be supplemented by certain of the courses listed as un- 
dergraduate, as well as by certain courses given in the other lan- 
guage Departments and in History, Social Science (Anthropology), 
Philosophy, and English. The time that can profitably be spent 
here in graduate study in Philology is at present about two years. 

The collection of American, British, and German periodicals 
devoted to Indo-European philology is practically complete. 

The more elementary courses of the Department are not here 
listed ; for these see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or 
under that heading in the University catalogue. 

5. Comparative Philology of the Classical Languages. An advanced 
course in the science of language and Indo-European philology. 
Each student will emphasize the particular language in which he 
has had special training. Associate Professor Conant. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 10:00. 

Giles, 'Manual of Comparative Philology for Classical Students'. 

Open to students who have passed in Courses 2 and 3, and in thirty 
hours of language, and to advanced students in Latin or Greek. 
4. Gothic. Grammar and reading ; phonology of the early Germanic 
languages. Associate Professor Conant. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 10:00. 

Wright, 'Primer of the Gothic Language'. 

Open to students who have passed in Course 2 and in thirty hours 
of language, and to others at the option of the instructor. ■ 

Given every third year ; see Courses 9 and 10. 

8. Sanskrit. Grammar and reading; comparative phonology of the 

languages. Associate Professor Conant. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 11:00. 
Perry, 'Sanskrit Primer' (or Lanman, 'Sanskrit Reader') ; and 

Whitney, 'Sanskrit Grammar'. 
Open to advanced students in Latin or Greek at the option of the 

instructor. 

[9. Old High German. Elements of the grammar, reading of selected 
texts, study of dialectal divergence. The method will be both 
comparative and historical. 



•Absent on leave from August 1, 1911, to August 1, 1912. 



26 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

Fall, Winter, and Spring tonus. T. Th., at 10:00. 

Wright, 'Old High German Primer'; Braune, 'A'thoclidentsche Gram- 
niatik"; Braune, 'Althochdeutsches Lesehuch'. 

Open to students on snme conditions as Course 4.] 

Omitted in 1012-13. Given every third year, following Course 4; sec 
Courses 4 and 10. 
[10. Middle High German. (1) Fall term: Elements of the grammar, 
reading of easy texts, and study of the development of the Ger- 
man language. (2) Winter and Spring terms: Nibelungenlied, 
with special study of the popular epic. 

Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 10:00. 

Wright, 'Middle High German Primer' ; Paul, 'Mittelhochdeutsche 
Grammatik' ; Robertson, 'Der arme Heinrich' ; Zarncke, 'Das Ni- 
belungenlied'. 

Open to students on same conditions as Course 4.] 

Omitted in 1912-13. Given every third year, following Course 9; see 
Courses 9 and 10. 
[ 11. Old Norse. Introduction to the language, and the reading of texts 
that throw light upon the popular literature of England and Ger- 
many. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 10:00. 

Sweet, 'Icelandic Primer' ; selected texts. 

Open to students who have passed in fifteen hours of Germanic phi- 
lology and to others at the option of the instructor.] 

Omitted in 1912-13. 
15. Seminary. Some topic in grammatical theory or the development of 
some English usage will be made the basis of study. Associate 
Professor Conant. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, W., 2:00 to 3:50. 

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

Will D. Howe, Professor. 
Charles J. Sembower, Professor. 
Henry T. Stephenson, Associate Professor. 
♦Frank Aydelotte, Associate Professor. 
Richard A. Rice, Assistant Professor. 

The Department is prepared to offer research work leading to 
tin A.M. and Ph.D. degrees, in the following periods: Elizabethan 
literature, the literature of the Seventeenth Century, of the 
Eighteenth Century, and of the first half of the Nineteenth Century. 

The University library contains the chief Society publications; 
for example, The Early English Text Society, Chaucer Society, 
Spr-nser Society, Shakspere (Old and New), Shakespeare Jahr- 
buch, Huth Library, Malone. Substantial additions are being made 
each year. Besides these publications, all the principal reviews and 
journals are received. 



•Ab§en< on leave, Augual I, 1U12, to Anoint 1, 191.3. 



GRADtJATE SCHOOL 27 

For the degree of A.M., the candidate should have had in his 
undergraduate work the equivalent of forty-five hours of English, 
and should^ in his graduate work, pursue a eourse restricted to 
three subjects, approved by the Department of English. 

For the degree of J'h.D., the candidate will be expected to do 
at least two full years' work in residence after the degree of A.M. 
He must be able to read German and French, and to do a piece of 
independent research which will be acceptable to the Department. 

The following courses are open to graduate students in the De- 
partment. The more elementary courses are not here listed; for 
these see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under that 
heading in the University catalogue. 

0. Elizabethan Drama (1557-1025). Associate Professor Stephenson. 
Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, three hours a week. 

10. Shakspere. Associate Professor Stephenson. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, two hours a week. 

33. Literary Criticism. Professor Howe. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, two hours a week. 

35. Seminary in Composition. Professor Sembower and Associate Pro- 
fessor Stephenson. 
Hours and credit to be arranged. 

42. Chaucer. Assistant Professor Rice. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, two hours a week. 

44. The Age of Milton and the Age of Dry den (1625-1700). Professor 

Sembower. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, two hours a week. 

45. The Eighteenth Century (1700-1770). Professor Howe. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, two hours a week. 

56. Contemporary Drama. Mr. Jenkins. 

Fall and Winter terms, two hours a week. 

Not more than one-third of the work in English of a candidate 
for the degree of A.M. in this Department may consist of the courses 
listed above. 

T17. Metrics. A study of modern English meter.] 
Omitted in 1012-13. 

[50. Research Course in Anglo-Saxon Literature. An investigation of 
sources and authorities; reading of Anglo-Saxon literature. Pre- 
requisite, Comparative Philology 2. Five hours of credit may be 
secured in this course each term.] 
Omitted in 1912-13. 



28 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

|51. Research Course in Middle English Literature. Rending of much 
prose, many romances, and some of the most important poems ; 
study of sources and relationship. It is expected that students 
who take this course will be able to read Middle English, Ger- 
man, and French. Five hours of credit may be secured in this 
course each term.] 
Omitted in 1912-13. 

52. Elizabethan Literature. Studies in the various forms of literature of 

the Elizabethan Age; investigation of sources and relationships. 
The work may deal either with individual authors or special liter- 
ary forms. A reading knowledge of German and Free h is re- 
quired. Five hours of credit may be secured in this course each 
term. Associate Professor Stephenson. 

53. Seventeenth Century Literature. A research course in the literature 

from 1025-1 700. Reading knowledge of German and French is 
required. Five hours of credit may be secured in this course each 
term. Professor Sembower. 

54. Eighteenth Century Literature. Studies in one of the fields of litera- 

ture — the poetry, the drama, the essay, or the novel. Reading 
knowledge of German and French is required. Five hours of 
credit may be secured in this course each term. Professor Howe 
and Assistant Professor Rice. 

55. Research Studies in the Literature of the Nineteenth Century- Dis- 

cussion of the various literary forms and study of the relation- 
ship between English and contemporary European literature. 
Reading knowledge of German and French is required. Five 
hours of credit may be secured in this course each term. Profes- 
sors Howe and Sembower. 



DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

James A. Woodburn, Professor of American History and Politics. 
Samttel B. Harding, Professor of European History. 
Amos S. Hershey, Professor of Political Science. 
Thomas L. Harris, Instructor in History. 
Logan Esarey, Research Fellow. 

The Department is prepared to offer research work leading to 
A.M. and Ph.D. degrees, in the following fields: American Colonial 
History, the American Civil War and Reconstruction and the his- 
tory of American political parties, English History in the Seven- 
th-nth and Nineteenth Centuries, the French Revolution, Diplo- 
matic History, Political Philosophy, International Law, and the 
History of Indiana during the Middle Period, 1820-1860. In each 
of these fields good lihrary collections arc already at hand, to which 
constant additions arc Icing made. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 29 

The follow in u are among the periodicals and continuation sets 
at the disposal of advanced students of history and political 

science: 

American Historical Association, Annual Reports, 1884- 

Amorican Historical Review, I8®6- 

American Journal of International Law, 1907- 

Anicrican Magazine of Civics, 1S94-G. 

American Political Science Review, 1905- 

Annales des Sciences Politiques, 1899- 

Annals of the American Academy of Political Science, 1890- 

Annuaire Historique, 1S19-50. 

Annual Register, 1791-1S28. 

Archives Diplomatiques, 1905- 

Camden Miscellany, 1847- 

Cainden Society Publications, 1838- 

Columbia University Studies in History, Economics, and Public Law, 1891- 

Cyclopedic Review of Current History, 1893-1902. 

DeBow's Review, 1846-68. 

English Historical Review, 1889- 

Historical Manuscripts Commission Reports (Great Britain), 1870- 

Gulf States Historical Magazine, 1902-04. 

Hansard's Parliamentary Debates, 1812-1897. 

Harvard Historical Studies, 1896- 

Historische Zeitschrift, 1888- 

Iowa Journal of History and Politics, 1903- 

Johns Hopkins University Studies in History and Political Science, 1883- 

Magazine of American History, 1880-93. 

Nile's Weekly Register, 1811-49. 

Political Science Quarterly, 1886- 

La Revolution Frangaise, 1899- 

Revue de Droit International et de Legislation Comparee, 1896- 

Revue Generate de Droit International et de Legislation Comparee, 1896- 

Revue Historique, 1895- 

Revue Politique et Litteraire: Revue Bleue, 1880- 

Royal Historical Society Transactions, 3d series, 1907- 

South Atlantic Quarterly, 1903- 

London Times (weekly ed.), 1896-7; 1901- 

University of Missouri Studies, 1901- 

University of Pennsylvania Publications : Series in Political Economy and 
Public Law, 1889- 

University of Wisconsin Bulletin : Economics, Political Science, and His- 
tory series, 1894-99. 

Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, 1894- 

William and Mary College Quarterly Historical Magazine, 1902- 

Zeitschrift fur Volkerrecht und Bundesstaatsrecht, 1906- 

Candidates for the degree Ph.D., with History as major subject, 
will be examined on each of the following fields: (1) Ancient His- 
tory, with emphasis at the option of the candidate in either Greek 



30 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

or Roman History; (2) Media?val and Modern History, with em- 
phasis in either the mediaeval or the modern field; (3) English His- 
tory, with emphasis either on the period before 1485, or after that 
date; and (4) American History, with chief emphasis either on the 
period before 1783, or after that date. The examination on the 
special field of the thesis will naturally be more searching than 
elsewhere. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in this De- 
partment. The more elementary courses are not here listed; for 
these see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under that 
heading in the University catalogue. 

0. English History. Professor Harding. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 10:00. 
9. Renaissance and Reformation. Professor Harding. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 9:00. 
22. American Diplomatic History. Mr. Harris. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 8:00. 
23a. Government and Parties of England. Professor Hers hey. 

Fall term, M. W. F., at 11 :00. 
23&. Government and Parties of Continental Europe. Professor Hers hey. 

Winter term, M. W. F., at 11 :00. 
24. History of Political Ideas and Theory of the State. Professor Her- 
shey. 
Spring term, M. W. F., at 11 :00. 
[13. France in the Middle Ages. A study of the institutions of mediaeval 
France, and of the processes whereby the feudal type of society 
was transformed into the modern state. Lectures, collateral 
reading, and reports on assigned topics. Professor Harding. 
Fall and Winter terms, T. Th., at 11 :00.] 
Omitted in 3912-13. 
10. Historical Method. The principles of historical investigation, with 
some practice in the use of sources and the preparation of pa- 
pers. Professor Harding. 
Fall term, T. Th., at an hour to he appointed. 

28. American Political Parties. A study of some of the more notable 

leaders and party programs in the political and constitutional 
controversies in the national period of American history. De- 
signed (o introduce the student to a first-hand knowledge of the 
materials relating to the leading issues in our national party de- 
velopment. Professor Woooburn. 
Pall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 9:00. 

29. History of Indiana in the Middle Period of the Nineteenth Century, 

L816-1860. A study of the development of the State, its settle- 
ment, population, laws, Internal improvements, canals, banking 
system, schools, and social life Mr. ESABEY. 
Pall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 11:00. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 31 

20(7. Seminary in English History. Individual research work, under the 
guidance of the instructor, on some subject connected with mod- 
ern English history. The results of the investigations are pre- 
sented from time to time as reports and are finally embodied in 
papers in form suitable for publication, of which a copy must 
be left with the Seminary. Professor Harding. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms. Hours for individual conference to 
be arranged. 
20c. Seminary in American Constitutional and Political History. In 
1011-12 the topics of study related to Indiana in connection with 
national political history in the decade before the Civil War. 
Study of sources, reports of investigations, and thesis work. 
Professor Woodburn. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M„ at 4 :00 to 5 :30. 

Open to advanced students and graduates. 
20(7. Seminary in International Law and Diplomacy. Research work and 
the special study of important topics, more especially of present 
day problems. During recent years such subjects were selected 
as the Alabama Claims, the Panama Affair, the causes of the 
Russo-Japanese War, the 'Open Door' policy in China, and the 
genesis of the Monroe Doctrine. Professor Hershey. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, at hours to be appointed. 

DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS AND SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Ulysses G. Weathekly, Professor of Economics and Social Science. 

William A. Rawles, Professor of Political Economy. 

Clarence J. Foreman, Instructor. 

John A. Lapp, Lecturer on Social Legislation. 

While the graduate work of the Department is primarily in- 
tended to cover one year and to lead to the Master's degree, it may 
in certain cases be extended to cover the requirements for the 
Doctor's degree. In the following special fields the courses of in- 
struction are ample and the research materials adequate: Eco- 
nomic History, Economic Theory, Monev and Finance, Statistics 
and Statistical Method, Historical and Descriptive Sociology, So- 
ciological Theory, and Social Technology. 

The Department library is equipped with full sets of the most 
important public documents, both state and national, and has com- 
plete sets of most of the American, English, French, and German 
economic periodicals. Advanced students have direct access to 
these materials, and also to the special collections relating to char- 
itable and correctional institutions. The Department is affiliated 
with the Charity Organization Society of Indianapolis, with the 
Social Service Department of the School of Medicine, and with the 
Legislative Reference Department of the State Library. Through 



32 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

these agencies properly qualified students are enabled to come into 
direct contact with the social and economic problems of Indianap- 
olis. Constant use is also made of the statistical materials in the 
various departments of the State government. 

The more elementary courses of the Department are not here 
listed; for these see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or 
under that heading in the University catalogue. 

6. Money, Banking, and the Money Market. Professor Rawles. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 8.00. 
3. Public Finance. Professor Rawles. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 8 :00. 
!). Transportation. Professor Rawles. 

Spring term, M. W. F., at 9 :00. 
5. Advanced Political Economy. Mr. Foreman. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 11 :00. 
20a. Descriptive Sociology: Social Origins. Professor Weatherly. 

Fall term, T. Th., at 10 :00. 
20?>. Descriptive Sociology: Domestic Institutions. Professor Weath- 
erly. 
Winter term, T. Th., at 10:00. 
20c. Descriptive Sociology : Demography. Professor Weatherly. 
Spring term, T. Th., at 10:00. 
4a. Social Pathology : Poverty and Charities. Professor Weatherly. 

Fall term, T. Th., at 11:00. 
46. Social Pathology : Crime and Penology. Professor Weatherly. 

Winter term, T. Th., at II :00. 
4c. Social Pathology: Special Problems. Professor Weatherly. 

Spring term, T. Th., at 11 :00. 
10. Socialism and Social Reform. Professor Weatherly. 

Fall term, M. W. F., at IO:00. 
la. General Sociology: Social Forces. Professor Weatherly. 

Winter term, M. W. F., at 10:00. 
lb. General Sociology: Social Efficiency. Professor Weatherly. 

Spring term, M. W. P., at 10:00. 
s. Seminary in Economics ami Sociology. Professor's Weatherly and 
Kawi.ks, Mr. Foreman and Mr. Dapp. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, W., 3:00 to 4:50. 
&a. Research. Professors Weatherly ami Rawles, Mr. Foreman and 
Mr. Lapp. 
Pall, Winter, and Spring terms, ;it hours to be appointed. 



GRADUATE school S3 

DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY 

Kkm:st II. Limhiy. Professor of Philosophy and Psychology. 

Wakmk Fitk. Professor of Philosophy. 

Wn.i. ian" L. Bhyan, Lecturer on Ethics. 

Mi Iain E. Maookkty. Assistant Professor and Director of the Psychological 

Laboratory. 
William K. Weight, Acting Assistant Professor. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the De- 
partment. The more elementary courses are not here listed; for 
these see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under that 
heading in the University catalogue. 

34. Psychological Seminary. Professor Lindley ami Assistant Professor 

Haggerty. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, two hours a week. 

35. Modern Idealism. Professor Fite. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 10:00. 
[30. Advanced Logic and Methods of Science. Professor Fite. 

Fall and Winter terms, two hours once a week at a period to be 

arranged.] 
Omitted in 1912-13. 
5. Advanced Psychology. Professor Lindley or Professor Fite. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, at hours to he arranged. 

7. Comparative Psychology. Assistant Professor Haggerty. 
Fall and Winter terms, M. W. F., at 11 :00. 

8. Psychological Research. Work arranged with individual students. 

Professor Lindley and Assistant Professor Haggerty. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, at hours to be arranged. 
30. Seminary in Applied Psychology. A survey of psychological prin- 
ciples in relation chiefly to business enterprise and industrial pro- 
cesses, and incidentally to various trades and professions. Pro- 
fessor Lindley and Assistant Professor Haggerty, 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, two hours a week. 



DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS. 

Schuyler C. Davisson, Professor. 
David A. Rothrock, Professor. 
Plysses S. Hainna, Associate Professor. 
Robert D. Carmichael, Assistant Professor. 

The graduate courses at present offered by the Department lead 
to the A.M. and Ph.D. degrees. 

The library of the Department, consisting of about 2,300 bound 
volumes, is located in Room 36, Wylie Hall. The library is open 
from 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m.. for use by students pursuing ad- 



34 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

vanced work in mathematics. The collection of mathematical books 
consists of the more important English, "French, and German texts 
and treatises, the collected works of Abel, Bernoulli, Cauchy, Cay- 
ley, Clifford, DeMorgan, Gauss, Jacohi, Lagrange, Lie, Mobius, Kie- 
mann, Schwartz, Smith, Steiner, and Weierstrass, together with the 
following sets of periodicals: 

Acta Mathematica. Stockholm, Berlin, Paris. 1882 to date. 

Akademie der Wissenschaften, Sitzungsberichte, Math. — Naturwiss. Klasse. 

Vienna. Current numbers. 
Akademie der Wissenschaften, Math. — Phys. Klasse. Berlin. Current 

numbers. 
Akademie van Wetensehappen. Verhandelingen. Amsterdam. Current 

numbers. 
American Journal of Mathematics. Baltimore. 1878 to date. 
American Mathematical Monthly. Springfield, Mo. 1884 to date. 
Analyst (The). Des Moines, la. 1874-1883. Complete. 
Annali di Matematica. Milan. Current numbers. 
Annals of Mathematics. Charlottesville, Va., and Cambridge, Mass. 1884 

to date. 
Annales scientifiques de l'Ecole Normale Superieure. Paris. 1864 to date. 
Archiv der Matheinatik und Physik. Leipzig. 1841 to date. 
Archiv for Mathematik og Naturvidenskab. Christiania. Current num- 
bers. 
Atti della Reale Accademia dei Lincei. Rome. Current numbers. 
Bibliotheca Mathematica. Leipzig. Current numbers. 
Bulletin de la Societe mathematique de France. Paris. 1872 to date. 
Bulletin de la Societe physico-mathematique de Kasan. Kasan. Current 

numbers. 
Bulletin des Sciences mathematiques. Paris. 1S70 to date. 
Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society. New York. 1894 to date. 
Bulletin of the New York Mathematical Society. New York. 1891-1894. 

Complete. 
Cambridge Mathematical Journal. Cambridge. 1837-1845. Complete. 
Cambridge and Dublin Mathematical Journal. Cambridge. 1846-1854. 

< 'miiplete. 
Educational Times (Mathematical Reprints from the). London. 1863 to 

date. 
Giornale <li Matematiche <li Battaglini. Naples. Current numbers. 
II Bulletino ili Matematico. Bologna. Current numbers. 
Jahrbucb liber <ii<> Portschritte dor Mathematik. Berlin. 1868 to date. 
Jahresbericht dor deutschen Mathematiker-Vereinigung. Leipzig. 1892 to 

date. 
Journal do l'Ecole Polytechnique. Paris. 1795 to date. 
Journal do Mathematiques pures et appliqu6es (Liouville). Paris. 1836 

to date. 
Journal fur die reine und angewandte Mathematik (Crelle). Berlin. 182(5 

to date. 
^'Education Mathematique. Paris. Current numbers. 



GttAfctfATtt SCHOOL 35 

I.'Knseignement Mathematique. Geneve. Current numbers. 

i.'Intermediaire des Mathematiciens. Paris. Current numbers. 

Mathematical Monthly (The). Cambridge, Mass. 1859-1861. Complete. 

Mathematical Magazine. Washington. 1882-1884. 

Mathematical Gazette. London. 1896 to date. 

Mathematical Messenger (The). Ada, Louisiana. 1887-1894. 

Mathematical Review. Worcester. 1890-1897. Complete. 

Mathematical Visitor. Erie, Pa. 1877-1883. Complete. 

Mathematische Annalen. Leipzig. 1869 to date. 

Mathematische und naturwissenschaftliche Berichte aus Ungarn. Leipzig. 
Current numbers. 

Mathesis. Ghent. 1881 to date. 

Messenger of Mathematics (The Oxford, Cambridge and Dublin). Cam- 
bridge. 1802-1871. Complete. 

Messenger of Mathematics (The). London and Cambridge. 1872 to date. 

Mitteilungen der Mathematischen Gesellschaft in Hamburg. Leipzig. Cur- 
rent numbers. 

Monatshefte fur Mathematik und Physik. Vienna. Current numbers. 

Municipal Journal of Engineering. New York. 1905 to date. 

Naehrichten von der Koniglichen Gesellschaft der Wissenschaften zu Got- 
tingen : Mathematisch-physikalische Klasse. Berlin. 1873 to date. 

Nouvelles Annales de Mathematiques. Paris. Current numbers. 

Nyt Tidsskrift for Matematik. Copenhagen. Current i umbers. 

Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society. Edinburgh. 1883 to 
date. 

Proceedings of the Indiana Academy of Science. Indianapolis. 1891 tj 
date. 

Proceedings of the London Mathematical Society. London. 1865 to date. 

Proceedings of the Mathematical-physical Society of Tokyo. Tokyo. Cur- 
rent numbers. 

Quarterly Journal of Mathematics, Pure and Applied. London. 1S57 V; 
date. 

Rendiconti del Circolo Matematico di Palermo. 1884 to date. 

lievista de la Sociedad Matematica Espanola. Madrid. 1911 to date. 

Revue de Mathematiques Speciales, Paris. Current numbers. 

Revue Semestrielle des Publications mathematiques. Amsterdam. 1893 
to date. 

Sachsische Gesellschaft der Wissenschaften. Berichte. Mathematisch- 
Physikalische Klasse. Leipzig. Current numbers. 

Science. New York and Lancaster. 1908 to date. 

Sitzungsberichte der Berliner mathematischen Gesellschaft. Berlin. Cur- 
rent numbers. 

Transactions of the American Mathematical Society. New York. 1900 to 
date. 

Unterrichtsblatter fur Mathematik und Naturwissenschaften. Berlin. 
Current numbers. 

Zeitschrift fur Mathematik und Physik. Leipzig. Current numbers. 

Zeitschrift fur mathematischen und naturwissenschaftlichen Unterricht. 
Leipzig. Current numbers. 



36 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY 



Following: are the courses open to graduate students in the De- 
partment. The more elementary courses are not here listed; for 
these see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under that 
heading in this catalogue. 

21. Functions of a Complex Variable. The fundamental operations, con- 
formal representation, sterographic projection and mapping upon 
the Riemann sphere, many-valued functions, Riemann surfaces. 
Lectures and reports. Six hours' credit. Professor Davissox. 
Two hours a week, throughout the year. 

[24. Elliptic Integrals and Elliptic Functions. Discussion of elliptic in- 
tegrals of the three kinds; addition theorems, Jacobi's geo- 
metrical proof of addition theorem ; Landen's transformation ; 
applications. Four hours' credit. Associate Professor Hanna.] 
Fall and Winter terms, two days a week. 
Omitted in 1912-1913. 

[41. Contact Transformations. A study of Lie's 'Beriihrungs-Transfor- 
mationen', including the geometry of the plane, the geometry of 
the line-elements of space, and the theory of Pfaff's and Monge's 
equations. Six hours' credit. Professor Rothbock.] 
Fall and Winter terms, three days a week. 
Omitted in 1912-1913. 

52. Partial Differential Equations, Existence theorems, second order 

equations, the Fredholm integral equation, boundary value prob- 
lems, the partial differential equations of physics. Assistant 
Professor Cabmichael. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, three hours a week. 

53. Functions of an Infinite Number of Variables. Finite and infinite 

determinants, finite and infinite systems of linear equations, 
geometry in space of an infinite number of dimensions, integral 
equations, and expansions of functions. Assistant Professor 
Cabmichael. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, three hours a week. 

20d. Difference 1 Equations. An advanced course. The work will consist 
principally of reports by students on assigned portions of the 
literature of difference equations. Assistant Professor Cab- 
miciiaii, 
Hours and credit to be arranged. 

[51. Linear Differential Equations. Existence theorems, function-theo- 
retic character of the solutions, special equations, oscillation 
properties, boundary-value and expansion problems. Lectures 
and reports. Assistant Professor Cabmichael. 
Three hours ;i week, throughout the year; and daily, Summer term, 

L912.] 
Omitted in 1912-1913. 



<;i; UU'ATK SCHOOL 37 

lv Higher Geometry. Higher plane curves; algebraic surfaces; modern 
analytic geometry. Coordinate systems, elementary transforma- 
tions, polar systems, and a general study of algebraic curves and 
surfaces. Professor Rothbock. 
Summer. Fall, and Winter terms, three hours a week. 
I .'!<>. Theory of Surfaces. Lectures, assigned readings, and reports upon 
the general theory of surfaces and twisted curves; singularities 
of surfaces, asymptotic curves, lines of curvature, geodesic lines, 
and differential geometry are studied. Professor Davisson.] 
Omitted in 1912-13. 
39. Theory of Substitutions. Associate Professor Hanna. 

Fall term, three hours a week. 
25. Theory of Errors. Associate Professor Hanna. 

Winter term, three hours a week. 
24. Theory of Functions of a Real Variable. Professor Davisson. 
[45. Calculus of Variations. Professor Rothrock. 
Fall and Winter terms, three hours a week.] 
Omitted in 1912-13. 
49. Infinitesimal Analysis. An introduction to the theory of functions o * 
a real variable. Assistant Professor Carmichael. 
Summer term, 1912, three hours a week. 

DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICS AND ASTRONOMY 

Wilbur A. Cogshall, Associate Professor of Astronomy. 
David A. Drew, Instructor in Mechanics and Astronomy. 

Kirkwood Observatory, completed in 1900, is occupied by the 
Department. The building contains a library and computing 
room; a lecture room; dark room; a transit room, in which are a 
Bamberg universal instrument, a PJoward sidereal clock, a mean 
time chronometer, and a chronograph ; a dome twenty-six feet in 
diameter ; and a room of the same size immediately below. In the 
dome is the refracting telescope, of which the 12-inch objective is 
by Brashear, and the mounting by Warner and Swasey, of Cleve- 
land. The instrument has a focal length of about 15 feet, and is 
supplied with eyepieces magnifying from 130 to nearly 1,000 
diameters; also with polarizing helioscope, diagonal eyepiece, and 
an electrically illuminated micrometer; there are both coarse and 
fine circles in right ascension and declination, the fine circles having 
reading microscope and electrical illumination. 

The Department has in a separate building, a mounting, de- 
signed and built by the Department, that carries a 4-inch Brown- 
ing refractor, a 5-inch portrait lens and an 8-inch parabolic mirror, 
for the photography of comets, nebula}, etc. 

For an account of the Lawrence Fellowship in Astronomy, see 
page 14. 



38 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

The Department receives telegraphic bulletins of discoveries 
made at American and European observatories. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the De- 
partment. The more elementary courses are not here listed; for 
these see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under that 
heading in the University catalogue. 

14. Orbits of Spectroscopic Binaries. Associate Professor Cogshall. 
Winter term, T. Th., at 2 :00. 
8. Theoretical Mechanics. Mr. Drew. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 9:00. 
35. Celestial Mechanics. An introductory course. Mr. Drew. 
Spring term. M. W. F., at 11:00. 
Open to students who have passed in Course 7. 
12. Theoretical Astronomy. Integration of equations of. motion ; com- 
putation of orbits and ephemerides. Mr. Drew. 
Fall term. Hours and credit to be arranged with each student. 
18. Astronomical llesearch. A limited number of students will be per- 
mitted to undertake research work under the supervision of the 
Department. The equipment is best suited for work in astro- 
nomy of precision and celestial photography. Associate Profes- 
sor Cogshall and Mr. Drew. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms. Hours and credit arranged with 
each student. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS 

Arthur L. Foley, Professor. 

Rolla R. Ramsey, Associate Professor. 

The Department offers a full course leading to the degree of 
Ph.D. 

The supply of apparatus for the presentation of courses in 
modern experimental plrysics is fairly complete. The equipment 
and facilities for work have been largely increased during the past 
three years, especially in the way of delicate instruments and ac- 
curate standards for advanced study. 

The Library of the Department of Physics contains about six 
hundred volumes, exclusive of sets of several journals. The fol- 
lowing magazines are on file: 'Annalen der Physik', 'Annales de 
Chimie e1 de Physique', 'Beiblatter zu den Annalen der Physik', 
'Physikalische Zeitschrift , J 'The Electrical World and Engineer', 
'The Electrician' (London), 'Journal de Physique', 'The Philo- 
sophical Magazine 7 , 'The Physical Review', 'The Proceedings of 
the Physical Society of London', 'The Proceedings of the Royal 
Society'. 'Le Radium' 'School Science and Mathematics', 'Science 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 39 

Abstracts' (A and B), 'Scientific American and Supplement', 'The 
Western Electrician'. ' Gassier 's Magazine', and 'The Manual 
Training Magazine*. Students have access also to the journals on 
file in the general library, and in the libraries of other Depart- 
ments. Of these may be named: 'The American Journal of 
Science', 'The Astrophysical Journal ', 'The Engineering and Min- 
ing Journal'. 'The Engineering Magazine', 'Nature', 'Comptes 
Kendus', and 'Science'. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the De- 
partment. The more elementary courses are not here listed; for 
these see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under that 
heading in the University catalogue. 

12. The Electromagnetic Theory of Light. Professor Foley. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 9:00. 

Wood. 'Optics'. 

13. Advanced Mathematical Electricity. Associate Professor Ramsey. 
Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 8:00. 

v Wehster, 'Electricity and Magnetism'. 
34. Sound. Mathematical and physical properties of the vibration of 
sonnd-producing bodies, such as strings, rods, plates, air columns, 
membranes, etc. Assistant Professor Dutcher. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 10:00. 

166. Laboratory Practice in Spectroscopy and Photometry- Associate 
Professor Ramsey. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 2:00. 

14. Advanced Laboratory Methods and Research. Professor Foley. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, at 1 :00. 

22. Current Physical Literature. Professor Foley. 

Two hours a week throughout the year, at an hour to be appointed. 
30. Advanced Theoretical Physics. A critical study of standard trea- 
tises and memoirs. Professor Foley. 

Two hours a week, at a time to be appointed. 



DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

Robert E. Lyons, Professor. 

Louis S. Davis, Professor. 

Oliver W. Brown, Associate Professor. 

Frank C. Mathers, Assistant Professor. 

Clarence E. May, Assistant Professor. 

Alpheus R. Nees, Teaching Fellow. 

The Department of Chemistry has general, special, and private 
laboratories, a laboratory room, a lecture room, balance rooms, an 
incubator room, a stock room, museum, etc. Special laboratories 



40 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

are provided for electrochemistry, assaying and electric furnace 
work, organic, inorganic and physiological chemistry, water and 
gas analysis, spectroscopic analysis. The lahoratories comprise 
eleven large, well-lighted rooms, equipped with workstands, capahle 
of accommodating two hundred and seventy-five students. Each 
room is provided with fume hoods and air tight registers connected 
with a ventilating fan for the removal of offensive and poisonous 
gases. 

The general equipment for graduate work, including laboratory 
and library facilities, has been materially increased during the 
past year. 

Special attention is given to inorganic, organic, physiological, 
and physical chemistry and to electrochemistry, technical analyti- 
cal chemistry, and electro-metal lurgy. 

The graduate work of the Department, leading to the degree 
A.M. and Ph.D., comprises advanced laboratory, lecture, library 
and seminary work in the lines indicated above, and special grad- 
uate courses described below. A thesis embodying original investi- 
gation is required for an advanced degree. 

The laboratories for advanced work and the departmental li- 
brary are open from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. There are no classes 
in the laboratories; each student works independently. A five- 
hoar laboratory ccurss requires two and one-half actual hours of 
laboratory work daily. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in this De- 
partment. The more elementary courses are not here listed; for 
these see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under that 
heading in the University catalogue. 

10. Physical Chemistry. Laboratory work. Associate Professor Brown. 

22. Electrochemistry- Associate Professor Brown and Mr. Nees. 
Winter term. (.1) Lectures, T. Th., at 8:00. (B) Laboratory, M. W. 

F.. 1 :00 to 1 :•",(». 

23. Electrochemistry. Associate Professor Brown and Mr. Nees. 
Spring term. (A) Lectures, T. Th., al 8:00. (B) Laboratory, M. W. 

I - ., 1 :00 to I :50. 
29. Storage Batteries. Lectures and laboratory work. Associate Pro- 
fessor Bbowm and .Mr. Nees. 
Pall term. 
13. Elemeiitary Metallurgy and Assaying. Lectures and laboratory 
work. Associate Professor Bjjown and Mr. Nees. 
Fall term. Lectures, T. Th., ;it 8:00; laboratory work. F. S., 8:00 t.. 
11 :.-0 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 41 

15, Advanced Technical and Engineering Analysis. Laboratory work. 
Assistant Professor MATHERS. 

Spring term, daily. 

32. Gas and Fuel Analysis. Lectures and laboratory work. Assistant 

Professor Mathers. 
Winter term, three hours a week. 

33. Spectrum Analysis and Sugar Analysis. Lectures and laboratory 

work. Assistant Professor Mathers. 
Fall term, two hours a week. 

2(5. Chemical Engineering. Associate Professor Brown. 

Fall term. Lectures, M. W. F., at 8:00. 
14. Seminary. Reports on current literature and special topics. (1) 
Fall term : Inorganic Chemistry, Assistant Professor Mathers. 
(2) Winter term: Organic Chemistry. Professor Lyons and 
Assistant Professor May. (3) Spring term: Electrochemistry 
and Industrial Chemistry. Associate Professor Brown and As- 
sistant Professor May. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, Th., at 7 :00 p.m. 
12a. Research in Organic or Physiological Chemistry. Professor Lyons 
and Assistant Professor May. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 8:00 to 5:00. 
12&. Research in the Chemistry of the Alkaloids. Professor Davis. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 8:00 to 5:00. 
12c. Research in Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry. Associate 
Professor Brown. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 8:00 to 5:00. 
12d. Research in Inorganic Chemistry. Assistant Professor Mathers. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 8:00 to 5:00. 
18c. Advanced Physical Chemistry. Lectures on selected chapters of 
Physical Chemistry. Associate Professor Brown. 
Spring term, T. Th., at an hour to be arranged. 

24. Advanced Electrochemistry and Electro-Metallurgy. (A) Lectures 

on the design and operation of commercial electric furnaces and 
on electric furnace processes and products. (B) Advanced lab 
oratory work and research in pure and applied electrochemistry 
and electro-metallurgy, including, investigations in electric fur- 
nace work, refining and extraction of metals, electro-synthesis 
of organic and inorganic compounds, manufacture of storage 
batteries, and of industrial electrochemical processes. Associate 
Professor Brown and Mr. Nees. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms. Laboratory work, daily, 8 :00 to 
4:50; lectures, Winter term, F., at 8:00. 

Students in this course are recommended to take Physics 10 and 24. 

25. Advanced Organic Chemistry. A continuation of Course 6. (A.) 

Lectures and recitations on selected chapters of organic chem- 
istry. (B) Laboratory work or research in synthetic or ana- 
lytical organic chemistry. Assistant Professor May. 



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DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY 

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U>1 \ i i SCHOOL 1> 

of lenses for a wide range of work, is available as an aid in the 
proper illustration of paleontologifial material. 

The Popart raent receives the principal American, ami European, 
periodicals dealing with geology, paleontology, and geography. 

K.illnw iiiL r are the coupes open to graduate students in the IV 
partment The more elementary courses are not hore Listed; for 
the bulletin o\ the College o\ liberal \v\<. or under that 
heading in the rniversity catalogue. 

■3. Bconomic Geology, a discussion of the non-metallic materials, such 
ays, cement, coal, oil ami gas, buildim; stones, etc, As 
late Professor Bbeoi 
Winter term, daily, at 10:00. 
systematic Paleontology. Laboratory study of fossil invertebrates 

Professor Ci iunos and Associate Professor U\\ ih. 
Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, two to five hours, at times to be 
arranged. 
5a. Evolution. A study of the geologic factors In evolution: the origin 
of the oldest faunas: age ^*i the earth, etc. Professor Ol KINGS 
Winter term, at an hour to be arranged. 
LOl Research. Investigation of geological and paleontologies! prob- 
lems. A carefnl report on each investigation is required, in 
proper farm for publication. Professor Cuhings and Associate 
Professor Bi \ de. 
Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, daily. 9:00 to i:50, 
Advanced Field Work. Continuous work in the field for a month 
or more in the summer, fall, or spring. This course will usually 
f«»nn part of the research work submitted for an advanced de 
The work must be largely Independent, but will always 
be under the general oversight o\ a member of the department 
[14. Stratigraphic Geology. A study of the literature o\ the various 
•ins. The history of their investigation, and the 
present knowledge Of their divisions, distribution, faunas, and 
paleogeography will be fully considered. Professor Ci kings. 
Fall. Winter, and Spring terms. Lectures, T. Th., at L0:00.] 
Omitted in 1912-13. 

DEPARTMENT OE BOTANY 

I > w in M. Mni i ii k. Professor. 

I'l.wi; M. Andrews, Associate Professor 

James m. Van Hook. Assistant Professor. 

Graduate work leading to the degree of Master of Arts in 

M\- comprises special studies along some line indicated in the 

advanced courses enumerated below, or the investigation of some 

problem of a more limited scope. For the degree of Doctor of 



44 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

Philosophy, the subject of the thesis is selected from some line of 
morphology, cytology, physiology, or mycology. Space is provided 
for four students, and for the work undertaken the equipment is 
adequate. 

The departmental library contains the more necessary works of 
reference, and the principal botanical journals. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the De- 
partment. The more elementary courses are not here listed; for 
these see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under that 
heading in the University catalogue. 

4. Morphology of Fungi. Assistant Professor Van Hook. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 1 :00 to 3 :00. 

5. Physiology. Associate Professor Andrews. 
Winter and Spring terms, daily. 

6. Cytology. Professor Mottieb. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily. 
5a. Research in Physiology. Special studies will be offered to those pur- 
suing work for advanced degrees 1 . Associate Professor An- 
drews. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily. 

7. Research in Morphology and Cytology. Problems for special in- 

vestigation in morphology and cytology will be assigned to stu- 
dents who are prepared to undertake original work. Professor 
Mottieb. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily. 
13. Morphology of the Algae. A study of the life-history and of the 
development of vegetative and reproductive organs in certain 
algae. The work is confined very largely to fresh-water forms. 
Professor Mottier. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily. 
18. Investigations in Mycology and Plant Pathology. Assistant Profes- 
sor Van Hook. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 1:00 to 3:00. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY 

Carl H. Eigenmann, Professor and Director of the Biological Station. 
*Febnandus Payne, Assistant Professor. 
WILL SCOTT, Assistant Professor. 

Pull work Leading to the degree Ph.D is offered in Course 6. 
It is purely a research course, and offers the widest choice of sub- 
jects permitted by the equipment of the Department. 

The subjects selected have radiated from two centers. One of 
these is the problem, or problems, of the freshwater fauna of trop- 



..n leave from March I, 1912, to .1. 



QBADUATE SCHOOL 45 

ical America. At present the Department is engaged in a study of 
divergent evolution as shown by the tropical American characin 
fishes. 

The Department is well equipped for this work. The most im- 
portant of the zoological collections is the collection of fishes, com- 
prising many thousand specimens. Arrangements have been made 
for cooperation with various other institutions, by which the largest 
aggregation in the world of collections of South American fresh- 
water fishes is available for the monographs in preparation. By 
special arrangement the collections of Harvard University, made 
by Professor L. Agassiz and his assistants during the Thayer ex- 
pedition, and by others, are available for the monograph on the 
American Characins. 

The Department has entered into close relations with the Car- 
negie Museum of Pittsburg. Under the direction of Dr. W. J. 
Holland, director of this Museum, Mr. John Haseman, A.M., '07, 
during 1907-1910, explored the coast rivers of Brazil, Uraguay, and 
Argentina, between the Rio San Francisco and Buenos Aires. He 
ascended the Rio Paraguay, crossed to the Guapore and descended 
that river and the Rio Madeira to Manaos, on the Amazon, making- 
collections on the way. 

From August to December, 1908, Professor Eigenmann, with 
Mr. S. E. Shideler as volunteer assistant, explored the Demerara, 
Essequibo, and Potaro rivers of British Guiana. Very extensive 
collections were made in the lowland, as well as above the Kaie- 
teur, a vertical fall of 741 feet of the Potaro river. The results of 
the expedition are being published by the Carnegie Museum as 
reports of the British Guiana Expedition of Indiana University 
and the Carnegie Museum. The final report on the fishes is in 
press. 

From January to April, 1912, Professor Eigenmann made col- 
lections along the Atrato, Cauca, and Magdalena rivers in Colombia. 

The second center of departmental interest has been, and is, the 
subject of heredity, especially: (A) The history of the Sex Cells, 
(B) Variation, (C) The rate of ontogenic and phylogenic modifi- 
cation of the sense organs of Cave Animals, (D) Experimental 
Zoology. 

For the study of cave animals (C) the facilities of the Depart- 
ment are ideal. The University is located at the edge of the great 
cave region. By act of the Legislature, the Donaldson estate near 
Mitchell, Indiana, has been placed in the keeping of the trustees of 
Indiana University. On it are situated numerous sinkholes, dry 



46 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

caves, and an underground water-course at least two miles long. 
This underground river is rich in blind fishes and other blind 
aquatic animals. A small laboratory has been erected on the farm, 
and is in charge of a research fellow, appointed from year to year. 
In the study of cave animals the Department has in the past had 
the cooperation of the Carnegie Institution, the American Associa- 
tion for the Advancement of Science, and the Elizabeth Thompson 
Science Fund. 

For the study of variation (B) in non-migratory vertebrates in 
a 'unit of environment' this Department organized and has since 
maintained a fresh-water Biological Station. It is at present lo- 
cated on Winona Lake, Kosciusko County, Indiana, in the grounds 
of the Winona Assembly. The Station owns, as a gift of the 
Winona Assembly, two buildings, 20 x 45 feet, each two stories high. 
The buildings are on the lake front, at the mouth of Cherry Creek. 
The Station also owns boats, nets, sounding and temperature ap- 
paratus, glassware, etc. Microscopes and other needed apparatus 
are moved to the Station from the University. 

For the study of sex cells (A), and Experimental Zoology (D), 
the Department owns all the necessary apparatus and the surround- 
ings of the University offer an abundance of material. The De- 
partment also owns a collection gathered in the vicinities of Jack- 
son, Miss., Salt Lake City, Los Angeles, Tucson, El Paso, and San 
Antonio. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the De- 
partment. The more elementary courses are not here listed; for 
these see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under that 
heading in the University catalogue. 

3. Advanced Zoology. Professor Eigenmann and Assistant Professors 

Payne and Scott. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, five hours a week. 

4. General Biological Problems: (A) The development of the idea of 

evolution and Darwinism; (/?) The laws of heredity. Professor 

ElGENMANN. 

Spring term, daily, at 9:00. 

5. Seminary. Weekly meetings of advanced students and instructors to 

discuss current literature and report on investigations in 
progress. Professor Eigenmann and Assistant Professor Payne. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M., at 4:00. 
<;. Research. Special Investigation of zoological problems, with a re- 
port on each investigation. Branches in which subjects have in 
the past been selected and reported upon are Variation, Degen- 
eration, Regeneration. Sense Organs, Embryology, Faunal and 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 47 

Systematic Studies of Fishes. Ecology of Cave and Freshwater 
Animals. Cell and Chromosome studies. For a fuller statement, 
see the general statement of the Department. Professor Eigen- 
mann and Assistant Professor Payne. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, S :00 to 4 :50. 

Biological Survey. A continuation of the previous work in the 
physical and biological features of Winona Lake and its en- 
virons. Professor Eigenmann. 

Summer term, at the Biological Station. 



DEPARTMENT OF ANATOMY 

Burton D. Myers, Professor. 
Augustus G. Pohlman, Professor. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the De- 
partment. The more elementary courses are not here listed; for 
these see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under that 
heading in the University catalogue. 

IS. Research Work. Opportunity for research work is offered to ad- 
vanced students who may have at least one-half their time for 
one year free for the work. Professors Myers and Pohlman. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, at hours to be appointed. 
35. Advanced Course in Anatomy. Open to students who have com- 
pleted the dissection of the human body, Course 8, and de- 
sire to do special or advanced work. Professors Myers and 
Pohlman. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, at hours to be appointed. 



PHYSIOLOGY 

William J. Moenkhaus, Professor. 

Facilities for research leading to the higher degrees are avail- 
able within restricted lines in general physiology. 

Fallowing are the courses open to graduate students in the De- 
partment. The more elementary courses are not here listed; for 
these see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under that 
heading in the University catalogue. 

6. Advanced Physiology. Professor Moenkhaus. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, at hours to be arranged. 
10. Research. Problem work in certain phases of general physiology 
may be taken by those properly equipped. Professor Moenkhaus. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily. 8 :00 to 4 :50. 



48 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

EDUCATION 

Walter A. Jessup, Dean of the School of Education, and Professor of 

School Administration. 
William W. Black, Professor of Elementary Education. 
Elmer E. Jones, Professor of the History and Philosophy of Education. 
Henry Lester Smith, Lecturer on Education. 

Graduate work is offered in the School of Education, and 
special programs leading to the A.M. and Ph.D. degrees, with the 
Master's and Doctor's certificates of Education, will be arranged 
on application. 

A student whose undergraduate major was in another depart- 
ment will usually be given opportunity to do in one year the work 
for the A.M. degree in Education. The work will include such 
undergraduate courses in Education as may be necessary as a basis 
for graduate work. 

In the future, as in the past, the best work of students in the 
courses in research work will be published. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the 
School. The more elementary courses are not here listed ; for these 
or for fuller statements of the courses below, see the bulletin of the 
School of Education, or under that heading in the University 
catalogue. 

8. Secondary Education in Germany, France, and England. Professor 
Jessup. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 9:00. 
6. History of Education. Professor Jones. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 8 :00. 
10. Philosophy of Education. Professor Jones. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 8:00. 
15. School Administration. Professor Jessup. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 10:00. 
16a. Educational Seminary. Professor Jones. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T.. at 7:00 p.m. 
16&. Seminary in Social Education. Professor Jessup. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, W.. at 7:00 p.m. 
16c. Educational Seminary. Elementary Education. Professor Black. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M., at 7:00 p.m. 
17. Advanced Lducational Psychology. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 0:00. 
!). Orthogenics. Professor Jon is. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 3:00. 
il. Principles of Organization and Supervision. Development of the law 
and principles thai control the organization and conduct of the 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 49 

school. The law evolving the school. The curriculum under its 
logical and psychological aspects; the basis for making a course 
of study ; comparison of typical courses. Universal method in 
teaching. The organization of a subject. The organic relation of 
the logical, esthetic, and ethical ends in education. Professor 
Black. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 10:00. 
Open to Graduate students, and to teachers of wide experience. 
IS. Research in Education. 

a. The Problems of the Elementary School. Professor Black. 

b. The History and Philosophy of Education. Professor Jones. 

c. The Psychology of the Processes of Education. 

d. Secondary Education. Professor Jessup. 

e. School Administration. Professor Jessup. 
Problems and hours to be arranged with professors in charge. 



Indiana University comprises the following schools: 

The College of Liberal Arts, 
The School of Education, 
The Graduate School, 
The School of Law, 
The School of Medicine. 

The following publications are issued annually by the Uni- 
versity : 

The University Catalogue, 
The Spring Term Bulletin, 
The Summer Term Bulletin, 
Bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, 
Bulletin of the School of Education, 
Bulletin of the Graduate School, 
Bulletin of the School of Law, 
Bulletin of the School of Medicine. 

Any of these publications will be sent free upon application to 
The Registrar, Indiana University. 

Bloomington, Indiana. 



Vol. XI, No. 2 



April 15, 1913 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY 
BULLETIN 




GRADUATE SCHOOL 
1913 



Entered as second-class mail matter May 16, 1908, at the post-offlce at Bloomington, 
Indiana, under act of Congress of July 16, 1894 



Contents 



PAGE 

Prefatory Note 5 

( ►] i k ers and Faculty of the Graduate Schooi 7 

General Statement of the Graduate School — 

Purpose and Administration 9 

Admission 9 

Fees 10 

The Library 10 

Degrees — 

Master of Arts 11 

Master of Science 12 

Doctor of Philosophy 12 

Application for Degrees 13 

Fellowships — 

Teaching Fellowships 13 

Donaldson Fellowship in Zoology 13 

Lawrence Fellowship in Astronomy 13 

Fellowships for Graduates of other Indiana Colleges 14 

Research Fellowships 14 

Special Rule concerning Fellows 15 

University Organizations — 

The Graduate Club 15 

Sigma Xi 15 

Phi Beta Kappa 15 

Departmental Clubs 15 

Departments and Graduate Courses, 1913-14 — - 

Greek 16 

Latin 18 

Romance Languages 20 

German 21 

Comparative Philology 23 

English 25 

History and Political Science 27 

Economics and Social Science 30 

Philosophy 31 

Mathematics 32 

Mechanics and Astronomy 35 

Physics 36 

Chemistry 37 

Geology 39 

Botany 41 

Zoology 42 

Anatomy 45 

Physiology 45 

Education 46 

Register of Students, 1912-13 47 

(3) 



University Calendar 



SUMMER TERM, 1913 



June 19, Thursday. 
June 20, Friday. 



July 30, Wednesday. 
July 31, Thursday. 



Sept. 3, Wednesday. 



Registration and enrollment for the 

Summer term. 
Recitations and lectures begin for the 

First half-term. (Instruction five 

days a week.) 
First half-term ends. 
Recitations and lectures begin for 

Second half-term. (Instruction six 

days a week. 
Summer term ends. 



FALL TERM, 1913-14 



Sept. 25, Thursday. 

Sept. 26, Friday. 

Nov. 27 and 28, Thursday and Friday. 

Dec. 19, Friday. 



Registration and enrollment in classes 

for the Fall term. 
Recitations and lectures begin. 
Thanksgiving recess. 
Fall term ends. 



WINTER TERM, 1913-14 



Jan. 2, Friday. 

Jan. 5, Monday. 

Jan. 20, Tuesday. 

Mar. 26, Thursday, 6 p. m. 



Registration and enrollment in classes 

for the Wintern term. 
Recitations and lectures begin. 
Foundation day, a holiday. 
Winter term ends. 



SPRING TERM, 1913-14 



Apr. 1, Wednesday. 



Apr. 1, Thursday. 

June 20, Saturday, />. m. 

June 24, Wednesday. 



Registration and enrollment in classes 

for the Spring term. 
Recitations and lectures begin. 
Spring term ends. 
University Commencement . 



(4) 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



VOL. XI BLOOMINGTON, IND , APRIL 15, 1913 NO. 2 

Entered as second-class mail matter May 16, 1908, at the post-office at Bloomington, 
Indiana, under the Act of July 16, 1894. Published from the University office, Bloom- 
ington, Indiana, semi-monthly April. May, and June, and monthly January, February, 
March. July, September, and November. 



Prefatory Note 



Indiana University, situated at Bloomington, is the State Uni- 
versity of Indiana and the head of the public school system of the 
State. It takes its origin from the State Seminary, which was 
established by aet of the Legislature, approved January 20. 1820. 
In 1828 the title of the Seminary was changed by the Legislature 
to that of the Indiana College; and in 1838 the University was 
given its present name. In 1867 Indiana University became coedu- 
cational. 

The University comprises the following schools: 

The College of Liberal Arts, organized in 1828, 

The School of Law, organized in 1842, re-organized in 1889, 

The School of Medicine, organized in 1903, 

The Graduate School, organized in 1904. 

The School of Education, organized in 1908. 

The first advanced degrees, conferred for graduate work, were 
granted in 1882. During the eighties, well defined regulations for 
graduate work and graduate degrees were stated in the University 
catalogue, and a considerable number of graduate students were 
enrolled, especially in the natural sciences. In the years 1882 to 
1893. inclusive, the University graduated 14 Doctors of Philosophy, 
99 Masters of Arts, and 12 Masters of Science. For some years 
following 1893, however, the degree of Doctor of Philosophy was 
not conferred. 

In 1904 there took place the segregation and a, formal organ- 
ization of the Graduate School, and in 1908 the office of Dean of 
the Graduate School was created. 

This number of the Bulletin is devoted to setting forth the 
facilities for graduate work in the several departments of the Uni- 
versity. Courses intended primarily for graduate students are 

2-327 8 (5) 



b INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

described in full. Brief announcements are given of courses in- 
tended for both graduates and undergraduates. For further de- 
scription of the latter courses, see the bulletin of the College of 
Liberal Arts, or under that heading in the University catalogue 

The attention of graduates of other Indiana Colleges is invited 
to the announcement on page 14 of ten fellowships recently estab- 
lished by the Board oi: Trustees, for such students. The value of 
these felloAvships is $200 each; they also carry with them exemp- 
tion from contingent and library fees. For further information 
concerning the Graduate School, address. 

The Dean op the Gradtate School, 

Bloomington, Indiana. 



Officers and Faculty of the Graduate 

School 



COUNCIL 
Carl H Eigenmann, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology, Dean of the Graduate 

School. 

James Albert Woodburn, Ph.D., LIaD., Professor of American History 
and Politics. 

Robert Edward Lyons, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Arthur Lee Foley, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 

Ai. 1:11:1 Frederick Kuersteiner, Ph.D., Professor of Romance Languages. 

Ulysses Grant Weathfrly, Ph.D.. Litt.D.. Professor of Economics and 
Social Science. 

Ernest Hiram Lindley, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy and Psychology. 

Burton Dork Myers, A.M.. M.D.. Professor of Anatomy. 

Bert John Vos, Ph.D.. Professor of German. 

Schuyler Colfax Dayisson, Sc.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

William J Moenkhaus, Ph.D., Professor of Physiology. 

Will David Howe, Ph.D.. Professor of English. 

Elmer Ellsworth Jones, Ph.D., Professor of the History and Philosophy 
of Education. 

Edgar Roscoe Cumincs, Ph.D., Professor of Geology. 

Frank William Tilden, A.M.. Associate Professor of Greek. 

Lillian Gay Berry, A.M.. Associate Professor of Latin. 

Wilbur Adelman Cogshall, A.M., Associate Professor of Astronomy. 

Guibo Herman Stem pel, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Comparative Phi- 
lology. 

James M Van Hook, A.M., Assistant Professor of Botany. 

FACULTY 

William Lowe Bryan, Ph.D., LL.D., President of the University. 

Horace Addison Hoffman, A.M., Professor of Greek. 

James Albert Woodburn, Ph.D., LL.D.. Professor of American History 
and Politics. 

Carl H Eigenmann, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology, and Director of the 
Biological Station. 

Robert Edward Lyons. Ph.D.. Professor of Chemistry. 

Arthur Lee Foley Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 

David Myers Mother, Ph.D., Professor of Botany. 

Albert Frederick Ki ersteiner, Ph.D., Professor of Romance Languages. 

Ulysses Grant Weatherly, Ph.D., Litt.D., Professor of Economics and 
Social Science. 

Ernest Hiram Lindley, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy and Psychology. 

Burton Dorr Myers, A.M., M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

Samuel Bannister Harding, Ph.D., Professor of European History. 

Amos Shartle Hershey, Ph.D.. Professor of Political Science and Inter- 
national Law. 

(7) 



5 IXniAXA IMVERSITY 

"Bert John Vos. Ph.D., Professor of German. 

William A Rawles, Ph.D., Professor of Political Economy. 

Carl WIlhelm Ferdinand Osttiaus, A.M., Professor of German. 

Schuyler Colfax Davisson, Sc.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

David Andrew Rothroctc, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

William J Moenkhaits, Ph. I >., Professor of Physiology. 

Louis Sherman Davis, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Warner Fite, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy. 

Will David Howe, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Augustus Grote Pohlman, M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

William Wesley Black, A.M., Dean of the School of Education, and Pro- 
fessor of Elementary Education. 

Elmer Ellsworth Jones, Ph.D., Professor of the History and Philosophy 
of Education. 

Charles Jacob Sembower, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Edgar Roscoe Cumjngs, Ph.D., Professor of Geology. 

William Frederick Bock, Ph.D.. Professor of Educational Psychology. 

George Davis Morris, Doct. d'Univ. (Paris), Associate Professor of 
French. 

Frank William Tilden, A.M., Associate Professor of Greek. 

Guido Herman Stempel, A.M., Associate Professor of Comparative Phi- 
lology. 

Chari.es Alfred Mosemiller, A.B., Associate Professor of Romance Lan- 
guages. 

Rolla Roy Ramsey, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics. 

Oliver W Brown, A.M., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Frank Marion Andrews, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Botany. 

Lillian Gay Berry, A.M., Associate Professor of Latin. 

Henry Thew Stephenson. A.B., Associate Professor of English. 

Frank Aydelotte, A.M., B.Litt., Associate Professor of English. 

Wilbur Adelman Cogshall, A.M.. Associate Professor of Astronomy. 

Ulysses Sherman Hanna, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Joshua William Beede, Ph.D.. Associate Professor of Geology. 

Fk.wk Greene Bates, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economics. 

Frank Cubby Mathers, Ph.D.. Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Clarence Eabl May, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Robert Daniel Carmichael, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Melvin Everett Haggerty, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Philosophy. 

Fernandus Payne, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Zoology. 

Eugene Leber, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of German. 

James .M \ w Hook, A.M., Assistant Professor of Botany. 

John Benjamin Dutcher, A.M.. Assistant. Professor of Physics. 

Richard Ashley Rice, A.M., Assistant Professor of English. 

Ernest Henry Biermann, A.M., Assistant Professor of German. 

JOTILDA CONKI.IN, A.M.. Assistant Professor of French. 
W ill. Scott, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

Robert E Burke, Assistant Professor of Fine Arts. 
Iia.i) A Moi.iiy, Ph.D., Assistant, Professor of Physics. 

' \l» int on leave from August 1, L913, to August 1, 1014. 
\\i rii on leave from August 1 , 1912, to August l , 1913. 



General Statement of the Graduate 

School 



Purpose and Administration. The GradSate School furnishes 
opportunities for advanced work leading to careers in higher edu- 
cation and in certain lines of investigation. It does not offer work 
leading to professional degrees in Law or in Medicine. 

The work of the School is a direct continuation of that of the 
College of Liberal Arts; as such it is the most advanced work in 
education undertaken by the State. The Graduate School stands, 
therefore, at the head of the University, and is the culmination of 
the public school system of the State. 

The school is administered by the Council of the Graduate 
School. It is composed of members of the Faculty representing 
different fields of learning. 

Not all departments of the University are at present equally 
equipped for extended graduate work. In recognition of this fact, 
the amount of graduate work offered by the different departments 
varies. Some departments offer work for the A.M. degree only, 
while others offer work leading to the degree of Ph.D. 

Admission. Students holding a bachelor's degree in Arts or in 
Science from Indiana Universit}^, or the same degree or its equiva- 
lent from institutions of equal rank, are admitted to the Graduate 
School on presentation of the proper credentials. Persons holding 
the bachelor's degree from institutions whose requirements are 
considered to lack a year or more of being the equivalent of the 
A.B. degree from this institution, are not admitted to the Graduate 
School. They may enter the College of Liberal Arts, and are 
referred to the Dean of the College for their standing. Holders of 
the A.B. degree or its equivalent from institutions whose require- 
ments lack less than a year of being the equivalent of the A.B. 
degree from this institution, may be admitted to the Graduate 
School. In such cases, work in addition to the minimum of forty- 
five hours for the A.M. degree will be required. The amount will 
be determined in each case by the Council of the Graduate School. 

All graduate students will enroll at the beginning of each term, 
and those entering regularly organized classes will submit to the 
same regulations as undergraduate students. Work w T ill in many 
cases be individual and not controlled by a recitation schedule. At 

(9) 



10 INDIANA CJNIVEBSITY 

the time of entrance to the Graduate School, the student must sub- 
mit a plan of the entire work he wishes to present for the master's 
or doctor's degree. This plan must he approved by the professor 
of the major subject and the Dean of the Graduate School. Grad- 
uate work done before filing such plan will ordinarily not be 
counted toward advanced degrees. 

Fees. Students who are legal residents of the State of In- 
diana are charged a contingent fee of five dollars a term, and a 
library fee of one dollar a term. 

These fees cover in part the cost of the physical maintenance of 
the University, and are not applied to the cost of tuition, which is 
provided wholly by the State. 

Students not legal residents of the State of Indiana, will be 
charged a contingent and library fee amounting to twenty dollars a 
term. For each Summer half-term, half the fee will lie charged. 
This fee is in lieu of the regular library and contingent fees noted 
above. 

The laboratory fees in all courses are uniformly one dollar per 
credit hour. 

The gymnasium fee, if the work in physical training is taken, 
is one dollar a term. 

An examination fee of one dollar is charged for each make-up 
or sp end examination. This fee is paid to the Bursar; his receipt 
when presented to the proper instructor constitutes the authoriza- 
tion far holding the examination. 

The Pee for any degree is five dollars, and must be paid to the 
Bursar at least thirty days before graduation. 

The Library. The library of Indiana University at present- 
contains ninety thousand catalogued volumes. The selection of 
these books has been made with a view to facilitating instruction 
;<u(\ research. The collection is a well-balanced one. but is espe- 
cially strong in Literary and scientific periodicals. The list of peri- 
odicals received and permanently kept on file by the library num- 
bers about four hundred, and includes American, English, German 
French, and, to a less extent, Italian, Spanish, and Swedish publi- 
cations. The library is made thoroughly usable by a carefully pre- 
pared card catalogue, by indexes, and by other bibliographical aids. 
The library force consists of n librarian and twelve assistants, all of 
whom are a1 the service of any authorized user of the library. 

In the library building are seminary rooms for the Departments 
of History, Economics, English, Philosophy, German, Romance 
Languages, Education, Latin and Greek. 



GBADUATE SCHOOL 11 

lii addition to the cent l-h 1 library; where the general literary 
and historical collections arc housed, there are nine departmental 
collections, of varying sizes, kept in the different University build- 
ings. 

All hooks, with the exception of periodicals and books reserved 
for reference, may be drawn for home use. Each graduate student 
may draw five books for two weeks, with privilege of renewal. 

The library is open from Monday to Friday from 7 :45 a.m. to 
10:00 p.m., and on Saturday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 

DEGREES 

Three advanced degrees, Master of Arts, Master of Science, and 
Doctor of Philosophy, are conferred by the University. 

Master of Arts. The degree of Master of Arts may be con- 
ferred upon Bachelors of Arts of this University, or of any other 
institution of equivalent standing, or upon Bachelors of Science 
provided this degree is an alternative equivalent of the A.B. degree, 
following a residence at the University of a minimum of three 
terms and the completion of a minimum of forty-five hours of 
University credit. 

Credits earned in excess of those required for the A.B., or the 
B.S., degrees, before the degree is conferred or a certificate of the 
completion of: the work for the degree is issued, are not counted 
toward the A.M. degree. 

Thirty of the total of forty- five hoars required for the A.M. 
degree must be in one department, or in closely allied departments. 
Fifteen hours must be distinctly graduate in character. There is 
no restriction as to the amount of work that may be carried during 
any term. 

Graduates of this University may be given leave of absence for 
one term of the required year to pursue a specific investigation. 

The work for the A.M. degree may all be done in Summer terms, 
or half-terms, provided that not more than four half-terms be so 
counted and that the work for the degree be completed within five 
years. 

Professional studies are not accepted for the graduate degrees, 
but research work on professional subjects may be accepted for 
these degrees at the option of the professor in charge of the major 
subject. 

A thesis is required in all departments except that of Latin. 

Freshmen courses shall not be counted on advanced degrees, 



\ ss 

- - lit to be received. 
If aster <rf & Mas 

Sciej sity 

. - . a - Irts is 

A.rts 

don of 

sisting - gnised sab- 

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- not 

leg 
listing s nts in which 

5 

s sis. The thesis 

the eandi 

.. ^ . .. 

professor in chars 

sents himself 

ss 
i d ' an il 

s* si require : s deg 

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presented School on 

ndidate 
sis must he indors the 

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sis in the Ubv 
_ will be 

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GB \nr aim', school 13 

graduate fork has been taken, in the presence of such memhers of 
the Faculty of the school as care to attend. 

Ai leasl one year before the final examination the candidate 
shall satisfy the prcfessor in charge of the major subject of his 
ability to use French and German Tor purposes of investigation. 

Application for Degrees. Application for advanced degrees 
must be filed with the Dean ai the time of admission to the Gradu- 
ate School. Application for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy 
must be on file at least one year before the candidate is admitted 
to the examination. 

FELLOWSHIPS 

Teaching Fellowships. A number of teaching fellowships are 
available for graduate students. 

A Teaching Fellow is relieved from all term fees, and the fellow- 
ship carries with it an honorarium of between $200 and $500 an- 
nually. The highest amount will ordinarily be paid only if tin 1 
incumbent is appointed for a third year. A Teaching Fellowship is 
primarily a recognition oi scholarship. A portion of his time will 
be required in the service of the department in which he is ap- 
pointed; but not less than two-thirds of each Fellow's time must 
! e devoted to work leading to the Doctorate in Philosophy. 

Appointments are for one year, and do not necessarily imply a 
reappointment. 

Donaldson Fellowship in Zoology. The Donaldson Fellow- 
ship in Zoology, of the value of $500, is open to students who are 
in large measure cap ible of doing independent work in biological 
subjects. The fellowship implies residence for twelve months at 
the cave farm of the State at Mitchell, Indiana. A certain 
amount of supervising work is required of the incumbent. 

Lawrence Fellowship in Astronomy. The Lawrence Fellow- 
ship of the Department of Mechanics and Astronomy has been 
established by Mr. Percival Lowell, of the Lowell Observatory, 
upon the following terms and conditions: 

1. The fellowship shall be known as the Lawrence Fellowship, in 
remembrance of the donor's mother, and is established in perpetuity, re- 
vocable, however, at any time ;it the will of the founder. 

2. It shall be annually available and shall cover the college calendar 
year, that is. from commencement to commencement of the same. 

3. The applicant shall be appointed by the Department, the dtrnor 
reserving the righl of finally passing upon the suitability of the candidate 
so presented. 



14 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

4. The Fellow shall be given time and opportunity for an original 
thesis on some astronomical subject looking to the taking of a Master's 
degree, the nature of which shall be decided by the Director and the Fel- 
low. But the Fellow shall be expected to give general assistance in the 
work of the observatory during the period of his fellowship. 

5. The Fellowship will pay $600 and the Fellow's traveling expenses 
to and from the Observatory al Flagstaff. Ariz.; and a furnished room at 
the Observatory shall be free to the Fellow's use. 

Fellowships for Graduates of Other Indiana Colleges. The 
Trustees of Indiana University, at their March meeting, 1910, 
established ten Graduate Fellowships of an annual value of $200 
each, with exemption from term fees, to be held by graduates of 
other colleges in the State. In awarding these fellowships the 
policy will he to assign them to the most promising students, irre- 
spective of the special held of study in which they wish to work, or 
the particular institutions from which they come. As between 
cases of equal merit, however, attention will be given to securing a 
distribution of the awards among different departments of study 
and different colleges of the State. 

Applicants for these fellowships should hie a statement of their 
educational history and of their plans with the Dean of the Gradu- 
ate School. They should indicate in this statement the major sub- 
ject which they wish to pursue, and give a transcript of their 
college record. They should also present at this time recommenda- 
tions from their instructors, and such other evidences of their 
fitness as they can offer. Applications will be received up to April 
1 of each year. 

Applications will be referred in each case to the department 
concerned for a decision upon the respective merits of the appli- 
cants in that department. On the basis of the departmental reports, 
the Graduate Conned will recommend to the Trustees the most 
eligible candidates for appointment. 

These fellowships art 1 not open to students doing professional 
work in law or* in medicine. 

Encumbents will not ordinarily he eligible for reappointment, 
Inil they will ho eligible for appointment to teaching fellowships. 

For application blanks, and further information, address the 
I )<an of the Graduate School. 

Research Fellowships. There are, besides the fellowships men- 
tioned above, research fellowships, which are awarded to students 
who have shown marked ability ami who desire to investigate 
definite problems in which they are interested. Each case is de- 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 15 

cided on its merits. The compensation is fixed by the Board of 
Trustees, on the recommendation of the Graduate Council. 

Special Rules Concerning- Fellows. Holders of fellowships are 
not permitted, without the special permission of the Graduate 
Council, to do work For remuneration outside the University. 

UNIVERSITY ORGANIZATIONS! 

The Graduate Club. The Graduate Club was founded in 1910 
to establish closer relations among the graduate students, and be- 
tween graduate students and the members of the Faculty. Through 
closer association and acquaintanceship, the club aims to foster 
solidarity of interest. The meetings are in part social, and in part 
devoted to the presentation of papers by the members of the club, 
giving the results of some investigation carried on by the author. In 
this way students in the different departments are made acquainted 
with the work in various lines of research carried on in the Univer- 
sity. Occasionally addresses are given by visitors of prominence. 
Membership in the club is open to all graduate students. 

Sigma Xi. Sigma Xi is an organization especially for scien- 
tific students. It is a chapter of a national scientific fraternity, to 
which members of the faculty, graduate students, and seniors may 
he elected. Its object is to encourage investigation in science, pure 
and applied. 

Phi Beta Kappa. Phi Beta Kappa is a chapter of the oldest 
Greek-letter fraternity, founded in 1776 for "the promotion of 
scholarship and friendship among students and graduates of Amer- 
ican colleges." It is today no longer a secret society, but an honor 
society, having for its special aim the encouragement of liberal 
culture. At Indiana University, a certain number of seniors, not 
over ten per cent, are ejected each year, partly at Thanksgiving and 
partly at Commencement. The membership includes also certain 
members of the faculty, and a few others chosen directly from the 
ranks of the alumni. The chapter was established on Foundation 
Day, 1911. 

Departmental Clubs. The following departments have special 
departmental clubs : Geology, Zoology, Physics, Chemistry, His- 
tory, Philosophy, English, Mathematics, German, French, Spanish, 
and, Comparative Philology. Membership in these clubs is open to 
faculty members of the department, graduate students, and under- 
ut.'i duates. The purpose of the clubs is to discuss topics of interest 
to members, and to promote social intercourse. 



Departments and Graduate Courses 
of Instruction, 1913-14 



*** In the following Wst are include! many cou.sjs which are open alike to graduates and ad- 
vanced underclassmen. Only a skeleton announcement of these is here made; for full description see 
the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under that heading in the University catalogue. Strictly 
graduate cours3s are described in full. The more elementary courses are not listed here at all. 



DEPARTMENT OF GREEK 

Horace A. Hoffman, Professor. 

Frank W. Tilhen, Associate Professor. 

The time that at the present may be profitably devoted to gradu- 
ate work in Greek is one year, leading- to the degree of A.M. A 
thesis on some subject connected with the seminary work of the 
year is required for the degree. 

All candidates for A.M., with (J reek as major subject are rec- 
ommended to take at least fifteen hours in Latin, in advance of the 
Latin taken in the undergraduate study. 

Courses 9, 12. and 13, or any part of these courses, are also open 
as minors to graduate students who have not already had as part of 
their undergraduate study the work which they take in their 
courses for graduate credit. 

The Department is well equipped for doing satisfactory work 
leading to the degree of Master of Arts. Besides the most impor- 
tant reference books, cyclopedias, dictionaries, lexicons, indexes, 
and standard edition? of Greek writers, an effort has been made to 
build up an especial!;*' good collection of works treating of Euri- 
pides, since seminary work is generally given in that author. The 
Departmenl has the chief older editions as well as nearly all of Hie 
later ones, and many special works bearing on Euripides. 

The Library contains the most important classical journals, 
among them complete sets of 'The American Journal of Philol- 
ogy'; 'The American Journal of Archaeology'; 'The Classical Re- 
view 1 ; Chicago, Cornell, and Harvard 'Studies'; 'Hermes 1 ; 
'Jahrbucher Piir classi&che Philologie'; ' Mitteilungen d. deutsch. 
arch. Inst, in Allien'; ' Philologus ' ; 'Rheinisches Museum'; 'Jour- 
nal of I [ellenic Si udies'. 

Among the mosl valuable works in the field of archaeology and 

(16) 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 17 

art the following may be named: 'Antike Denkmaler'; 'Ausgra- 
bungen von Olympia'; 'Carapanos'; 'Dodona'; Hamdey-Bey and 
Reinach's 'Necropole a Sidon'; Homo-lie's 'Fbuilles de Delph.es'; 
Ohneialsch-Ttiehter's 'Cypros, die Bibel and Homer'; Overbeds 's 
'Griechische Kunstmythologie ' ; Stackelberg's 'Die Graber der 
Hdlenen'; Anger's 'Dorische Polychromie'; Ilawe's 'Gournia'; 
Penrose's 'Principles of Athenian Architecture'; and the publica- 
tions of the American and British Schools of Athens, and of the 
Egyptian Exploration Fund. Among the works on inscriptions 
and epigraphy the following may be mentioned: 'Corpus Inscrip- 
tionum Graecarum'; 'Corpus Inscriptionum Atticarum'; 'Inscr. 
Graec. Septentrionaiis, Italiae, Pelopon.. Insularum, etc.,' 'Die 
[nschriften von Priene', Die Inschriften von Pergamon, and the 
important writings of such authorities as Klein, Kretschmer, Meis- 
terhans, etc. For palaeography and the study of the papyri, the 
following are accessible: Grenfell, Hunt, Kenyon, Mahafty, May- 
ser, Mitteis, Thompson, and Wilkin. In the important field of vase- 
painting, the Library contains many valuable works. Among the 
most noteworthy are: P>enndorf's 'Griechische und Sisilische Vas- 
enbilder'; Collignon and Rayet's 'Historic de la Ceramique gxee- 
que'; Dechelette's l Lcs Vases eeramiques ornes de la Gaule ro- 
maine'; Furtwangler and Ijoeschke's 'Mykenische Vasen,' and 
'Mykenische Thongef asse ' ; Furtwangler and Reichhold's 'Griech- 
ische Vasenmalerei ' ; Harrison and McColl's 'Types of Greek 
Vases,' and various books by Gardner, Huddilston, Klein, Kretsch- 
mer, Murray, Smith, and Walters. 

The Department also owns upwards of 900 photographs of land- 
scapes, buildings, and works of art in Greece, Italy, and. Sicily; 
and has many lantern-slides, busts, casts, a model of the Acropolis 
at Athens, and a series of reproductions of the famous Tanagra 
Figurines. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the De- 
partment. The more elementary courses are not here listed; for 
these see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under that 
heading in the University catalogue: 

9. Lyric and Dramatic Poetry. Associate Professor Tilden. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, at 0:00. 
\'2. Philosophical Prose. Professor Hoffman. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 10:00. 
! 13. Historical and Rhetorical Prose. Associate Professor Tilden. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms. M. W. F., at 10:00.] Not given in 
101311. 



18 INDIANA UNIVEKSITY 

15a. Graduate Seminary. Euripides is the author usually studied, but 
others authors may be selected. In 1012-13 Plato's Republic was 
the work studied. Professor Hoffman. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, Th., at hours to he appointed. 
15&. Graduate Seminary : In 1912-13 Ideal Forms of Government were 
studied from Plato to modern times. Associate Professor Tilden. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, F., at hours to be appointed. 

DEPARTMENT OF LATIN 

Lillian Gay Perry, Associate Professor. 

The work of the Department leading- to invest i gat ion lies in the 
fields of Latin Literature, Roman Institutions, Epigraphy, Textual 
Criticism, Latin Syntax, and the Topography and Monuments of 
Ancient Home. In addition to the promotion of pure scholarship, 
the work is intended to meet the needs of those making the teaching 
of Latin in high schools and colleges their profession, whether or 
not they are candidates for a degree, not by instruction in peda- 
gogical methods, but by a deepening of their knowledge of and a 
quickening of their interest in Latin. 

Students entering upon the graduate study of Latin must pre- 
viously have completed the courses required of a Major in the 
Department, or their equivalent. Courses 28 and 32 will be re- 
quired of all students who are graduates' of' institutions which do 
not offer similar courses as a part of the undergraduate prepara- 
tion. If Courses 33 or 35, or both, have been taken in the under 
graduate Course, Course 34 should be made a part of the graduate 
work', and vice versa. 

A continuous year of residence is advisable for profitable grad- 
ual e work-, hut in special cases approved by the Department, the 
work for the A.M. degree may be done; in three summers, 

Following are courses open to graduate students in the Depart- 
ment: The more elementary courses are not here listed; for these 
sec the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under that head- 
ing iu Hie University catalogue 

28. Paleography and Criticism. An introduction to the use of critical 
editions of Latin authors. In L912-13 a special study has been 
made of the first hook of Caesar's 'Gallic War'. This course is 
recommended to persons expecting to teach Latin, and will be re- 
qnired niter this date of students admitted to the third year with 
advanced standing from other colleges. Mr. Menk. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T., ;it L0:00. 
Johnston, 'Latin Manuscripts'; Meusel, 'Caesar'; Meusel (or Menge 

PreuSS) 'Lexicon'. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 19 

;;l\ Epigraphy. Recitations, occasional lectures, and the reading of some 
Qve hundred Latin inscriptions. Associate Professor Berry. 
Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, T.. at 0:00. 
Egbert, 'Latin Inscriptions'. 

[33. The Prose Writers of the Republic. Selections from Cato, Sallust, 
Cicero, and Ilirtins. with the critical study of the text of one of 
these authors so far as it is read in the class. 

Courses 33 and 34 art given in alternate years.] 

Omitted in 1012-13. 

34. The Poets of the Republic. Selections from Plautus, Terence. Lucre 

tins, and Catullus, with the critical study of the text of some one 
of these authors so far as read in the class. Students are expected 
to be able to read German. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 0:00. 

35. Latin of the Empire. Selections from Tacitus, Suetonius, Juvenal. 

and Martial will be studied with reference to their portrayal of 
political and social conditions under the Early Empire. Associate 
Professor Berry. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, at 11:00. 

41. Topography and Monuments of Ancient Rome. Recitations, lectures, 

and assigned readings. Associate Professor Berry. 

Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, once a week, at an hour to be ar- 
ranged. 

Platner, 'Ancient Rome'. 

Open to graduate students only. 

42. Readings in Latin Literature. The work in this course varies from 

year to year. It includes wide reading in authors of all periods, 
together with the first hand investigation of some problem con- 
nected with the line of reading being followed. In 1012-13 a study 
has been made of the Latin Romance, its origin and history; 
and characteristics as shown in Petronius and Apuleius. Asso- 
ciate Professor Berry. 

Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, T., 2:00 to 3:50. 

Open to graduate students only. 

43. Advanced Composition. This course is intended especially for teach- 

ers, hut may be taken by any persons who need practice in writing 

Latin. Mr. Menk. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, once a week, at an hour to be 

arranged. 
Open to graduates and teachers of Latin. 

50. Seminary. The critical study of the text of some standard author, 
with incidental investigation of problems in syntax, style, prosody, 
and so forth. In past years, Caesar, Sallust, Tacitus, and Plautus 
have been made the subjects of similar work. In 1011-12 a study 
of Terence was made. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M„ 2:00 to 3:50. 

Open to graduate students only. 



20 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES 

Albert F. Kuersteiner, Professor of Romance Languages. 

George D. Morris, Associate Professor of French. 

Charles A. Mosemiller, Associate Professor of Romance Languages. 

The Department of Romance Languages offers one year of 
graduate work, leading to the degree of ALA. 

The Library is well equipped with works in French criticism 
and with texts, of the eighteenth century, and has a fair selection 
of other works of modern French literature. It contains, also, all 
of the volumes so far published by the 'Socicte des anciens textes 
francais', and a good collection of French grammars and diction- 
aries. The following periodical publications are on file: 

Arehiv fur das Studium der neueren Sprachen und Literaturen. 

Bibliothek des litterarischon Vereins in Stuttgart. 

Euphorion 

Franzosische Studien. 

Germaniseh-Romanisehe Monatsschrift; 

Literaturblatt fur germanische und romanische Philologie. 

Modern Language Notes. 

Modern Language Review. 

Modern Philology. 

Publications of the Modern Language Association of America. 

Revue Bleue. 

Revue de Cours et Conferences. 

Revue des deux Mondes. 

Revue des Langues Romanes. 

Revue de Paris. 

Revue de Philologie franchise et de Litterature. 

Romania. 

Zeitsehrift fiir franzosische Sprache und Litteratur. 

Zeitsehrift fiir romanische Philologie. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the 
Department. The more elementary courses are not here listed; for 
these see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under that 
heading in the University catalogue: 

17. Seventeenth Century Poetry and Drama. Professor Kuersteiner. 

Fall. Wilder, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 9:00.] 

Omitted in 1913 1 I. 
24. Eighteenth Century Poetry and Drama. Professor Kuersteiner, 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 9:00. 
10. Nineteenth Century: The Romantic Period. Associate Professor 
Mobbis. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., al 10:00. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 21 

[27. Nineteenth Century. The Realistic Period. Associate Professor 

MOBBIS. 

Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 10:00.] 
Omitted in 1013-14. 
32. Contemporary Fiction. Associate Professor Mourns. 

Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 10:00. 
[33. Contemporary Drama. Associate Professor Morris. 
Fall. Winter, and Spring terms. T. Th., at 10:00.] 
Omitted in 1913-14. 
'2(1 Advanced Composition. Associate Professor Mosemieler. 

Fall. Wilder, and Spring terms. T. Th., at 2:00. 
13. ()i(t French. Reading of texts; study of Old French phonology and 
morphology ; exercises in tracing words from classical and from 
popular Latin to Modern French. Lectures. Associate Professor 
Mosemiler. 
Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 11:00. 
Paris, 'Extraits de la Chanson de Roland' ; Suchier, 'Aucassin et 
Nicolete' (French edition) ; Constans, 'Chrestomathie de l'ancieri 
frai:<;ais" ; Paris-Langlois, 'Chrestomathie du moyen-age' ; Paris- 
L-anglois, 'Extraits des ehroniqUeurs frangais'. 
Open to students who have studied French and Latin. 



DEPARTMENT OF GERMAN 

Bert J. Yos, Professor. 

Carl W. F. Osthaus, Professor. 

Eugene Leser, Assistant Professor. 

In combination with the Department of Comparative Philology, 
which gives courses in Gothic, Old High German, and Old Norse, 
the Department at present offers about thirty-five hours of graduate 
work. Students entering upon the graduate study of German must 
previously have completed the courses required for a major in the 
Department, or their equivalent. Courses 27 and 29 are, however, 
open to students of other departments than German upon the com- 
pletion of the work of the Junior year. The library is well equipped 
with books for the special study of Classical and Nineteenth Cen- 
tury German literature. 

The list of complete sets of periodicals and of current publica- 
tions received includes the following, those marked with an asterisk 
representing complete sets: 

Aleniannia. 

Allgemeine Zeitung. Miinchen. 
*Arehiv fur das Studium der neueren Sprachen und Literaturen. 
: Archiv fur Litteraturgeschichte. 



22 INDIANA UNIVEKSITY 

*Arkiv for nordisk Filologi. 

*Beitrage zur Gesehiehte der deutschen Sprache und Literatur. 
*Bit>liothek des litterarisehen Sereins in Stuttgart. 
^Columbia University Germanic Studies. 

Das Litterarische Echo. 
*Euphorion. 

♦Forschungen zur neueren Literaturgeschichte, herausgegebeii von F. 
Muneker. 

< lerman-American Annals. 
*Germanisch-Ronianische Monatsschrift, 
*Goethe Jahrbuch. 

* I ndogermanische Forschungen. 
Jahrbuch des freien deutschen Hoclistifts. 

* Jahrbuch der Grillparzer Gesellschaft. 

Jahrbuch des Vereins fiir niederdeutsclie Sprachforschung. 
*Jahresbericht tiber die Erscheinungen auf dem Gebiete der Genua niseheu 

Pliilologie. 
*Jahresberichte fiir neuere deutsche Litteraturgeschichte. 
*Joumal of English and Germanic Philology. 

Korrespondenzblatt des Yereius fiir niederdeutsclie Sprachforschung. 
*Literaturblatt fiir germanische und romanische Pliilologie. 
*Modern Language Notes. 
-Modern Language Review. 

* Modern Philology. 

: Moiiatshefte fiir deutsche Sprache und Padagogik. 

♦Publications of the Modern Language Association of America. 

::: <hie]len und Forschungen. 

*Revue genua nique. 

*Veroffentlichungen des Schwabiscben Schiller Vereins. 

: Vierteljahrschrift fiir Litteraturgeschichte. 

Zeitschrift des Allgemeinen deutschen Sprach vereins. 
♦Zeitschrift des Vereins fiir Volkskunde. 

Zeitschrift fiir Biicherfreunde. 
♦Zeitschrift fiir deutsches Altertum. 

Zeitschrift fiir deutsche Mundarten. 
♦Zeitschrift fiir deutsche Pliilologie. 

Zeitschrift fiir den deutschen rnterricht. 
♦Zeitschrifl fiir deutsche Wortforschung. 

Zeitschrift fiir die osterreichischen Gymnasien. 
♦Zeitschrift fiir vergleichende Litteraturgeschichte. 

For Gothic and Old High German, sec Courses 4 and !) of the 
Departmenl of Comparative Phililogy. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the 
Department. The more elementary courses are not here listed; Eor 
these see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under that 
heading in the University catalogue: 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 23 

14. German Usage. Assistant Professor Leber. 

Winter and Spring terms, T. Tli., at an hour to be appointed. 
30. studies in the rccenl German Drama. Professor Ostiiaus. 

Fall term, M. W. F., at an hour to be appointed. 
Lis. Journal Club. This course is introductory to the work of the Ger- 
man Seminar?. Members make reports upon the contents of cur- 
rent numbers of journals devoted to German literature and phi- 
lology, and are trained in tiie use of important works of refer- 
ence. Two to live hours' credit. Professor Vos. 
Fall term, two hours weekly, at an hour to be appointed. 
I'L*. German Seminary: Goethe as a Lyric Poet. Conducted mainly in 
German. Two to five hours' credit. Professor Vos. 
Winter and Spring terms, to hours weekly, at an hour to he ap- 
pointed. 
Open to students who have completed Course 28. 
l'T. Middle High German. Outline of the phonology, accidence and syn- 
tax. Reading of selections from the lyric poets, the popular and 
court epic. Conducted in German. Professor Vos. 
Fall and Winter terms, two hours weekly, at an hour to be ap- 
pointed. 
I'D. History of the German Language. The relation of German to other 
Germanic languages; the dialect divisions of Modern German; 
origins of the literary language; changes since the middle period; 
history of German orthography. Conducted in German. Professor 
Vos. 
Spring term, two hours weekly, at an hour to be appointed. 
Behaghel, 'Die deutsche Sprache' ('Das Wissen der Gegenwart', 
Band 54). 

DEPARTMENT OF COMPARATIVE PHILOLOGY 

Gutdo U. Stempel, Associate Professor. 
Course 8 will be given by Mr. Edgar A. Menk of the Department of Latin. 

The graduate courses offered below will be extended as required. 
They may be supplemented by certain of the courses listed as un- 
dergraduate, as well as by certain courses given in the other lan- 
guage Departments and in History. Social Science (Anthropology), 
Philosophy, and English. The time that can profitably be spent 
here in graduate study in Philology is at present about two years. 

The collection of American, British, and German periodicals 
devoted to Indo-European philology is practically complete. 

The more elementary courses of the Department are not here 
listed ; for these see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or 
under that heading in the University catalogue. 



24 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

5. Comparative Philology of the Classical Languages. An advanced 
course in the science of language and Endo*-European philology. 
Each student will emphasize the particular language in which he 
has had special training. Associate Professor Stempel. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 10:00. 

Giles, 'Manual of Comparative Philology for Classical Students'. 

Open to students who have passed in Courses _! and :>. and in thirty 
hours of language, and to advanced students in Latin or Greek. 
[4. Gothic. Grammar and reading; phonology of the early Germanic 
languages. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms. T. Th., at 10:00. 

Wright, 'Primer of the Gothic Language'. 

Open to students who have passed in Course 2 and in thirty hours 
of language, and to others at the option of the instructor. 

Given every third year: see Courses and 10. 

Not given in 1913-1 4. Given every third year, follow ('nurse 10; see 
Courses 9 and 10. 
S. Sanskrit. Grammar and reading; comparative phonology of the lan- 
guages, yir. Menk. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 10:00. 

Perry. 'Sanskrit Primer' (or Lanman, 'Sanskrit Reader) ; and Whit- 
ney, 'Sanskrit Grammar'. 

Open to advanced students in Latin or Greek at the option of the 
instructor. 
9. Old High German. Elements of the grammar, reading of selected 
texts, study of dialectal divergence. The method will he both 
comparative and historical. Associate Professor Stempkl. 

Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 10:00. 

Wright, 'Old High German Primer"; Braune, 'Althochdeutsche Gram- 
matik' ; Braune, 'Althoehdeutsch.es Lesebuch'. 

Open to students on same conditions as Course 4. 

Given every third year, following Course 4; see Courses 4 and 10. 
Mo. Middle High German. (1) Fall term: Elements of the grammar, 
reading of easy texts, and study of the development of the Ger- 
man language. (-) Winter and Spring terms: Nibelungenlied. 
with special study of the popular epic. 

fall. Winter, and Spring terms. T. Th., at L0:0O. 

Wright, -.Middle High German Primer'; Paul, 'Mittelhochdeutsche 
Grammatik'; Robertson, 'Dei- arme Heinrich' ; Zarncke, 'Das Ni- 
belungenlied'. 

Open to students on same conditions as ("nurse I. | 

Omitted in 1912-13. Given every third .scar, following Course 9; see 
Courses I and !). 
[11. Old Norse, introduction to the language, and the reading of texts 
thai throw ij-ht upon the popular literature of England and Ger 
many. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. P., al 10:00. 

Sweet, 'Icelandic Primer'; selected texts. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 25 

Open to students who have passed in fifteen hours of Germanic phi- 
lology and to others at the option of the instructor.] 

Omitted in 1912-13. 
15. Seminary. Some topic in grammatical theory or the development of 
some English usage will be made the basis of study. Associate 
Professor Stempel. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, W., 2:00 to .'i :50. 

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

Will 1). Howe, Professor. 

Charles J. Semboweb, Professor. 

Henry T. Stephenson, Associate Professor. 

Frank Aydelotte, Associate Professor. 
Richard A. Rice, Assistant Professor. 

The Department is prepared to offer research work leading- to 
the A.M. and Ph.D. degres, in the following periods: Elizabethan 
literature, the literature of the Seventeenth Century, of the 
Eighteenth Century, and of the first half of the Nineteenth Century. 

The University library contains the chief Society publications; 
for example. The Early English Text Society, Chaucer Society, 
Spenser Society, Shakspere (Old and New), Shakespeare Jahrbuch, 
Hutb Library, Malone. Substantial additions are being made each 
year. Besides these publications, all the principal reviews and 
journals are received. 

For the degree of A.M., the candidate should have had in his 
undergraduate work the equivalent of forty-five hours of English, 
and should, in his graduate work, pursue a course restricted to 
three subjects, approved by the Department of English. 

For the degree of Ph.D., the candidate will be expected to do at 
least two full years' work in residence after the degree of A.M. He 
must be able to read German and French, and to do a piece of inde- 
pendent research which will be acceptable to the Department, 

The following courses are open to graduate students in the 
Department. The most elementary courses are not here listed; for 
these see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under that 
heading in the University catalogue. 

!>. Elizabethan Drama (1557-1625). Associate Professor Stephenson. 

Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, three hours a week, 
lo. Shakspere. Associate Professor Stephenson. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, two hours a week. 
33. Literary Criticism. Professor Howe. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, two hours a week. 



26 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

85. Seminary in Composition. Professor Sembower and Associate Pro- 
fessor Stephenson. 
Hours and credit to be arranged. 

42. Chaucer. Associate Professor Aydelotte. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, two hours a week. 

44. The Age of Milton and the Age of Dryden (1625-1700). Professor 

Sembower. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, three hours a week. 

45. The Eighteenth Century (17(10-1770). Assistant Professor Kick. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, two hours a week. 

56. Contemporary Drama. Mr. Jenkins. 

Fall and Winter terms, two hours a week. 

Not more than one-third of the work in English of a candidate 
for the degree of A.M. in this Department may consist of the 
courses listed above. 

17. Metrics. A study of modern English meter. Assistant Professor 
Rice. 

[50. Research Course in Anglo-Saxon Literature. An investigation of 
sources and authorities; reading of Anglo-Saxon literature. Pre- 
requisite, Comparative Philology 2. Five hours of credit may he 
secured in this course each term. J 
Omitted in 1913-14. 

[51. Research Course in Middle English Literature. Reading of much 
prose, many romances, and some of the most important poems; 
study of sources and relationship. It is expected that students 
who take this course will he able to read Middle English, Ger- 
man, and French. Five hours of credit may be secured in this 
course each term.] 
Omitted in 1913-14. 

;')L\ Elizabethan Literature. Studies in the various forms of literature of 
the Elizabethan Age; investigation of sources and relationships. 
The work may deal either with individual authors or special liter- 
ary forms. A reading knowledge of German and French is re- 
quired. Five hours of credit may he secured in this course each 
term. Associate Professor Aydelotte. 

.",::. Seventeenth Century Literature. A research course in the literature 
from L625-170O. Reading knowledge of German and French is 
required. Five hours of credit may be secured in this course, each 
term. Professor Sembower. 

54. Eighteenth Century Literature. Studies in one of the fields of litera- 
ture the poetry, the drama, the essay, or the novel. Reading 
knowledge oi German and French is required. Five hours of 
credit may he secured in Ihis course each term. Professor HOWE 
and Assistant Professor Kice. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 27 

Research studies in the Literature of the Nineteenth Century. Dis- 
cussion of the various literary forms and study of the relation- 
ship between English and contemporary European literature. 
Reading knowledge of German and French is required. Five 
hours of credit may be secured in tins course each term. Profes- 
sors Howe and Sembower. 



DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

James A. Woodburn, Professor of American History and Politics. 
Samuel P. Harding, Professor of European History. 
Amos S. Hershey, Professor of Political Science. 

The Department is prepared to offer research work leading to 
A.M. and I'll.]), degrees in the following fields: American Colonial 
History, the American Civil War and Reconstruction and the his- 
tory of American political parties, English History in the Seven- 
teenth ami Nineteenth Centuries, the French Revolution, Diplo- 
matic History, Political Philosophy, International Law, and the 
History of Indiana during the Middle Period, 1820-1860. In each 
of these fields good library collections are already at hand, to which 
constant additions are being made. 

The following are among the periodicals and continuation sets 
at the disposal of advanced students of history and political science : 

American Historical Association, Annual Reports, 1884- 

Anierican Historical Review, 1890- 

Anierican Journal of International Law, 1907- 

Ainerican Magazine of Civics, 1 804-0. 

American Political Science Review. 1005- 

Annales des Sciences Politique*, 1890- 

Annals of the American Academy of Political Science, 1890- 

Annuaire Historique, 1810-50. 

Annual Register, 1791-1828. 

Archives Diplomatique*, 1005- 

Camdep Miscellany, 1847- 

Camden Society Publications, 183S- 

Columbia University Studies in History, Economics, and Public Law, 1891- 

Cyclopedic Review of Current History, 1893-1902. 

DeBow's Review, L846-68. 

English Historical Review, 18S9- 

Historical Manuscripts Commission Reports (Great Britain), 1S70- 

Gulf States Historical Magazine. 1902-04. 

Hansard's Parliamentary Debates, 1812-1897. 

Harvard Historical Studies, 1890- 

Historische Zeitschrift, 1888- 

fowa Journal of History and Politics, 1903- 



28 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

Johns Hopkins University Studies in History and Political Science. 1883- 

Magazine of American History, 1880-93. 

Nile's Weekly Register, 1811-49. 

Political Science Quarterly, 1886- 

La Revolution Frangaise, 1899- 

Revue cle Droit International et de Legislation Comparee, 1896- 

Revue Generate de Droit International et de Legislation Coinparee, 1896- 

Revue Historique. 1895- 

Revue Politique et Litteraire : Revue Bleue, 1880- 

Royal Historical Society Transactions. 3d series, 1907- 

South Atlantic Quarterly. 1903- 

^ondon Times (weekly ed. ) , 1896-7; 1901- 

University of Missouri Studies, 1901- 

University of Pennsylvania Publications: Series in Political Economy and 
Public Law, 1889- 

University of Wisconsin Bulletin: Economics, Political Science, and His- 
tory series, ls ( .i-t-<>5). 

Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, 1894- 

William and Mary College Quarterly Historical Magazine, 1902- 

Zeitschrlft ftir Volkerrecht und Bundesstaatsrecht, 1906- 

Candidates for the degree Ph.D., with History as major subje.-t, 
will be examined on each of the following fields: (1) Ancient His- 
tory, with emphasis at the option of the candidate in either Greek 
or Raman History; (2) Mediaeval and Modern History, with em- 
phasis in either the mediaeval or the modern field ; (3) English His- 
tory, with emphasis either on the period before 1485, or after that 
date; and (4) American History, with chief emphasis either on the 
period before 1783, or after that date. The examination on the 
special field of the tliosis will naturally be more searching than 
elsewhere. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in this 
Department. The more elementary courses are not here listed: for 
these mm> the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under that 
heading in the University catalogue. 

<;. English History. Professor Harding. 

Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. P., at L0:00. 
'.i. Renaissance and Reformation. Professor Harding. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at LI :00. 
11. American Diplomatic History. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., al 8:00. 
i\\n. Governmenl and Parties of England. Professor Hershey. 

Fall term, M. W. F., al 1 1 :00. 
-■"<). Governmenl and Parties of Continental Europe. Professor Hershey. 
Winter term. \i. \\ . F.. al 1 1 :00. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 29 

24. History of Political Ideas and Theory of the State. Professor Her- 

SI1KV. 

Spring torn). M. W. F.. at 11 :00. 

! 13. France in the Middle Ages. A study of the institutions of mediaeval 
France, and of the processes whereby the feudal type of society 
was transformed into the modern state. Lectures, collateral read- 
ing, and reports on assigned topics. Professor Harding. 

Fall and Winter terms. T. Th., at 11:00.] 

Omitted in 1912-13. 

Ki. Historical Method. The principles of historical investigation, with 
some practice in the use nf sources and the preparation of papers. 
Professor Harding. 
Fall term, T. Th.. at an hour to he appointed. 

28. American Political Parties. A study of some of the more notable 

leaders and party programs in the political and constitutional 
controversies in the national period of American history. De- 
signed to introduce the student to a first-hand knowledge of the 
materials relating to the leading issues in our national party de- 
velopment. Professor Woodburn. 
Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 9:00. 

29. History of Indiana in the Middle Period of the Nineteenth Century, 

18164860. A study of the development of the State, its settle- 
ment, population, laws, internal improvements, canals, banking 
system, schools, and social life. Mr. Esarey. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 11:00. 

20a. Seminary in English History. Individual research work, under the 
guidance of the instructor, on some subject connected with mod- 
ern English history. The results of the investigations sire pre- 
sented from time to time as reports and are finally embodied in 
papers in form suitable for publication, of which a copy must 
be left with the Seminary. Professor Harding. 
Fall. Winter, and Spring terms. Hours for individual conference to 
be arranged. 

20c. Seminary in American Constitutional and Political History. In 
1911-12 the topics of study related to Indiana in connection with 
national political history in the decade before the Civil War. 
Study of sources, reports of investigations, and thesis work. 
Professors Woodburn and Harding, and Mr. Esarey. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M., at 4:00 to 5:30. 

Open to advanced students and graduates. 

20rt. Seminary in International Law and Diplomacy. Research work and 
the special study of important topics, more especially of present 
day problems. During recent years such subjects were selected 
as the Alabama Claims, the Panama Affair, the causes of the 
Russo-Japanese War, the 'Open Door' policy in China, and the 
genesis of the Monroe Doctrine. 
Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, at hours to he appointed. 

4—32788 



30 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS AND SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Ulysses (t. Weatheri.y, Professor of Economics and Social Science. 
William A. Rawles, Professor of Political Economy. 
Frank G. Bates, Associate Professor of Economics and Social Science. 
John A. Lapp, Lecturer on Social Legislation. 

While the graduate work of the Department is primarily in- 
tended to cover one year and to lead to the Master's degree, it may 
in certain cases be extended to cover the requirements for the 
Doctor's degree. In the following special fields the courses of in- 
struction are ample and the research materials adequate: Eco- 
nomic History, Economic Theory, Money and Finance, Statistics 
and Statistical Method, Historical and Descriptive Sociology, So- 
ciological Theory, Social Technology, and Municipal Problems. 

The Department library is equipped with full sets of the most 
important public documents, both state and national, and has com- 
plete sets of most of the American, English, French, and German 
economic periodicals. Advanced students have direct access to 
these materials, and also to the special collections relating to char- 
itable and correctional institutions. The Department is affiliated 
with the Charity Organization Society of Indianapolis, with the 
Social Service Department of the School of Medicine, and with the 
Legislative Reference Department of the State Library. Through 
these agencies properly qualified students are enabled to come into 
direct contact with the social and economic problems of Indianapo- 
lis. Constant use is also made of the statistical materials in the 
various departments of the State government. 

The more elementary courses of the Department are not here 
listed ; foe these see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or 
under that heading in the University catalogue. 

<;. Money, Banking, and the Money Market. Associate Professor 
B \n:s. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 8:00. 
."». Public Finance. Associate Professor BATES. 

Full. Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. P., at 8:00. 
'.). Transportation. Professor Rawles. 

Spring term. M. W. P.. ;it 0:00. 
5. Advanced Political Economy. .Mi-. Foreman. 



Pall, 


Winter 


. :iikI 


Sp 


ring t 


enns, M. 


\\\ F., 


at 11 :00. 


.Muni 


cipal l'. 


►oblei 


ns. 


As* 


iciate Pr< 


• lessor 


Bates. 


Pall, 


Winter, 


, and 


S, 


ring 


terms, T. 


Th., at 


11:00. 


Econ 


omic :n 


id S< 


»ci;i 


I Leg 


Islation. 


Associ; 


ite Professor 


.Mi 


•. Lapp. 














Pall, 


Winter, 


, and 


Sp 


ring I 


enns, M. 


W. P., 


at 1 1 :00. 



31. Economic ;in<l Social Legislation. Associate Professor Bates ami 



GKADUATE SCHOOL 31 

20a. Descriptive Sociology. Social Origins. Professor Weathebly. 

Fall term, T. Th., at L0:00. 
20b. Descriptive Sociology: Domestic Institutions. Professor Weath- 
ebly. 
Winter term, Th.. at 10:00. 
20c. Descriptive Sociology: Demography. Professor Weathebly. 

Spring term, T. Tli.. at L0:00. 
4a. Social Pathology: Poverty and Charities. Professor Weathebly. 

Fall term. M. W. P., at 10:00. 
4//. Social Pathology: Crime and Penology. Professor Weathebly. 

Winter term, M. W. F., at 10:00. 
4c. Social Pathology: Special Problems. Professor Weathebly. 

Spring term, M. W. F.. at 10:00. 
10. Socialism and Social Reform. Professor Weathebly. 

Fall term, T. Th., at 11:00. 
la. General Sociology: Social Forces. Professor Weathebly. 

Winter term, T. Th., at 11:00. 
lb. General Sociology: Social Efficiency, rrofessor Weathebly. 
Spring term, T. Th., at 11:00. 
S. Seminary in Economics and Sociology. Professors Weathekly and 
Rawles. Associate Professor Bates, Mr. Foreman and Mr. Lapp. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, W., 3:00 to 4:50. 
8a. Research. Professors Weatherly and Rawles, Associate Professor 
Bates, Mr. Foreman and Mr. Lapp. 
Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, at hours to he appointed. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY 

Ernest H. Lindley. Professor of Philosophy and Psychology. 
Warner Fite, Professor of Philosophy. 
William L. Bryan, Lecturer on Ethics. 

Melvtn E. Haggerty, Associate Professor and Director of the Psycho- 
logical Laboratory. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the 
Department. The more elementary courses are not here listed ; for 
these see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under that 
heading in the University catalogue. 

34. Psychological Seminary. Professor Lindley and Assistant Professor 

Haggerty. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, two hours a week. 

35. Modern Idealism. Professor Fite. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 10:00. 
[36. Advanced Logic and Methods of Science. Professor Fite. 

Fall and Winter terms, two hours once a week at a period to he 

arranged.] 
Omitted in 1912-13. 



32 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

~>. Advanced Psychology. Professor Lindley or Professor Fite. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, at hours to be arranged. 
7. Comparative Psychology. Assistant Professor Haggerty. 

Fall and Winter terms, M. W. F., at 11 :00. 
S. Psychological Research. Work arranged with individual students. 
Professor Lindi.ey and Assistant Professor Haggerty. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, at hours to be arranged. 
HO. Seminary in Applied Psychology. A survey of psychological prin- 
ciples In relation chiefly to business enterprise and industrial proc- 
esses, and incidentally to various trades and professions. Pre 
fessor Lixdlky and Assistant Professor Haggerty. 
Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, two hours a week. 

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

Schuyler G. Davisson, Professor. 
David A. Rothrock, Professor- 
Ulysses S. Hanna. Associate Professor. 
Robert D. Carmioiiael, Associate Professor. 

The graduate courses at present offered by the Department lead 
to the A.M. and Ph.D. degrees. 

The library of the Department, consisting' of about 2,300 bound 
volumes, is located in Room 36, Wylie Hall. The library is open 
Prom 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m., for use by students pursuing ad- 
vancer] work in mathematics. The collection of mathematical books 
consists of the more important English, French, and German texts 
and treatises, the collected works of Abel, Bernoulli, Cauehy, Cay- 
lev. Clifford, DeMorg-an, Gauss, Jacobi, Lagrange, Lie, Mobius, Rie- 
mann, Schwartz. Smith, Steiner, and Weierstrass. together with the 
following sets of periodicals: 

Acta Mathematica. Stockholm. Berlin, Paris. 1882 to date. 

Akademie der Wissenschaften, Sitzungsberichte, Math. — Naturwiss. Klasse. 

Vienna. Curreni numbers. 
Akademie der Wissenschaften, Math.— Phys. Klasse. Berlin, Current 

numbers. 
Akademie van Wetenschappen. Verhandelingen. Amsterdam. Current 

numbers. 
American Journal of Mathematics, Baltimore. 1878 to date. 
American Mathematical Monthly. Springfield, Mo. 1884 to date. 
Analysf (The). \><< Moines, [n. L874-1883. Complete. 
Annali <li Matematica. Milan. Current numbers. 
Annals of Mathematics. Charlottesville, Va., and Cambridge, Muss. 1884 

0; date. 
Annales Heienl ifiques de I'Ecole Normale Superieure. Paris. 18(14 to date. 
Arcliiv der Mnthemntik mid I'iiysik. Leipzig. 1841 t«. date. 



<;k LDTJATE SCHOOL 'SH 

Aivliiv I .'►!• Mathematik og X.mI nrvidenskab. Christiania. Current num- 
bers. 

Arkiv for Matematik, Astronomi och Fysik. Stockholm. Current number. 

Atti della Reale Aeeademia dei Lineei. Koine. Current numbers. 

Bibliothecn Mathematica. Leipzig. Current numbers. 

r.ulletiu de la Soeiete mat heinatique de France. Paris. 1S72 to date. 

Bulletin de la Soeiete physico-mathe'matique de Kasan. Kasan. Current 
numbers. 

Bulletin des Sciences matliematiques. Paris, 1870 to date. 

Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society. New York. lsj)4 to date. 

Bulletin of the New York Mathematical Society. New York. 1891-1894. 
Complete. 

Cambridge .Mathematical Journal. Cambridge. 1837-1845. Complete. 

Cambridge and Dublin Mathematical Journal. Cambridge. 1846-1854. 
Complete. 

Educational Times (Mathematical Reprints from the). London. 1S(1,'} to 
date. 

Giornale di Matematiche di Battaglini. Naples. Current numbers. 

I] Bnlletino di Matematico. Bologna. Current numbers. 

Jahrhuch iiber die Fortschritte der Mathematik. Berlin. 1868 to date. 

Jahresbericht der deutschen Mathematiker-Vereinigung. Leipzig. 1892 to 
date. 

Journal de l'Eeole Polytechnique. Paris. 179. r > to date. 

Journal de Matliematiques pures et appliquees (Liouville). Paris, 1836 
to date. 

Journal fiir die reine und angewandte Mathematik (Ctelle). Berlin. 1826 
to date. 

L'Education Mathematique. Paris, Current numbers. 

L'Enseignement Mathematique. Geneve. Current numbers. 

L'lntei media ire des Mathematiciens. Paris. Current numbers. 

Mathematical Monthly (The). Cambridge, Mass. 1859-1861. Complete 

Mathematical Magazine. Washington. 18S2-18S4. 

Mathematical Gazette. London. 1896 to date. 

Mathematical Messenger (The). Ada, Louisiana. 1887-1894. 

Mathematical Review. Worcester. 1S9C-1897. Complete. 

Mathematical Visitor. Erie, Pa. 1877-1883. Complete. 

Mathematische Annalen. Leipzig. 1869 to date. 

Mathematische und naturwissenschaftliche Berichte aus Ungarn. Leipzig, 
Current numbers. 

Mathesis. Ghent. 1881 to date 

Messenger of Mathematics (The Oxford, Cambridge and Dublin). Cam- 
bridge. 1862-1871. Complete. 

Messenger of Mathematics (The). London and Cambridge. 1872 to date 

Mitteilungeu der Mathematischen Gesellschaft in Hamburg. Leipzig. Cur- 
rent numbers. 

Monatshefte ftir Mathematik und Physic. Vienna. Current numbers. 

Municipal Journal of Engineering. New York. 1905 to date. 

Nachriehten von der Koniglichen Gesellschaft der Wissenschaften zu Got- 
tingen : Mathematisch-physikalische Klasse. Berlin. 1873 to date. 

Nouvelles Annates de Mathematiques. Paris. Current numbers. 



34 INDIANA UNIVEESITY 

Nyt Tidsskrift for Matematik. Copenhagen. Current numbers. 
Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society. Edinburgh. 1883 to 

date. 
Proceedings of the Indiana Academy of Science. Indianapolis. 1891 to 

date. 
Proceedings of the London Mathematical Society. London. 1865 to date. 
Proceedings of the Mathematical-physical Society of Tokyo. Tokyo. Cur- 
rent numbers. 
Quarterly Journal of Mathematics, Pure and Applied. London. 1857 to 

date. 
Rendiconti del Circolo Matematico di Palermo. 1884 to date. 
Revista de la Sociedad Matematica Espahola. Madrid. 1911 to date. 
Revue de Mathematiques Speciales. Paris. Current numbers. 
Revue Semestrielle des Publications mathematiques. Amsterdam. 1893 

to date. 
Saohsische Gesellschaft der Wissenschaften. P>erichte. Mathematisch- 

Physikaliscbe Klasse. Leipzig. Current numbers. 
Science. New York and Lancaster. 1908 to date. 

Sitzungesberichte der Berliner mathematischen Gesellschaft. P>erlin. Cur- 
rent numbers. 
Transactions of the American Mathematical Society. New York. 1900 to 

date. 
I nterrichtsblatter fur Mathematik und Naturwissenschaften. Berlin. 

Current numbers. 
Zeitsehrift fur Mathematik und Physik. Leipzig. Current numbers, 
Zeitsehrift fiir mathematischen und naturwissenschaftlichen Unterricht. 

Leipzig. Current numbers. 

Graduate Courses 
Following are the courses open to graduate students in the De- 
partment. The more elementary courses are not here listed; for 
these see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts. 

21. Theory of Functions. Professor Davisson. 

Throughout the year, two hours a week. 
39. Theory of Groups of Substitutions, Associate Professor IIanna. 

Throughout the year, two hours a week. 
20. Mathematical Reading and Research. Professors Davisson and 
ROTHROCK, Associate Professors IIanna and CARMICHAEL. 

Hours and credits to be arranged. 
~2<\<l. Difference Equations. Associate Professor Carmichael. 

Throughout the year, two hours a week. 
30. Differentia] Geometry. Professor Rothrock. 

Throughout the year, three hours a week. 
I.';. Bessel, Laplace, and Lames, Functions. Associate- Professor Car- 

M rCHAEL. 

Throughout the year, three hours a week. 
H5. Ordinary Differential Equations. Associate Professor Carmichael. 
Throughout the year, three hours n week. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 35 

DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICS AND ASTRONOMY 

WlIBUB A. COQSHALL, Associate Professor of Astronomy. 

Kirkwood Observatory, completed in 1900, is occupied by the 
Department. The building contains a library and computing room; 
a Lecture room; dark room; a transit room, in which are a Bamberg 
universal instrument, a Howard sidereal clock, a mean time chron- 
ometer, and a chronograph; a dome twenty-six feet in diameter; 
and a. room of the same size immediately below. In the dome is the 
refracting telescope, of which the 12-inch objective is by Brashear, 
and the mounting by Warner and Swasey, of Cleveland. The 
instrument has a focal length of about 15 feet, and is supplied with 
eyepieces magnifying from 130 to nearly 1,000 diameters ; also 
with polarizing helioscope, diagonal eyepiece, and an electrically 
illuminated micrometer; there are both coarse and fine circles in 
right ascension and declination, the fine circles having reading 
microscope and electrical illumination. 

The Department has in a separate building, a mounting, de- 
signed and built by the Department, that carries a 4-inch Browning 
refractor, a 5-inch portrait lens and an 8-inch parabolic mirror, for 
the photography of comets, nebulae, etc. 

For an account of the Lawrence Fellowship in Astronomy, see 
page — . 

The Department receives telegraphic bulletins of discoveries 
made at American and European observatories. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the 
Department. The more elementary courses are not here listed ; for 
these see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under that 
heading in the University catalogue. 

14. Orbits of Spectroscopic Binaries. Associate Professor Cogshall. 
Winter term, T. Th., at 2:00. 

8. Theoretical Mechanics. Mr. Drew. 

Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 9:00. 

15. Celestial Mechanics. An introductory course. Mr. Drew. 
Spring term. M. W. F., at 11 :0O. 

Open to students who have passed in Course 7. 

12. Theoretical Astronomy. Integration of equations of motion; com- 

putation of orbits and ephemerides. Mr. Drew. 
Fall term. Hours and credits to be arranged with each student. 

13. Astronomical Research. A limited number of students will be per- 

mitted to undertake research work under the supervision of the 
Department. The equipment is best suited for work in astron- 



36 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

uniy of precision and celestial photography. Associate Professor 
Cogshall and Mr. Deew. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms. Hours and credit arranged with 
each student. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS 

Arthur L. Foley, Professor. 

Rolla R. Ramsey, Associate Professor. 

The Department offers a full course leading to the degree of 
Ph.D. 

The supply of apparatus for the presentation of courses in 
modern experimental physics is fairly complete. The equipment 
and facilities for work have been largely increased during the past 
three years, especially in the way of delicate instruments and 
accurate standards for advanced study. 

The Library of the Department of Physics contains about six 
hundred volumes, exclusive of sets of several journals. The fol- 
lowing magazines are on file: 'Annalen der Physik', 'Annates de 
Chimie et de Physique', 'Beiblatter zu den Annalen der Physik', 
' Physikalische Zeitschrift', 'The Electrical World and Engineer', 
'The Electrician' (London), 'Journal de Physique', 'The Philo- 
sophical Magazine', 'The Physical Review', 'The Proceedings of 
the Physical Society of London', 'The Proceedings of the Royal 
Society', 'Le Radium', 'School Science and Mathematics', 'Science 
Abstracts' (A and B), 'Scientific American and Supplement'. 'The 
Western Electrician', ' Gassier 's Magazine', and 'The Manual Train- 
ing Magazine'. Students have access also to the journals on file in 
the general library, and in the libraries of other Departments. Of 
these may be named: "The American Journal of Science', 'The 
Astrophysical Journal', 'The Engineering and Mining Journal', 
'The Engineering Magazine', 'Nature', 'Coniptes Ivendus', and 
'Science'. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the 
Department. The more elementary courses are n.o-1 here listed; for 
these see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under that 
In ading in the I rniversity catalogue. 

1 — - The Electromagnetic Theory of Light. Professor Foley. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 9:00. 
Wood, •optics-. 

13. Advanced Mathematical electricity. Associate Professor Ramsey. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 8:00. 
Webster, 'Electricity and Magnetism'. 



GBADUATE SCHOOL 37 

;;i. Sound. Mathematical and physical properties of the vibration of 
sound-producing bodies, such as strings, rods, plates, air columns, 
membranes, etc. Assistant Professor Dutcher. 
Pall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 10:00. 
ii//. Laboratory Practice in Spectroscopy and Photometry. Associate 
Professor Ramsey. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring (onus. T. Th., at 2 :()(). 
14. Advanced Laboratory Methods and Research. Professor Foley. 

Fall, Wilder, and Spring terms, daily, at 1 :00. 
l'l*. Current Physical Literature. Professor Foley. 

Two hours a work throughout the year, at an hour to be appointed. 
30. Advanced Theoretical Physics. A critical study of standard trea- 
tises and memoirs. Professor Foley. 
Two hours a. week, at a time to he appointed. 

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

Robert F. Lyons, Professor. 

Louts S. Davis, Professor. 
Oliver W. Brown, Associate Professor. 
Frank ( !. Mathers, Associate Professor. 
Clarence E. May, Associate Professor. 

The Department of Chemistry has general, special, and private 
laboratories, a laboratory room, a lecture room, balance rooms, an 
incubator room, a stock room, museum, etc. Special laboratories 
are provided for electrochemistry, assaying' and electric furnace 
work, organic, inorganic and physiological chemistry, water and 
gas analysis, spectroscopic analysis. The laboratories comprise 
eleven large, well-lighted rooms, equipped with workstands, capable 
of accommodating two hundred and seventy-five students. Each 
room is provided with fume hoods and air tight registers connected 
with a ventilating fan for the removal of offensive and poisonous 
gases. 

The general equipment for graduate work, including laboratory 
and library facilities, has been materially increased during the 
past year. 

Special attention is <*iven to inorganic, organic, physiological, 
and physical chemistry and to electrochemistry, technical analyti- 
cal chemistry, and electro-metallurgy. 

The graduate work of the Department, leading to the degree 
A.M. and Ph.D., comprises advanced laboratory, lecture, library 
and seminary work in the lines indicated above, and special grad- 
uate courses described below. A thesis embodying original investi- 
gation is required for an advanced degree. 



38 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

The laboratories for advanced work and the departmental Li- 
brary are open from 8 :00 a.m to 5 :00 p.m. There are no classes in 
the laboratories; each student works independently. A five-hour 
laboratory course requires two and one-half actual hours of labora- 
tory work daily. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in this 
Department. The more elementary courses are not here listed ; for 
these see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under that 
heading in the University catalogue. 

1!>. Physical Chemistry. Laboratory work. Associate Professor Brown. 

22. Electrochemistry. Associate Professor Brown and Mr. Carlisle. 
Winter term. (.1) Lectures, T. Tin, at 8:00. (B) Laboratory, M. 

W. F., 1 :00 to 4 :50. 

23. Electrochemistry. Associate Professor Brown ami Mr. Carlisle. 
Spring term. (A) Lectures, T. Th., at 8:00. (B) Laboratory, M. W. 

F., 1 :0O to 4 :50. 
29. Storage Batteries. Lectures and laboratory work. Associate Pro- 
fessor Brown. 
Fall term. 
13. Elementary Metallurgy and Assaying. Lectures and laboratory 
work. Associate Professor Brown and Mr. Carlisle. 
Fall term. Lectures. T. Th., at 8:00; laboratory work, F. S., 8:00 
to 11:50. 
15. Advanced Technical and Engineering Analysis. Laboratory work. 
Associate Professor Mathers. 
Spring term, daily. 
.*!2. Gasi and Fuel Analysis. Lectures and laboratory work. Associate 
Professor Mathers. 
Winter term, three hours a week. 
.*!.';. Spectrum Analysis and Sugar Analysis. Lectures and laboratory 
work. Associate Professor Mathers. 
Fall term, two bonis a week. 
2G. Chemical Engineering. Associate Professor Brown. 

Fall term. Lectures, M. W. F., at 8:00. 
11. Seminary. Reports on current literature and special topics. (1) 
Pall term: [norganic Chemistry. Associate Professor Mathers. 
(2) Winter term: Organic Chemistry. Professor Lyons and 
Associate Professor May. (.'!» Spring term: Electrochemistry 
and Industrial Chemistry. Associate Professor Brown and As- 
sociate Professor May. 
Pall, Winter, and Spring terms, Th., at. 7:00 p.m. 
[2a. Research in Organic or Physiological Chemistry. Professor Lyons 
;in«l \ssuri,ito Professor May. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily. 8:00 l<> r>:(M). 
126. Research in the Chemistry of the Alkaloids. Professor Davis. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 8:00 to 5 : 00. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 139 

l!_v. Research in Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry. Associate 
Professor Brown. 
Pall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 8:00 to 5:00. 

I2d. Research in rnorganic Chemistry. Associate Professor Mathers. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 8:00 to 5:00. 
L8c. Advanced Physical Chemistry. Lectures <>n selected chapters of 
Physical Chemistry. Associate Professor Brown. 

Spring term, T. Th.. at an hour to be arranged. 
lM. Advanced Electrochemistry and Electro-Metallurgy. (A) Lectures 
on the design and operation of commercial electric furnaces and 
on electric furnace processes and products. (B) Advanced labo- 
ratory work and research in pure and applied electrochemistry 
and electro-metallurgy, including investigations in electric fur- 
nace work, refining and extraction of metals, electro-synthesis 
of organic and inorganic compounds, manufacture of storage 
batteries, and of industrial electrochemical processes. Associate 
Professor Brown. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms. Laboratory work, daily, 8 :00 to 
4:50; lectures. Winter term, F., at S :0O. 

Students in this course are recommended to take Physics 10 and 21. 
:2o. Advanced Organic Chemistry. A continuation of Course 6. (A) 
Lectures and recitations on selected chapters of organic chem- 
istry. (B) Laboratory work or research in synthetic or ana- 
lytical organic chemistry. Associate Professor May. 

(A) Winter and Spring terms, T. Th., 11:00. (B) Fall, Winter, 
and Spring terms, daily, S :00 to 4 :50. 

Cohen, "Textbook of Organic Chemistry'; Roscoe and Scliorlemer, 
'Treatise on Chemistry' ; Hammersten, 'Physiological Chemistry' ; 
Hensler-Pond, 'Terpenes'. 

Presupposes Courses 6 1 , G 2 , 7. 
31. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. Laboratory work. The preparation 
and study of the properties and reactions of the different com- 
pounds of the rare and uncommon elements, followed by re- 
search. This includes a review of the literature relating to the 
element that is being studied. Associate Professor Mathers. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., 8:00 to 4:50. 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY 

Edgar R. Comings, Professor. 

Joshua W. Beede, Associate Professor. 

The work offered by the Department, leading to the Ph.D. de- 
gree, consists largely of research. Courses 10 and 13 are entirely 
of this nature. The problems offered for investigation are confined 
for the most part to stratigraphic geology and paleontology, al- 
though several studies in economic and geographic geology have 
also been published by members of the department. 



40 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

In stratigraphic geology the subjects covered by the researches 
of the Department have been concerned chiefly with the Ordo-vieian 
and Mississippian rocks of Indiana, and with the Upper Carbon- 
iferous and Permian rocks of Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas. In 
pure paleontology, the Department is especially equipped for the 
study of problems in the development of Paleozoic Brachiopoda and 
Bryozoa. Considerable work has already been published in this 
field. 

For the prosecution of researches along the lines indicated above, 
the Department is adequately equipped. The collections of fossils 
are especially rich in material from the Ordovician, Silurian, and 
Mississippian of Indiana, and from the Upper Carboniferous and 
Permian of Kansas and Texas. The latter collections are among 
the best in America. A special feature of all these collections is the 
wealth of screenings containing immature stages of Brachiopoda, 
Bryozoa, and other fossils. 

The laboratory equipment contains the usual apparatus for the 
preparation of material, and machinery for cutting, grinding and 
polishing thin sections of fossils. An enlarging and microphoto- 
graphic camera with special lighting appliances and combinations 
of lenses for a wide range of work, is available as an aid in the 
proper illustration of paleontological material. 

The Department receives the principal American and European 
periodicals dealing with geology, paleontology, and geography. 

Following are tin 1 courses open to graduate students in the De- 
partment. The more elementary courses are not here listed; for 
these see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under that 
heading in the University catalogue. 

.'!. Economic Geology. A discussion of the non-metallic materials, such 
.-is clays, cement, coal, oil and pis. building stones, etc Asso- 
ciate Professor Beede. 
Winter term, daily, at LO:00. 
5. Systematic Paleontology. Laboratory study of fossil invertebrates. 
Professor Cumtngs and Associate Professor Beede. 
Fnll. Winter, and Spring terms, two to live hours, at times to be 
arranged. 
7)<i. Evolution A study of the geologic factors in evolution; the origin 
of the oldest Caunas; age of the earth, etc. Professor Cumings. 
Winter term, at an hour to be arranged. 
10. Research, investigation ol geological and paleontological problems. 
A careful report on each investigation is required, in proper form 
for publication. Professor Cumings and Associate Professor 
Pr.i hi', 
.'.ill. Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 9:00 to I :•"»(). 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 41 

13, Advanced Field Work. Continuous work in the l it* I * I for a month 

or inure in th<> summer, fall, or spring. This course will usually 
form part of the research work submitted for an advanced de- 
gree. The work must be largely independent, hut will always 
be under the general oversight of a member of the department. 

14. Stratigraphic Geology. A study of the literature of the various 

geologic systems. The history of their investigation, and the 
present knowledge of their divisions, distribution, faunas, and 
paleography will be fully considered. Professor Oumings. 
Fall. Winter, and Spring terms. Lectures, T. Th., at 10:00. 



DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY 

David M. Mottier, Professor. 

Frank M. Andrews, Associate Professor. 

James M. Van Hook, Assistant Professor. 

Graduate work leading to the degree of Master of Arts in 
Botany comprises special studies along* some line indicated in the 
advanced courses enumerated below, or the investigation of some 
problem of a mare limited scope. For the degree of Doctor of Phil- 
osophy, the subject of the thesis is selected from some line of morph- 
ology, cytology, physiology, or mycology. Space is provided for 
four students, and for the work undertaken the equipment is 
adequate. 

The departmental library contains the more necessary works of 
reference, and the principal botanical journals. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the De- 
partment, The more elementary courses are not here listed; for 
these see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under that 
heading in the University catalogue. 

4. Morphology of Fungi. Assistant Professor Van Hook. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 1:00 to 3:00. 

5. Physiology. Associate Professor Andrews. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily. 

0. Cytology. Professor Mottier. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily. 
~\<t. Research in Physiology. Special studies will he offered to those pur- 
suing work fur advanced degrees. Associate Professor Andrews. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily. 
7. Research in Morphology and Cytology. Problems for special in- 
vestigation in morphology and cytology will he assigned to stu- 
dents who are prepared to undertake original work. Professor 
Mottier. 
Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, daily. 



42 INDIANA UNIVEKSITY 

13. Morphology of the Algae. A study of the life-history and of the 
development of vegetative and reproductive organs in certain 
algae. The work is confined very largely to fresh-water forms. 
Professor Mottier. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily. 
18. Investigations in Mycology and Plant. Pathology. Assistant Pro- 
fessor Van Hook. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 1:00 to 3:00. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY 

Carl H. Eigenmann, Professor and Director of the Biological Station. 
Febnandus Payne, Associate Professor. 
Will Scott, Assistant Professor. 

Full work leading to the degree Ph.D. is offered in Course 6. It 
is purely a research course, and offers the widest choice of subjects 
permitted by the equipment of the Department. 

The subjects selected have radiated from centers. One of several 
of these is the problem, or problems, of the freshwater fauna of trop- 
ical America. At present the Department is engaged in a study of 
divergent evolution as shown by the tropical American characin 
fishes. 

The Department is well equipped for this work. The most im- 
portant of the Zoological collections is the collection of fishes, com- 
prising many thousand specimens. Arrangements have been made 
for cooperation with various other institutions, by which the largest 
aggregation in the world of collections of South American fresh- 
water fishes is available for the monographs in preparation. By 
speciaJ arrangement the collections of Harvard University, made 
by Professor L. Agassi/ and his assistants during the Thayer ex- 
pedition, and by others. <\vc available for the monograph on the 
American (Miaracins. 

r J no Department lias entered into close relations with the Car- 
negie Museum of Pitteburg. Under the direction of Dr. W. J. 
Holland, director of this Museum, Mr. John llaseman. A.M., '07, 
during 1907-1910, explored the coast rivers of Brazil, Uraguay, and 
Argentina, between the Rio San Francisco and Buenos Aires. He 
ascended the Rio Paraguay, crossed to Hie Gun pore and descended 
that rivm- and the Rio Madeira to Manaos, on the Amazon, making 
collect ions on I he \v;;\. 

Prom Aiujust to December-, 1908, Professor Eigenmann, with 
Mr. S Iv Shideler as volunteer assistant, explored the Demerara, 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 43 

Essequibo, and Potaro rivers of British Guiana. Vevy extensive 
collections were made in the lowland, as well as above the Kaieteur, 
a verticaJ fall of 741 feet of the Potaro river. The results of the 
expedition have been published by the Carnegie Museum as reports 
of the British Guiana Expedition of Indiana University and the 
Carnegie Museum. The final report on "The Freshwater Fishes 
of British Guiana" was issued in August, 1912. 

Prom January to April, 1912, Professor Eigenmann made col- 
lections in the San Juan, Atrato, Dagua, Cauea, and Magdalena 
rivers in Colombia. 

During January to April of 1913 Mr. Charles Wilson and Mr. 
Arthur TTenn explored the Patia River of Southwestern Colom- 
bia and supplemented the work done the preceding year in 
the San Juan and Atrato Basins of Colombia. Their work 
was made possible by the generosity of Mr. Hugh McK. Landon 
and Mr. Carl G. Fisher of Indianapolis, Mr. Landon has gener- 
ously provided, the means to enable Mr. Henn to extend the work 
into Ecuador. 

The second center of departmental interest has been, and is, the 
subject of heredity, especially: (A) The history of the Sex Cells 
(B) Variation, (C) The rate of ontogenic and phylogenic modifica- 
tion of the sense organs of Cave Animals, (D) Experimental 
Zoology. 

For the study of cave animals (C) the facilities of the Depart- 
ment are ideal. The University is located at the edge of the great 
cave region of the Mississippi valley. By act of the Legislature, the 
Donaldson estate near Mitchell, * Indiana, has been placed in the 
keeping of the trustees of Indiana University. On it are situated 
numerous sinkholes, dry caves, and an underground water-course at 
least two miles long. This underground river is rich in blind fishes 
and other blind acquatie animals. A small laboratory has been 
erected on the farm, and is in charge of a research fellow, appointed 
from year to year. In the study of cave animals the Department 
has in the past had the cooperation of the Carnegie Institution, the 
American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the 
Elizabeth Thompson Science Fund. 

For the study of variation (B) in non-migratory vetebrates in 
a 'unit of environment' this Department organized and has since 
maintained a fresh-water Biological Station. It is at present lo- 
cated on Winona Lake, Kosciusko County, Indiana, in the grounds 

*By a rec3iit d:cision of th"; Supreme Court, the act placing the management of this land in the 
hund-i of th ! trmtei 8 of Indiana University has been deeided to be unconstitutional. 



44 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

of the Winona Assembly. The Station owns, as a gift of the Winona 
Assembly, two buildings, 20x45 feet, each two stories high. The 
buildings are on the lake front, at the month of Cherry Creek. The 
Station also owns boats, nets, sounding and temperature apparatus, 
glassware, etc. Microscopes and other needed apparatus are moved 
to the Station from the University. 

For the study of sex cells (A), and Experimental Zoology (D), 
the Department owns all the necessary apparatus and the surround- 
ings of the University otfer an abundance of material. The Depart- 
ment also owns collections gathered in the vicinities of .Jackson, 
Miss., Salt Lake City, Los Angeles, Tucson, El Paso, and San 
Antonio by Professor Payne. 

A third line of work undertaken by the Department is the survey 
of Indiana Lakes. Ilydrographie maps of the lakes are being made, 
the physical and chemical conditions determined, and the various 
biological phenomena analyzed. 

The field work for these investigations is done in the summer, 
the Biological Station on Winona Lake being used as a base. The 
solution ponds in the region of the University are being utilized for 
comparative studies. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the 
Department. The more elementary courses are not here listed; for 
these sec the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under that 
heading in the University catalogue. 

."». Advanced Zoology. Professor Eigenmann and Assistant Professors 
Payne and Scott. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, five hours: a week. 
I. General Biological Problems: (.1) The development of the idea of 
evolution and Darwinism; (B) The laws of heredity. Professor 

ElGENMANN. 

Spring term, daily, at 9:00. 
5. Seminary. Weekly meetings of advanced students and instructors to 
discuss currenl literature and reporl on investigations in 
progress. Professor Eigenmann and Associate Professor Payne. 

Fall, Wilder, and Spring terms, M., at t :0O. 
0. Research. Special investigation of zoological problems, with a re- 
port on each investigation. Branches in which subjects have in 
the pasi been selected and reported upon are Variation, Degen- 
eration, Regeneration, Sense Organs, Embryology, Faunal and 
Systematic Studies of Fishes, Ecology of Cave and Freshwater 
Animals. Cell and Chromosome Studies. For a fuller statement, 
see the general statement of the Department. Professor Eigen- 
m\.\\. Associate Professor Payne, and Assistant Professor Scott. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms. S:00 to 4:50. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 45 

7. Biological Survey. A continuation of the previous work in the 
physical and biological features of Winona Lake and its en- 
virons. Professor Eigenmann, Assistant Professor Scott. 
Summer term, at the Biological Station. 

DEPARTMENT OF ANATOMY 

Burton D. Myers, Professor. 
Augustus G. Pohlman, Professor. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the 
Department. The more elementary courses are not here listed; for 
these see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under that 
heading in the University catalogue. 

18. Research Work. Opportunity for research work is offered to ad- 
vanced students who may have at least one-half their time for 
one year free for the work. Professors Myers and Pohlman. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, at hours to be appointed. 
15. Advanced Course in Anatomy. Open to students who have com- 
pleted the dissection of the human body, Course 8, and desire 
to do special or advanced work. Professors Myers and Pohlman. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, at hours to be appointed. 

PHYSIOLOGY 

William J. Moenkhaus, Professor. 
Clarence Edmondson, Teaching Fellow. 

Facilities for research leading to the higher degrees are avail- 
able within restricted lines in general physiology. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the 
Department. The more elementary courses are not here listed ; for 
these see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under that 
heading in the University catalogue. 

<i. Advanced Physiology. Professor Moenkhaus. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, at hours to be arranged. 

10. Research. Problem work in certain phases of general physiology 

may be taken by those properly equipped. Professor Moenkhaus. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 8:00 to 4:50. 

11. Seminary. 



46 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

EDUCATION 

William W. Black, Professor and Dean. 
Elmeb E. Jones, Professor. 
W. F. Book, Professor. 

Henry Lester Smith, Lecturer on Education. 

Graduate work is offered in the School of Education, and special 
programs leading to the A.M. and Ph.D. degrees, with the Master's 
and Doctor's certificates of Education, will be arranged on appli- 
cation. 

A student whose undergraduate major was in another depart- 
ment will usually be given opportunity to do in one year the work 
for the A.M. degree in Education. The work will include such 
undergraduate courses in Education as may be necessary as a basis 
for graduate work. 

In the future, as in the past, the best work of students in the 
courses in research work will be published. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the 
School. The more elementary courses are not here listed ; for these 
or for fuller statements of the courses below, see the bulletin of the 
School of Education, or under that heading in the University 
catalogue. 

6. History of Education. Professor Jones. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 8:00. 

10. Philosophy of Education. Professor Jones. 

Fail, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 8:00. 
1"). School Administration. Mr. Smith. 

Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 10:0O. 
L6a. Educational Seminary. Professor Jones. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T., at 7:00 p.m. 
!<;/>. Educational Seminary. Elementary Education. Professor Black. 

Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, M., at 7:00 p.m. 

17. Advanced Educational Psychology. Professor Book. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms. M. W. F., ;it lo : oo. 

o. Orthogenics. Professor Jones. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms. T. Th., at 3:00. 

11. Principles or Organization and Supervision. Professor Black. 
Fall, Winter, :ui<l Spring terms, T. Th., al LO :00. 

1.9. Experimental Pedagogy. Professor Book. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms. T. Th., at 11:00. 

18. Research in Education. 

a. The Problems of the Elementary School. Professor Bla< k. 
I). 'The History and Philosophy of Education. Professor JONES. 

c. The Psychology of the Processes of Education. Professor 

Pool'. 

d. Secondary Education. Professor Book. 



Students Registered in the Graduate 
School, 1912-1913 

S, Summer term. F, Fall term. W, Winter term. Sp, Spring term. 

Alx'll, Jasper August Middletown, Ind. 

A. B., 1910, Indiana University. Education S. 

Aley, Max Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1911, Indiana University. English F. 

Alger, Louise Florence Wabash, Ind. 

A. B., 1908, Indiana University. English F. W. Sp. 

Allen, William Ray Hartfort City, Ind. 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. Zoology Sp. 

Anderson, Jean Jussen Wabash, Ind. 

A. B., 1911, Indiana University. German S. 

Andrews, Mrs. Marie Opperman Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1902, Indiana University; A. M., Botany F. W. 

1903, Wellesley. 
Artman, Oliver Clarence Noblesville, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. Sociology S. F. W. Sp. 

Ashbaugh, Ernest James Marion, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. Education F. W. Sp. 

Teaching Fellow in Education. 
Baldwin, Mary Westfield, Ind. 

A. B., 1910, Earlham College. English Sp. 

Barbre, Mrs. Nellie May Ensley Rockville, Ind. 

A. B., 1907, De Pauw University. German S. 

Barr, Hugh Harlan Elwood, Ind. 

A. B., 1908. Education S. 

Baughman, Nellie May Rockfield, Ind. 

A. B., 1909, Indiana University. Mathematics. . . .F. W. Sp. 

Beeker, Ruby Mildred Battle Ground, Ind. 

A. B., 1910, Indiana University. German S. 

Benedict, Laura Augusta Paragon, Ind. 

A. B., 1909, Indiana University. English S. 

Bennett, Lawrence Hill Indianapolis, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. History S. 

Black, Edward Elmer Hanover, Ind. 

B. S., 1912, Hanover, Col. History S. 

Bourn, Frederick E Stilesville, Ind. 

A. B., 1911, Indiana University. Education S. 

Bowlus, Genevieve Williamsport, Ind. 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. Latin Sp. 

Breitwieser, Thomas John Tipton, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. Education F. W. Sp. 

Teaching Fellow in Philosophy. 

(47) 



48 INDIANA UNIVEBSITY 

Brown. Hugh Everett Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. Physics F. W. Sp. 

Teaching Fellow in Physics. 
Brownfield, Lilian Beeson South Bend, Ind. 

A. B., 1895, De Pauw University; A. M., English F. W. Sp. 

1904, OhioWesleyan. 
Broyles, Bertha Lee Ellendale, N. Dak. 

A. B., 1905, Indiana University. English S. 

Broyles. William Anderson Ellendale, N. Dak. 

B. S., Tri-State College; A. B., 1905. Education S. 

Indiana University. 

Bruner. Charley Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1910, Indiana University. Education F. W. Sp. 

Burke, Robert E Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. Fine Arts F. W. Sp. 

Burke, Walter Demoree Bloomfield, Ind. 

A. B., 1908, Indiana University. Education S. 

Butcher. Ralph Emerson Harrodsburg, Ind. 

A. B., 1911, Indiana University. Education S. 

Bvbee, Halbert Pleasant Rochester, Ind. 

B. S., Rochester Normal School; A. B., Geology F. W. Sp. 

1912, Indiana University; A. M., 

1912, Indiana University. 

Teaching Fellow in Geology. 
Cassell, Lucile Helen Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B.. 1911, Indiana University. Education Sp. 

Cauble, Christopher C Clayton, Ind. 

A. B., 1910, Indiana University. Education S. 

(Mark, John Roscoe Worthington, Ind. 

A. H., 1912, Indiana University. Psychology S. 

( line Laura Russell Jonesboro, Ind. 

A. B., 1905, Indiana University. German S. 

Cockrell, Emerson Tracy Franklin, Ind. 

A. H., 1912, Franklin College. History (?) S. 

Cos, John Ira Lee Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. S. 

( lonrad, Fred Allen Sterling, Ohio. 

A. B.. 1912, Goshen College. Sociology F. W. Sp. 

State Fellow. 
Cook. Stanley Vance Crestes, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana I 'niversity. Chemistry F. W. Sp. 

Teaching Fellow in Chemistry. 
Cox. James Emery Oakland City, Ind. 

A. IV. 1911, Oakland City College. English F. W. Sp. 

Craig, Everetl Harrison Seymour, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana .University. Chemistry S. 

Curtis, Ernesl Bain Martinsville, Ind. 

A. B., 1912. Indiana (niversity. Chemistry F. W. Sp. 

Teaching Fellow in ( Jhemistry. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 49 

Cuzzort, Belvia Ethel English, [nd. 

A. B., 1912. [ndiana University. Education F. W. Sp. 

Teaching Fellow in Education. 
Davis, Elizabeth Louise Jeffersonville, End. 

A. B., 1910, Indiana University, Latin F. 

Davis, Walter Allison Blooming-ton, Ind. 

A. B., 1907, Indiana University. Education S. 

Densford, Harlem Eugene Crothersville, Ind. 

A. B., 1907, Indiana University; A. M., English F. \V. Sp. 

1910, Indiana University. 
Doehleman, Zenol Ruth Lebanon, Ind. 

A. B., 1905, Indiana University. German S. 

Dutcher, John B Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1906, Indiana University; A. M., Physics F. W. Sp. 

1907, Indiana University. 
DuValle, Sylvester Howard Indianapolis, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Butler College. Education F. W. Sp. 

Easley, Katherine New Albany, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. English F. W. Sp. 

Eddingfield, June Crawfordsville, Ind. 

A. B., 1906, Indiana University. German S. 

Edmondson, Clarence Edmund Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1906; A. M., 1912, Indiana Uni- Physiology F. W. Sp. 

versity. 
Eikenberry, Dan Harrison Kokomo, Ind. 

A. B., 1911, Indiana University. Education S. 

Elliott, Otis Eminence, Ind. 

A. B., 1909, Indiana University. English S. 

Esarey, Logan Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1905; A. M., 1909, Indiana Uni- History F. W. Sp. 

versity. 

Research Fellow in History. 
Fern, Gilbert Horney Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Butler College. Philosophy F. W. Sp. 

State Fellow. 
Freshwater, Ernest B Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1907, Ohio Wesleyan. Latin F. W. Sp. 

Galloway, Jesse James Cromwell, Ind. 

A. B., 1909; A. M., 1911, Indiana Uni- Geology F. W. Sp. 

versity. 
Gerichs, William Christian Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1907, Indiana University. History S. 

Gilmer, Harold Wright Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1904, Monmouth College. Latin F. W. Sp. 

Glascock, David Albert Veedersburg, Ind. 

A. B., Wabash College. Zoology S. 

Goad, Winfred Lewellyn Sulphur, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. Elducation S. 

Goss, Mrs. Alice Diven Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1908, Indiana University. German 



50 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

Grable, Theodore Eli Montgomery, Ind. 

A. B.. 1907; A. M., 1910. Indiana Uni- History W. 

versity. 
Graham, Hope Whit comb Indianapolis, Ind. 

A. B., 1911, Butler College; A. M., History S. 

1912, Indiana University. 
Grantham, Guy Everett Ladoga, Ind. 

A. B., 1909, Indiana University. Physics S. 

Grosswege, Bertha Regina Avilla, Ind. 

A. B., 1911, Indiana University. German S. 

Hacker, William A Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. Education S. 

Hanna, Elizabeth May Roachdale, Ind. 

A. B., 1910, Indiana University. Latin S. 

Hansford, Hazel Irene Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. English Sp. 

Harlan. Clara May 

B. S., 1906, Valparaiso University; Latin Sp. 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. 

Hart, Ella Bond Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1892; A. M., 1912, Indiana Uni- English S. 

versity. 
Haworth, Clarence Kokomo, Ind. 

A. B., 1908, Indiana U/niversity. History S. 

Hazard, Clifton Terrell Wilmington, O. 

A. B., 1906, Wilmington College. Mathematics S. 

Hennel, Edith Amelia Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1911; A. M., 1912, Indiana Uni- Botany F. W. Sp. 

versity. 

Teaching Fellow in Botany. 
Henry, Edna Gertrude Indianapolis, Ind. 

A. B.. 1897, Indiana University. Economics F. W. Sp. 

Henry, ( rlenwod W Danville, 111. 

A. B., 190o7, Wabash College. Zoology S. W. Sp. 

Hess, John Ambrose Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1908, Kansas University; A. M., German S. F. W. Sp. 

1910, Kansas University. 
Hitchcock, Wiley Elmore, Ind. 

A. B.. 1908, Indiana SI. Normal. Chemistry (?)... S. F. W. Sp. 

Hoffman, Marion Mardick Indianapolis, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. German S. 

Hogate, .Jessie M Bloomington, Ind. 

I'll. B., 1899, Allegheney College, History S. F. 

Meadville, Pa. 
Hogue, Rolla Martin Wheatland, Ind. 

A. B.. 1910, Indian.i University. History S. 

Holmes. Mrs. Edith DuVall Lebanon, Ind. 

A. B.. 1908, Indiana University. Botany S. 

Holiman, Willie Newton Petroleum, Ind. 

A. I'.. L913, Indiana University. Education Sp. 



GBADUATB SCHOOL 51 

Horner, Mary Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1905; A. M., L908, Indiana Uni- German S. 

versity. 

Horton. Deo Wesley Hoovers, Ind. 

A. B., L909, Indiana University. Education S. 

Howard, Jesse Myers Clermont, Ind. 

A. B., 1911, Indiana University. Economics F. 

Hutchinson. Nathaniel F Huntingburg, Ind. 

A. B.. 1911. Indiana University. Education (?).... S. 

[sley, Floy ' Shelbyville, Ind. 

A. B., 1911, Indiana University. History. F. 

Jackson. Thomas Franklin Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. Geology Sp. 

Johnson, William Piatt Sheffield, Ala. 

B. Fed.. 1901, Kentucky State Uni- Education S. 

versity. 

Kins. Ruby Olive Bloomington. Ind. 

A. B.. 1909, Indiana University. English S. 

Kinnick. Otto Claude Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1910, Indiana University. English S. 

Kuebler, John Ralph Mt. Vernon, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. Physics S. 

Kimmel. Margaret Mollie Lafontaine, Ind. 

A. B., 1911, Indiana University. English F. 

Latzke. Frances Renshaw New York City. 

A. B., 1912, Columbia University. French F. W. Sp. 

Linton, Ernest Marshall Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1911, Butler College; A. M., 1912, History F. W. Sp. 

Indiana University. 

Teaching Fellow in History. 
List, Earle Beegen Franklin, Ind. 

B. S., Franklin College. Biology (?) S. 

Lee. Ira Elver Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1911; A. M., 1912, Indiana Uni- Chemistry S. 

versity. 
Leonard, Adam Ahi Hillsboro, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. History S. 

McCartney, Fred Morton Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. Philosophy F. W. Sp. 

McCloskey, Mary Magdalene Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. English F. W. Sp. 

Mance, Grover Cleveland Pinebush, N. Y. 

B. S., 1908, Colgate University. Geology W. Sp. 

Marble, Hugh M Jeffersonville, Ind. 

A. B., 1910, Hanover College. Chemistry Sp. 

Mason, Edward HufTord Rossville, Ind. 

A. B., 1911; A. M., 1912, Indiana Uni- Physics S. F. W. Sp. 

versitv. 



52 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

Mason, Thomas Edward Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1905; A. M., 1912, Indiana Uni- Mathematics S. F. W. Sp. 

versity. 

Teaching Fellow in Mathematics. 
Meier, Henry Frederick August Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. Botany S. 

Meyer, Lee Albert Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. English Sp. 

Mikami, Hachishiro Japan. 

A. B., 1909, Waseda University, Japan. Sociology F. W. Sp. 

Milburn, Norma Jane Jasper, Ind. 

A. B., 1910, Indiana University. English S. 

Milburn, Richard M Jasper, Ind. 

A. B., 1903; A. M., 1908, Indiana Uni- History S. 

versity. 
Miller, Alvah Leslie Pasadena, Cal. 

A. B. 1909, Morningside College. Economics F. W. 

Mills, Clifford Newton Franklin, Ind. 

B. S., 1910, Franklin College. Mathematics S. 

Montgomery, Emery Watkins Mt. Vernon, Ind. 

A. B., 1909, Indiana University. History S. 

Montgomery, Bertha Bedford, Ind. 

A. B., 1911, Indiana University. German S. 

Morris, Frank Pekin, Ind. 

B. S., 1907; E, Ped., 1908; Valparaiso Mathematics S. F. W. Sp. 

University; A. B., 1912, Indiana 

University. 

Teaching Fellow in Mathematics. 
Mourer, Harry Hartley Idaville, Ind. 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. History Sp. 

Murphy, Maurice Elzie 

A. B., 1913, Indiana Univerity. History Sp. 

Nay, Bavis Clay Danville, Ind. 

A. B., 1910, Indiana University. Education S. 

Neel, William Finley Akron, Ind. 

A. B., 1908, Indiana University. Education S. Sp. 

Nothnagel, Mildred Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. Botany Sp. 

( >'Neal, Claude Edgar Amo, Ind. 

A. B.. 1911, Indiana University. Botany S. F. W. Sp. 

Teaching Fellow in Botany. 
( )sborn, Ol ho ( Jharles Linton, Ind. 

A. I).. 1911, Indiana University. Education S. 

Palmer, William \orenc Ligonier, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. Chemistry S. F. W. Sp. 

Teaching Fellow in Chemistry. 

Pennington, William Lee Bloomington. End. 

B. Ped., Kentucky State Agricultural Education S. 

and Technical College; A. M., 1912, 

Indiana I 'ni versity. 



GRADU \TK SCHOOL 53 

Pflueger, Luther Appel Turbotville, Pa. 

B. E.. 1900; M. E., 1903, Kutztown German F. W. Sp. 

State Normal; B. A.. 1906, Muhlen- 
berg College. 

Research Fellow in German. 
Pickett, Fermen Layton Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1910, Indiana University. Botany S. F. W. Sp 

Assistant in Botany. 
Prichard, Clarence Edward Greenwood, Ind. 

A. B.. 1912, Butler College. Chemistry F. W. Sp. 

State Fellow. 
Quinn, Mrs. Ally Compton Wilmington, O. 

A. B., 1905. Wilmington College. Botany W. Sp. 

Raber, (nan Levi Wolcottville, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. Botany S. 

Ramsey, Karl E Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1902: A. M., 1910, Indiana Uni- Education F. 

versity. 
Ratliff, Mary Louise Lyons, Ind. 

A. B., 1911, Earlham College. German S. 

Ray, Mary Estella Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1911. Indiana University. Latin S. 

Reagan, Franklin Pearce Tipton, Ind. 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. Zoology Sp. 

Teaching Fellow in Embryology. 
Records, Thomas W Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1901, Indiana University. Physics S. 

Reid, Nina Kathleen Attica, Ind. 

A. B., 1911, Indiana University. History F. W. Sp. 

Reising, John Albert Orleans, Ind. 

B. S., 1893, Valparaiso University; Mathematics S. 

A. B., 1911, Indiana University. 

Richards, Ernest Davis Ingalls, Ind. 

A. B., 1908, Indiana University. Education S. 

Rickard, Sherman Clement Pekin, Ind. 

A. B., 1902, Indiana University. Education S. 

Risley, Lee Harrison Velpen, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. Chemistry S. 

Rizer, Eldridge Benton Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B. 1912, Indiana University. Education S. 

Robbins, Rainard Benton Muncie. Ind. 

A. B., 1909; A. M., 1910, Indiana Uni- Mathematics S. 

versity. 
Sachs, Inez Floyance Towanda, 111. 

A. B., 1903, Westfield College; B. L. S., German (?) F. W. Sp. 

1909, University of Illinois. 
Schlotzhauer, Alma Elizabeth Indianapolis, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. German F. W. Sp 

Scott, Mrs. Xaomi Crumbaugh Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1910, Indiana University. F. 



54 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

Senour, Frank E New Augusta, Ind. 

A. B., 1911, Indiana University. English S. F. \Y. Sp. 

Sharp, Russell Alger Charlestown, Ind. 

A. B., 1911, Indiana University. English S. F. W. Sp. 

Shideler, Samuel Ervin Huntington, Ind. 

A. B., 1909; A. M., 1912, Indiana Uni- Education F. W. Sp. 

versity. 

Teaching Fellow in Education. 
Shockley, Ernest Vivian Angola, Ind. 

A. B., 1909; A. M., 1912, Indiana Uni- History F. W. Sp. 

versity. 

Research Fellow in Education. 
Simmons, Vesta Rhea Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1909, Indiana University. English F. W. Sp. 

Skinner, Charles Henry Fairmount, Ind. 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. Physics (?) W. 

Smith, Bessie Lee Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. Education Sp. 

Smith, Broadus Monroe Franklin, Ind. 

A. B., 1910, Franklin College. Psychology S. 

Smith, John Masson Union City, Ind. 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. French W. Sp. 

Teaching Fellow in French. 
Smith, Ronald Ross Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. Education S. F. VV. Sp. 

Smith, William Oklahoma. 

A. B., 1896, Indiana University. Education S. 

Spain, Helen Gail Indianapolis, Ind. 

A. B., 1910, Wilson College; A. M., English S. 

1911, Indiana University. 
Speeker, ( iuy Greene West Lafayette, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. Mathematics S. 

Stapp, Gail Aliers Hope, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. Chemistry F. W. Sp. 

Teaching Fellow in Chemistry. 
Steimley, Leonard Leo Attica, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. Mathematics F. W. Sp. 

Assistant in Mathematics. 
Stephan, Leon B Huntington, Ind. 

A. IV, 1908, Indiana University. German S. 

Stephenson, Nettie Bedford, Ind. 

A. B., Hill, Indiana University. English S. 

Stewart , Bessie Jean Bloomington, Ind. 

A. I').. 1911, Indiana University. English F. W. Sp. 

Stewart, Clifton Alcott Muncie, Ind. 

A. B., 1911, Indiana University. Chemistry Sp. 

81 ra1 ton, William Timothy Redkey, Ind. 

A. I)., 1906, Indiana University. Mathematics.... S. 

St nil, J nines Grant Bloomington, Ind. 

\. \'>. L893; L. L. B., 1901, Indiana Education S. 

1 diversity. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 55 

Tanke, Clayton Ellsworth Pendleton, Ind. 

A. B., 1912. Indiana University. Chemistry S. 

'Taylor, James Franklin Linton, Ind. 

A. B., 1909, Indiana University. Mathematics S. 

Taylor. Vergie Johnson Bloomfield, Ind. 

A. B., 1910, Indiana University. English S. 

Teeter, Arthur Lewis Monticello, Ind. 

A. B., 1911, Indiana University. Chemistry S. 

'Todd, Lei a Carlton Bloomington, Ind. 

A. H., 1910, Indiana University. English F. 

Tourner, Anna Belle Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B.; A. M., Chicago ITnivcrsity. F. W. 

Trapp, William Oscar Hoboken, N. Y. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. Philosophy F. W. Sp. 

Teaching Fellow in Philosophy. 
Trovillion, Mae C Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. Orthogenics F. W. Sp. 

Ulrey Clayton North Manchester, Ind. 

A. B., 1911, Indiana University. Physics S. 

Ulrey, Sharon S North Manchester, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. History S. 

Valentine, Royal Herbert Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1911, Moores Hill College. Education S. 

Vance, Lola Ella Noblesville, Ind. 

A. B., 1907, De Pauw University; A. M., Zoology F. W. Sp. 

1912, Indiana University. 

Teaching Fellow in Zoology. 
Vickrey, Earl Wayne Akron, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. Geology S. 

Vogel, William Frederick Boonville, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. Education S. 

Walker, Nellie Lucile Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. English F. W. Sp. 

Ward, Ada Leora Moores Hill, Ind. 

B. S., 1909, Moores Hill College. English S. 

Wedeking, Albert Jesse 

A. B., 1908, Valparaiso University; German Sp. 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. 
Werremeyer, Daniel William Ft. Wayne, Ind. 

A. B., 1910, Indiana University. Mathematics S. 

Whitehead, Sarah Anne Inglefield, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. English S. 

Whitemarsh, James Hardin Hardengrove, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. Education S. 

Whitney, Claude Spencer, Ind. 

A. B., 1911, Indiana University. Greek F. W. Sp. 

Research Fellow in Greek. 
Williams, Oscar Harrison Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1905, Indiana University. Education W. 

Wood, Harry Warren Indianapolis, Ind. 

A. B., 1909, Indiana University. Geology S. 



56 INDIANA UNIVERSITY if I 

Woody, Clifford Thorntowri, Ind. 

A. B., 1908, Indiana University. Education S. F. \V. Sp. 

Woolery, Ruth Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. Botany F. W. Sp. 

Teaching Fellow in Botany. 
Zaugg, Walter Albert 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. Education Sp. 

SUMMARY 

Total enrollment of the Summer term 104 

Enrolled for the Summer term only 87 

Total enrollment of the Fall term 72 

Enrolled for the Fall term only 8 

Total enrollment of the Winter term 71 

Enrollment for the Winter term only 3 

Total enrollment of the Spring term 70 

Enrolled for the Spring term only 18 

Enrolled for Winter and Spring terms only 3 

Enrolled for the Summer and Fall terms only 1 

Enrolled for the Fall and Winter terms only 3 

Enrolled for the Summer, Winter, and Spring terms only 1 

Enrolled for the Summer, Fall. Winter and Spring terms 12 

Enrolled for the Fall, Winter, and Spring terms 48 

The Summer term enrollment is in large part different from the 
enrollment of the rest of the year. Only fifteen of the one hundred 
and two Summer term students were in residence during other 
parts of the year and of these thirteen remained during the entire 
year. Of these thirteen nine are holding appointments from the 
University' 






Ui: 



.,., 



Vol. XII, No. 3 



Amu. l/i,/1911 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY 
BULLETIN 




JAM ■• 

GRADUATE SCHOOL 

1914 



Entered as second-class mail matter May 16, 1908, at the post office at Bloomington, 
Indiana, under act of Congress of July 16, 1894 



Contents 



PAGE 

Prefatory Note 5 

( Officers and Faculty of the Graduate School 7 

< }eneb \i Statement of the Graduate School — 

Purpose and Administration 9 

Admission 9 

Fees 10 

The Library 10 

Degrees — 

Master of Arts 11 

Master of Science 11 

Doctor of Philosophy 11 

Application for Degrees 13 

Fellowships — 

Teaching Fellowships 13 

Lawrence Fellowship in Astronomy 14 

Fellowships for Graduates of other Indiana Colleges 14 

Research Fellowships 15 

Special Rule concerning Fellows 15 

University Organizations — 

The Graduate Club 15 

Sigma Xi 15 

Phi Beta Kappa 16 

Departmental Clubs 16 

Departments and Graduate Courses, 1914-15 — 

Greek 17 

Latin 19 

Romance Languages 21 

German 22 

Comparative Philology 24 

English 26 

History and Political Science 28 

Economics and Social Science 31 

Philosophy 32 

Mathematics 33 

Mechanics and Astronomy 36- 

Physics 37 

Chemistry 39 

Geology 41 

Botany 43 

Zoology 44 

Anatomy 47 

Physiology 47 

Education 47 

Register of Students, 1913-14 49 

(3) 



University Calendar 



SUMMER TERM, 1914 



June 25, Thursday. 
June 20, Friday. 



August 5, Wednesday. 
August 6, Thursday. 



Sept. 9, Wednesday. 



Sept. 29, Tuesday. 



Registration and enrollment for the 

Summer term. 
Recitations and lectures begin for the 

First half-term. (Instruction five 

days a week.) 
First half-term ends. 
Recitations and lectures begin for 

Second half-term. (Instruction six 

days a week.) 
Summer term ends. 



FALL TERM, 1914 15 



Sept. 30, Wednesday. 

Nov. 26 and 27, Thursday and Friday. 
Dee. 19, Saturday. 



Registration and enrollment in classes 

for the Fall term. 
Recitations and lectures begin. 
Thanksgiving recess. 
Fall term ends. 



WINTER TERM, 1914-15 



Jan. 5, Tuesday. 

Jan. 6, Wednesday. 
Jan. 20, Wednesday. 
Mar. 27, Saturday, 6 p. in. 



Registration and enrollment in classes 

for the Winter term. 
Recitations and lectures begin. 
Foundation day, a holiday. 
Winter term ends. 



SPRING TERM, 1914 15 



Mar. SI, Wednesday. 

A pril / , Thursday. 

June 19, Saturday, 6. p. ///. 

June 2S, Wednesday. 



Registration and enrollment in classes 

for the Spring term. 
Recitations and lectures begin. 
Spring term ends. 
1 T ni versify Commencement. 



(4) 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



VOL. XII BLOOMINGTON, IND., APRIL 15, 1914 NO. 3 

Entered as second-class mail matter May 16. 1908, at the post-office at Bloomington, Indiana, 
under the act of July ltt, 1894. Published from the University office, Bloomington, Indiana, semi- 
monthly January, February, March, April, May, and June, and monthly July, August, Sep- 
tember, October. November, and December. 



Prefatory Note 



Indiana University is the State University of Indiana., and the 
head of the public school system of the State. It takes its origin 
from the State Seminary, which was established by act of the 
Legislature, approved January 20, 1820. In 1828, the title of the 
Seminary was changed by the Legislature to that of the Indiana 
College ; and in 1838, the University was given its present name. 
In 1867, Indiana University became coeducational. 

The University comprises the following schools : 

The College of Liberal Arts, organized in 1828 ; 

The School of Law, organized in 1842, reorganized in 1889 ; 

The School of Medicine, organized in 1903 ; 

The Graduate School, organized in 1904 ; 

The School of Education, organized in 1908. 

The first advanced degrees, conferred for graduate work, were 
granted in 1882. During the eighties, well defined regulations for 
graduate work and graduate degrees were stated in the University 
catalogue, and a considerable number of graduate students were 
enrolled, especially in the natural sciences. In the years 1882 to 
1893, inclusive, the University graduated fourteen Doctors of 
Philosophy, ninety nine Masters of Arts, and twelve Masters of 
Science. For some years following 1893, however, the degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy was not conferred. 

In 1904, there took place the segregation and formal organiza- 
tion of the Graduate School, and in 1908, the office of Dean of the 
Graduate School was created. 

This number of the Bulletin is devoted to setting forth the 
facilities for graduate work in the several departments of the Uni- 

2—793 (5) 



b INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

versity. Courses intended primarily for graduate students are 
described in full. Brief announcements are given of courses in- 
tended for both graduates and undergraduates. For further de- 
scription of the latter courses, see the bulletin of the College of 
Liberal Arts, or under that heading in the University catalogue. 

The attention of graduates of other Indiana Colleges is invited 
to the announcement on page 14 of ten fellowships recently estab- 
lished by the Board of Trustees, for such students. The value of 
these fellowships is $200 each; they also carry with them exemp- 
tion from contingent and library fees. For further information 
concerning the Graduate School, address. 

The Dean of the Graduate School, 

Bloomington, Indiana. 



Officers and Faculty of the Graduate 

School 



COUNCIL 

Carl H Eigenmann, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology, Dean of the Graduate 
School. 

Robert Edward Lyons, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Arthur Lee Fotey, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 

Albert Frederick Kuersteiner, Ph.D., Professor of Romance Languages. 

Ulysses Grant Weatiierly, Ph.D., Litt.D., Professor of Economics and 
Social Science. 

Ernest Hiram Lindley, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy and Psychology. 

Burton Dorr Myers, A.M., M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

Samuel Bannister Harding, Ph.D., Professor of European History and 
Politics. 

Carl Wilhelm Ferdinand Osthaus, Professor of German. 

Schuyler Colfax Davisson, Sc.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Will David Howe, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

William Wesley Black, A.M., Dean of the School of Education. 

Edgar Roscoe Cumings, Ph.D., Professor of Geology. 

Frank William Tilden, A.M., Associate Professor of Greek. 

Frank Marion Andrews, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Botany. 

Lillian Gay Berry, A.M., Associate Professor of Latin. 

Wilbur Adeem an Cog shall, A.M., Associate Professor of Astronomy. 

Guido Herman Stempel, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Comparative Phi- 
lology. 

FACULTY 

William Lowe Bryan, Ph.D., LL.D., President of the University. 

Horace Addison Hoffman, A.M., Professor of Greek. 

James Albert Woodburn, Ph.D., LL.D., Professor of American History 

and Politics. 
Carl H Eigenmann, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology, and Director of the 

Biological Station. 
Robert Edward Lyons, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 
Arthur Lee Foley, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 
David Myers Mottier, Ph.D., Professor of Botany. 

Albert Frederick Kuersteiner, Ph.D., Professor of Romance Languages. 
Ulysses Grant Weatiierly, Ph.D., Litt.D., Professor of Economics and 

Social Science. 
Ernest Hiram Lindley, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy and Psychology. 
Burton Dorr Myers, A.M., M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 
Samuel Bannister Harding, Ph.D., Professor of European History. 
Amos Shartle Hershey, Ph.D.. Professor of Political Science and Inter- 

national Law. 

(7) 



O IX 1)1 AX A UNIVERSITY 

*Bert John Vos, Ph.D., Professor of German. 

William A Rawles, PhD., Professor of Political Economy. 

Carl Wilhelm Ferdinand Osthaus, A.M.. Professor of German. 

Schuyler Colfax Davisson, Sc.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

David Andrew Rothrock, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 
*Willtam J Moenkhaus, Ph.D.. Professor of Physiology. 
*Louis Sherman Davis, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Warner Fite, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy. 

Will David Howe, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

William Wesley Black, A.M., Dean of the School of Education, and Pro- 
fessor of Elementary Education. 

Elmer Ellsworth Jones, Ph.D., Professor of the History and Philosophy 
of Education. 

Charles Jacob Sembower, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Edgar Roscoe Cumings, Ph.D., Professor of Geology. 
♦William Frederick Book, Ph.D., Professor of Educational Psychology. 

George Davis Morris, A.M., Doct. d'Univ. (Paris). Associate Professor of 
French. 

Frank William Tilden, A.M., Associate Professor of Greek. 

Guido Herman Stempel, A.M., Associate Professor of Comparative Phi- 
lology. 

Rolla Roy Ramsey, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics. 

Oliver W Brown, A.M., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Frank Marion Andrews, Ph.D.. Associate Professor of Botany. 

Lillian Gay Berry, A.M., Associate Professor of Latin. 

Henry Thew Stephenson, A.B., Associate Professor of English. 

Frank Avdelotte, A.M., B.Litt, Associate Professor of English. 

Wilbur Adelman Cogshall, A.M., Associate Professor of Astronomy. 

Flysses Sherman Hanna, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Joshua William Beede, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Geology. 

Frank Greene Bates, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economics. 

Frank Curry Mathers, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Hubert Guy Childs, A.M., Associate Professor of Education. 

Clarence Earl May, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Robert Daniel Carmichael, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics 

Mklyin Everett Haggerty, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology. 

Fernandus Payne, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Zoology. 

Eugene Leser, Ph.D.. Assistant Professor of German. 

James M Van Hook, A.M., Assistant Professor of Botany. 

Richard Ashley Kick, A.M., Assistant Professor of English. 

Will Scott, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

Frank Tenney STOCKTON, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Economics and 
Social Science. 

ALBERT Ludwig KOHLMEIEB, A.M., Instructor in History. 

Kenneth Powers Williams, PhD., Instructor in Mathematics. 

EDGAR W. Koch, A.M., Instructor in Physiology. 

Clarence Edmund Edmundson, A.M., Instructor in Physiology. 



\i. en1 on leave from Auguel I, 1913, to Augusl I, 1914. 



General Statement of the Graduate 

School 



Purpose and Administration. The Graduate School furnishes 
opportunities for advanced work leading to careers in higher edu- 
cation, and in certain lines of investigation. It does not offer work 
Leading to professional degrees in Law or in Medicine. 

The work of the School is a direct continuation of that of the 
College of Liberal Arts ; as such it is the most advanced work in 
education undertaken by the State. The Graduate School stands, 
therefore, at the head of the University, and is the culmination of 
the public school system of the State. 

The School is administered by the Council of the Graduate 
School. It is composed of members of the Faculty representing 
different fields of learning. 

Not all departments of the University are at present equally 
equipped for extended graduate work. In recognition of this fact, 
the amount of graduate work offered by the different departments 
varies. Some departments offer work for the A.M. degree only, 
while others offer work leading to the degree of Ph.D. 

Admission. Students holding a bachelor's degree in Arts, or in 
Science, from Indiana L^niversity, or the same degree, or its equiva- 
lent, from institutions of similar rank, are admitted to the Gradu- 
ate School on presentation of satisfactory credentials, which should 
include a certificate of graduation and a transcript of the college 
record. Persons holding the bachelor's degree from institutions 
whose requirements are considered to lack a year, or more, of being 
the equivalent of the A.B. degree from this institution, are not 
admitted to the Graduate School. They may enter the College of 
Liberal Arts, and are referred to the Dean of the College for their 
standing. Holders of the A.B. degree, or its equivalent, from in- 
stitutions whose requirements lack less than a year of being the 
equivalent of the A.B. degree from this institution, may be ad- 
mitted to the Graduate School. In such cases, work in addition to 
the minimum of forty-five hours for the A.M. degree will be 
required. The amount will be determined in each case by the 
council of the Graduate School. In all cases, the student must 
complete to the satisfaction of the department of the major subject 

(ft) 



10 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

the graduate work required in that department for the A.M., or 
the Ph.D., degree. 

All graduate students will enroll at the beginning of each term, 
and those entering regularly organized classes will submit to the 
same regulations as undergraduate students. Work will in many 
eases be individual and not controlled by a recitation schedule. At 
the time of entrance to the Graduate School, the student must sub- 
mit a plan of the entire work he wishes to present for the master's, 
or doctor's degree. This plan must be approved by the professor 
of the major subject and the Dean of the Graduate School. Grad- 
uate work done before filing such plan will ordinarily not be 
counted toward advanced degrees. 

Fees. Students who are legal residents of the State of In- 
diana are charged a contingent fee of five dollars a term, and a 
library fee of one dollar a term. 

These fees cover in part the cost of the physical maintenance of 
the University, and are not applied to the cost of tuition, which is 
provided wholly by the State. 

Students not legal residents of the State of Indiana, will be 
charged a contingent and library fee amounting to twenty dollars a 
term. For each Summer half-term, half the fee will be charged. 
This fee is in lieu of the regular library and contingent fees noted 
above. 

The laboratory fees in all courses are uniformly one dollar per 
credit hour. 

The gymnasium fee, if the work in physical training is taken, 
is one dollar a term. 

An examination fee of one dollar is charged for each make-up, 
or special, examination. This fee is paid to the Bursar ; his receipt 
when presented to the proper instructor constitutes the authoriza- 
fion for holding the examination. 

The fee for any degree is five dollars, and must be paid to the 
Bursar at least thirty days before graduation. 

The Library. The library of Indiana University at present 
contains ninety-five thousand catalogued volumes. The selection of 
Lhese books has been made with a view to facilitating instruction 
;di(I research. The collection is a well-balanced one, but is especial- 
ly strong in literary and scientific periodicals. The list of periodi- 
cals received and permantely kepi on file by the library numbers 
aboul four hundred, and includes American, English, German, 
French, and, to a less extent, [talian, Spanish, and Swedish publi- 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 11 

rations. The library is made thoroughly usable by a carefully 
prepared card catalogue, by indexes, and by other bibliographical 
aids. The library force consists of a librarian and twelve assist- 
ants, all of whom are at the service of any authorized user of the 
library. 

In the library building are seminary rooms for the Departments 
of History, Economics, English, Philosophy, German, Romance 
Languages, Education, Latin, and Greek. 

In addition to the central library, where the general literary 
and historical collections are housed, there are nine departmental 
collections, of varying sizes, kept in the different University build- 
ings. 

All books, with the exception of periodicals and books reserved 
for reference, may be drawn for home use. Each graduate student 
may draw five books for two weeks, with privilege of renewal. 

The library is open Monday to Friday, from 7 :45 a.m. to 10 -.00 
p.m., and on Saturdays from 8 :00 a.m. to 5 :00 p.m. 

DEGREES 

Three advanced degrees, Master of Arts, Master of Science, and 
Doctor of Philosophy, are conferred by the University. 

Master of Arts. The degree of Master of Arts may be con- 
ferred upon Bachelors of Arts of this University, or of any other 
institution of equivalent standing, or upon Bachelors of Science 
provided this degree is an alternative equivalent of the A.B. degree, 
following a residence at the University of a minimum of three 
terms and the completion of a minimum of forty-five hours of 
University credit. 

Credits, earned in excess of those required for the A.B., or the 
US., degrees, before the degree is conferred or a certificate of the 
completion of the work for the degree is issued, are not counted 
Suward the A.M. degree, without special action of the Graduate 
Council before the work is done. 

Thirty of the total of forty-five hours required for the A.M. 
degree must be in one department, or in closely allied departments. 
Fifteen hours must be distinctly graduate in character. There is 
no restriction as to the amount of work that may be carried during 
any term. 

Graduates of this University may be given leave of absence for 
one term of the required year to pursue a specifie investigation. 

The work for the A.M. degree may all be done in Summer terms, 



12 INDIANA CJNIVJEKSITY 

or half-terms, provided that not more than four half-terms be so 
counted and that the work for the degree be completed within five 
years. 

Professional studies are not accepted for the graduate degrees, 
but research work on professional subects may be accepted for 
these degrees at the option of the professor in charge of the major 
subject, 

A thesis is required in all departments. 

Freshmen courses shall not be counted on advanced degrees. 

The first fifteen hours in beginning French and German, do 
not count on advanced degrees except by permission of the Grad- 
uate Council, on the written recommendation of the professor in 
charge of the major subject. The Council shall in such cases fix the 
amount of credit to be given. The amount of credit that a student 
may receive for elementary courses in other subects is determined 
by the professor in charge of the major subject. 

It is strongly urged that all students gain some proficiency in 
foreign modern language before entering the Graduate School. 
Credit in fifteen hours in modern foreign language, or the certified 
equivalent, is required of candidates for the A.M. degree. If the 
candidate does not meet this requirement before entering the 
Graduate School, he must obtain credit for fifteen hours of foreign 
language in addition to the regular forty-five hours required for 
the A.M. degree, unless by special act of the Graduate Council, par- 
tial credit is allowed for this work in accordance with the pro- 
visions noted in the preceding paragraph. 

Master of Science. The degree of Master of 'Science may be 
conferred upon Bachelors of Science of Indiana University under 
the same conditions upon which the degree of Master of Arts is 
con leered on Bachelors of Arts. 

Doctor of Philosophy. The degree of Doctor of Philosophy 
may be conferred upon graduates of this University, or of any 
institution of similar character and rank, upon the completion of 
an advanced cm use of study of not less than three years. 

Each candidate for this degree will select a major subject con- 
sisting of Hie work of some one department or recognized sub- 
division of a department; and not less than two minors, at least 
one of which m ns! he in some department related to, but distinct 
from that of the major subject. 

The course for tin; degree will he pursued under the direction of 
;i committee consisting of the heads of the departments in which 
lie- work is done, lis value will he determined by a final cxamina- 



GRADUATE school 13 

lion, and by the presentation of a satisfactory thesis. The thesis 
should usually embody original work 14)011 some prescribed, or 
accepted, subject; it must always give evidence that the candidate 
is capable of forming an independent judgment upon the recent 
literature of his department. 

A detailed statement of the work offered for the degree, in- 
dorsed by the professor in charge of the major subject, must be 
submitted to the Council of the Graduate School, not later than 
.May 10 of the year in which the candidate presents himself for 
examination. 

On the recommendation of the professor in charge of the major 
subject, and with the concurrence of the Council of the Graduate 
School, part of the three years' study required for this degree may 
be spent in residence at other universities. 

The thesis of every candidate for the degree of Doctor of Phi- 
losophy shall be presented to the Council of the Graduate School on 
or before the first clay of June of the year in which he is a candidate 
for the degree. The thesis must be indorsed by the head of the 
department as being in its final form, and ready for the press. If 
the candidate is recommended for the degree, arrangements must 
be made to deposit five printed copies of the thesis in the library. 

Examinations of each candidate for this degree will be con- 
ducted by a committee consisting of all the instructors under whom 
graduate work has been taken, in the presence of such members of 
the Faculty of the School as care to attend. 

At least one year before the final examination the candidate 
shall satisfy the professor in charge of the major subject of his 
ability to use French and German for purposes of investigation. 

Application for Degrees, Application for advanced degrees 
must be filed with the Dean at the time of admission to the Gradu- 
ate School. Application for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy 
must be on file at least one year before the candidate is admitted 
to the examination. 

FELLOWSHIPS 

Teaching Fellowships. A number of teaching fellowships are 
available for graduate students. 

A Teaching Fellow is relieved from all term fees, and the fellow- 
ship carries with it an honorarium of between $200 and $500 an- 
nually. The highest amount will ordinarily be paid only if the 
incumbent is appointed for a third year. A Teaching Fellowship is 
primarily a recognition of scholarship. A portion of his time will 
3—793 



14 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

be required in the service of the department in which he is ap- 
pointed; but not less than two-thirds of each Fellow's time must 
be devoted to work leading to the Doctorate in Philosophy. 

Appointments are for one year, and do not necessarily imply a 
reappointment. 

Lawrence Fellowship in Astronomy. The Lawrence Fellow- 
ship of the Department of Mechanics and Astronomy has been 
established by Mr. Percival Lowell, of the Lowell Observatory, 
upon the following terms and conditions : 

1. The fellowship shall be known as the Lawrence Fellowship, in 
remembrance of the donor's mother, and is established in perpetuity, re- 
vocable, however, at any time at the will of the founder. 

2. It shall be annually available and shall cover the college calendar 
year, that is, from commencement to commencement of the same. 

3. The applicant shall be appointed by the Department, the donor 
reserving the right of finally passing upon the suitability of the candidate 
so presented. 

4. The Fellow shall be given time and opportunity for an original 
thesis on some astronomical subject looking to the taking of a Master's 
degree, the nature of which shall be decided by the Director and the Fel- 
low. But the Fellow shall be expected to give general assistance in the 
work of the observatory during the period of his fellowship. 

5. The Fellowship will pay $600 and the Fellow's traveling expenses 
to and from the Observatory at Flagstaff, Ariz.; and a furnished room at 
the Observatory, shall be free to the Fellow's use. 

Fellowships for Graduates of Other Indiana Colleges. The 

Trustees of Indiana University, at their March meeting, 1910, 
established ten Graduate Fellowships of an annual value of $200 
each, with exemption from term fees, to be held by graduates of 
other colleges in the State. In awarding these fellowships the 
policy will be to assign them to the most promising students, irre- 
spective of the special field of study in which they wish to work, or 
the particular- institutions, from which they come. As between 
cases of equal merit, however, attention will be given to securing a 
distribution of the awards among different departments of study 
and different colleges of the State. 

Applicants for these fellowships should file a statement of their 
educational history and of their plans with the Dean of the Gradu- 
ate School. They should indicate in this statement the major sub- 
ject which they wish to pursue, and give a transcript of their 
college record. They should also present at this time recommenda- 
tions from their instructors, and such other evidences of their 
fitness as they '-an offer. Applications will be received up to April 
1 of each year. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 15 

Applications will be referred in each case to the department 
concerned for a decision upon the respective merits of the appli- 
cants in that department. On the basis of the departmental reports, 
the Graduate Council will recommend to the Trustees the most 
eligible candidate for appointment. 

These fellowships are not open to students doing professional 
work in Law or in Medicine. 

• Incumbents will not ordinarily be eligible for reappointment, 
but. they will be eligible for appointment to teaching fellowships. 

For application blanks, and further information, address the 
Dean of the Graduate School. 

Research Fellowships. There are, besides the fellowships men- 
tioned above, research fellowships, which are awarded to students 
who have shown marked ability and who desire to investigate 
definite problems in which they are interested. Each case is de- 
cided on its merits. The compensation, ranging from $300 to $500, 
is fixed by the Board of Trustees, on the recommendation of the 
Graduate Council. 

Special Rules Concerning Fellows. Holders of fellowships are 
required to render some service to the University and are not per- 
mitted, without the special permission of the Graduate Council, to 
do work for remuneration. 

UNIVERSITY ORGANIZATIONS 

The Graduate Club. The Graduate Club was founded in 1910 
to establish closer relations among the graduate students, and be- 
tween graduate students and the members of the Faculty. Through 
closer association and acquaintanceship, the club aims to foster 
solidarity of interest. The meetings are in part social, and in part 
devoted to the presentation of papers by the members of the club, 
giving the results of some investigation carried on by the author. In 
this way students in the different departments are made acquainted 
with the work in various lines of research carried on in the Univer- 
sity. Occasionally addresses are given by visitors of prominence. 
Membership in the club is open to all Graduates. 

Sigma Xi. K Sigma Xi is an organization especially for scien- 
tific students. It is a chapter of a national scientific fraternity, to 
which members of the Faculty, Graduates, and Seniors may be 
elected. Its object is to encourage investigation in science, pure 
and applied. 



16 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

Phi Beta Kappa. Phi Beta Kappa is a chapter of the oldest 
Greek-letter fraternity, founded in 1776 for 'the promotion of 
scholarship and friendship among students and graduates of Amer- 
ican colleges.' It is today no longer a secret society, but an honor 
society, having' for its special aim the encouragement of liberal 
culture. At Indiana University, a certain number of Seniors, not 
over ten per cent, are elected each year, partly at Thanksgiving and 
partly at Commencement. The membership includes also certain 
members of the Faculty, and a few other chosen directly from the 
ranks of the alumni. The chapter was established on Foundation 
Day, 1911. 

Departmental Clubs. The following departments have special 
departmental clubs: Geology, Zoology, Physics, Chemistry, His- 
tory. Philosophy, English, Mathematics, German, French, Spanish, 
and Comparative Philology. Membership in these clubs is open to 
faculty members of the department, Graduates, and undergradu- 
ates. The purpose of the clubs is to discuss topics of interest to 
members, and to promote social intercourse. 



Departments and Graduate Courses of 
Instruction, 1913-14 



«** In the following list are included many courses which arc open alike to Graduates and ad- 
vanced underclassmen. Only a skeleton announcement of these is here made; for full description 
see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or undor that heading in the University cata- 
logue. Strict ly graduate courses arc described in full. The more elementary courses are not listed 

here at all. 



DEPARTMENT OF GREEK 

Horace A. Hoffman, Professor. 
Frank W. Tilde n. Associate Professor. 

The time that may be at present profitably devoted to gradu- 
ate work in Greek is one year, leading to the degree of A.M. A 
thesis on some subject connected Avith the seminary work of the 
year is required for the degree. 

All candidates for A.M., with Greek as major subject are rec- 
ommended to take at least fifteen hours in Latin, in advance of the 
Latin taken in the undergraduate study. 

Courses 9, 12, and 13, or any part of these courses, are also open 
as minors to Graduates who have not already had as part of their 
undergraduate study the work which they take in their courses for 
graduate credit. 

The Department is well equipped for doing satisfactory work 
leading to the degree of Master of Arts. Besides the most impor- 
tant reference books, cyclopedias, dictionaries, lexicons, indexes, 
and standard editions of Greek writers, an effort has been made to 
build up an especially good collection of works treating of Euri- 
pides, since seminary work is generally given in that author. The 
Department has the chief older editions as well as nearly all of the 
later ones, and many special works bearing on Euripides. 

The Library contains the most important classical journals, 
among them complete sets of ^ The American Journal of Philol- 
ogy;' 'The American Journal of Archaeology;' 'The Classical Re- 
view;' Chicago, Cornell, and Harvard 'Studies;' 'Hermes;' 
'Jahrbiicher fur classische Philologie;' 'Mitteilungen d. Deutsch. 
arch. Inst, in Athen;' 'Philologus ;' 'Rheinisches Museum;' 'Jour- 
nal of Hellenic Studies.' 

Among the most valuable works in the field of archaeology and 

(17) 



JO INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

art the following may be named: 'Antike Denkmaler;' 'Ausgra- 
bungen von Olympia;' 'Carapanos;' 'Dodona;' Hamdey-Bey and 
Keinach's 'Necropole a Sidon:' Homolle's 'Fouilles de Delphes;' 
Ohnefalsch-Richter's 'Cypros, die Bibel und Homer;' Overbeck's 
'Griechische Kunstmythologie;' Stackelberg's 'Die Graber der 
Hellenen;' Fenger's 'Dorische Polychromie : ' Hawe's 'Gournia:' 
Penrose's 'Principles of Athenian Architecture;' and the publica- 
tions of the American and British Schools of Athens, and of the 
Egyptian Exploration Fund. Among the works on inscriptions 
and epigraphy the following may be mentioned: 'Corpus inscrip- 
tionum Graecarum;' 'Corpus Inscriptionum Atticarum;' 'Inscr. 
Graec. Septentrionalis, Italiae, Pelopon., Insularum, etc.,' 'Die 
lnschriften von Priene, ' Die Inschriften von Pergamon, and the 
important writings of such authorities as Klein, Kretschmer, Meis- 
terhans, etc. For palaeography and the study of the papyri, the 
following are accessible: Grenfell, Hunt, Kenyon, Mahaffy, May- 
ser, Mitteis, Thompson, and Wilkin. In the important field of vase- 
painting, the Library contains many valuable works. Among the 
most noteworthy are: Benndorf's 'Griechische und Sisilische Vas- 
enbilder;' Collignon and Eayet's 'Historie de la Ceramique grec- 
que;' Dechelette's 'Les Vases ceramiques ornes de la Gaule ro- 
maine;' Furtwangler and Loeschke's 'Mykenische Vasen', and 
'Mykenische Thongef asse ; ' Furtwangler and Reichhold's "Griech- 
ische Vasenmalerei ; ' Harrison and McColl's 'Types of Greek 
Vases', and various books by Gardner, Huddilston, Klein, Kretsch- 
mer, Murray, Smith, and Walters. 

The Department also owns upwards of 900 photographs of land- 
scapes, buildings, and works of art in Greece, Italy, and Sicily; 
and has many lantern-slides, busts, casts, a model of the Acroplis 
at Athens, and a series of reproductions of the famous Tanagra 
Figurines. 

Following are the courses open to Graduates in the Department. 
The more elementary courses are not here listed; for these see the 
bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under that heading in 
1 lie University catalogue: 

0. Lyric and Dramatic Poetry. Associate Professor TIlden. 
Fall, Winter, mid Spring terms, daily, at 0:00. 
Not given in 1914-15. 

12. Philosophical Prose. Professor Hoffman. 

Pall, Wilder, and Spring tonus, T. Tli., al 10:00. 

13. Historical and Rhetorical Prose. Associate Professor Tilden. 

Fall, Wilder, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 10:00, or, at hours to 
be appointed. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 19 

L5a. Graduate Seminary. Euripides is the author usually studied, but 
other authors may be selected, in 1912-13 Plato's Republic was 

the work studied. Professor Hoffman. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms. Th.. at hours to be appointed. 
156. Graduate Seminary: In 1912-13 Ideal Forms of Government were 
studied from Plato to modern times. Associate Professor Tilden. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, F., at hours to he appointed. 



DEPARTMENT OF LATIN 

Lillian G. Berry, Associate Professor. 

The work of the Department leading to investigation lies in the 
fields of Latin Literature, Roman Institutions, Epigraphy, Textual 
Criticism, Latin Syntax, and the Topography and Monuments of 
Ancient Home. In addition to the promotion of pure scholarship, 
the work is intended to meet the needs of those making the teaching 
of Latin in high schools and colleges their profession, whether or 
not they are candidates for a degree, not by instruction in peda- 
gogical methods, but by a deepening of their knowledge of and a 
quickening of their interest in Latin. 

Students entering upon the graduate study of Latin must pre- 
viously have completed the courses required of a Major in the 
Department, or their equivalent. Courses 28 and 32 will be re- 
quired of all students who are graduates of institutions which do 
not offer similar courses as a part of the undergraduate prepara- 
tion. If Courses 33 or 35, or both, have been taken in the under- 
graduate couses, Course 34 should be made a part of the graduate 
work, and vica versa. 

A continuous year of residence is advisable for profitable grad- 
uate work, but in special cases approved by the Department, the 
work for the A.M. degree may be done in three summers. 

Following are courses open to Graduates in the Department: 
The more elementary courses are not here listed; for these see the 
bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under that heading in 
the University catalogue. 

28. Paleography and Criticism. An introduction to the use of critical 
editions of Latin authors, in 1912-13 a special study was 
made of the first hook of Caesar's 'Gallic War.' This course is 
recommended to persons expecting to teach Latin, and will he 
required after this date of students admitted to the Third year 
with advanced standing from other colleges. Mr. Menk. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T., at 10:00. 

Johnston, 'Latin Manuscripts;' Meusel, 'Caesar;' Meusel (or Menge 
Preuss) 'Lexicon.' 



20 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

32. Epigraphy. The reading and interpretation of some five hundred 
Latin inscriptions ; a study of the Corpus [nscrrptionum through 
the investigation of special topics dealing with questions of 
Roman political institutions, public and private life, colloquial 
Latin, and historical Latin Grammar. Associate Professor 
Berry. 

Fall. Winter, and Spring terms. T.. at 9:00; 
[33. The Prose Writers of the Republic. Selections from Cato, Sallust. 
Cicero, and Ilirtius, with the critical study of tin 1 text of one of 
these authors so far as it is read in the class. 

Courses 33 and .".4 are given in alternate years. | 

Omitted in 1913-1914. 

34. The Poets of the Republic. Selections from Plautus, Terence, Lucre- 

tius, and Catullus, with the critical study of the text of some 
one of these authors so far as read in the class. Students are 
expected to he able to read German. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F.. at 9:00. 

35. Latin of the Empire. Selections from Tacitus, Suetonius, Juvenal, 

and Martial will be studied witli reference to their portrayal of 
political and social conditions under the Early Empire. Asso- 
ciate Professor Perry. 

41. Topography and Monuments of Ancient Rome. This suhject is studied 

from the sources, ancient and medieval: references in Greek 
and Latin literature, inscriptions, the Capitoline Plan, Regionary 
Catalogues, coins, reliefs, medieval itineraries, maps, and 
sketches. The information obtained from these sources is studied 
in the light of recent researches. Associate Professor Berry. 

Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, at an hour to he arranged. 

Platner, 'Ancient Rome.' 

Open to Graduates only. 

42. Readings in Latin Literature. The work in this course varies from 

year to year. It includes wide reading in authors of all periods, 
together with the first hand investigation of some problem con- 
nected with the line of reading being followed. In 1913-1914 a 
study has been made of the Latin Romance, its origin and his- 
tory : and characteristics as shown in Petronius and Apuleius. 
Associate Professor BERRY. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms. T., 2:00 to 3:50. 

open to Graduates only. 
I.:. Advanced Composition. This course is intended especially for teach- 
ers, hut may he taken by any persons who need practice in 
writing Latin. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, once a week, at an hour to he 
arranged. 

Open to Graduates and teachers of Latin. 
50. Seminary. The critical study of the text of some standard author, 
with Incidental investigation of problems in syntax, style, 
prosody, and so forth, in past years. Caesar, Sallnst, Tacitus, 
and Plautus have been made the subjects of similar work. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, \L. 2:00 to •"> :. r ,0. 

open to Graduates only. 



(ii; \l»l \ I'M SCHOOL 21 



DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES 

Albert F. Kuebsteiner, Professor of Romance Languages. 

Geobge I>. Morris, Associate Professor of French. 

Charles A. Mosemiller, Associate Professor of Romance Languages. 

The Departnienl of Romance Languages offers one year of 
graduate work, leading to the M.A. degree. 

The Library is well equipped with works in French criticism 
and with texts of the eighteenth century, and has a fair selection 
of other works of modern French literature. It contains, also, all 
of the volumes so far published by the 'Societe des anciens texts 
fraiirais.' and a good collection of French grammars and diction- 
aries. The following periodical publications are on file: 

Archiv fur das Stadium der neueren Sprachen und Literaturen. 

Bibliothek des litterarischen Vereins in Stuttgart. 

Euphorion. 

Frahzosische Studien. 

Germanisch-Romanische Monatsschrift. 

Literaturblatt fur germanische und roinanische Philologie. 

Modern Language Notes. 

Modern Language Review. 

Modern Philology. 

Publications of the Modern Language Association of America. 

Revue Bleuo. 

Revue de Cours et Conferences. 

Revue des deux Mondes. 

Revue des Langues Romanes. 

Revue de Paris. 

Revue de Philologie frangaise et de Literature. 

Romania. 

Zeitschrift fur franzosische Sprache und Litteratur. 

Zeitschrift fur romanische Philologie. 

Following are the courses open to Graduates in the Depart- 
ment. The more elementary courses are not here listed ; for these 
see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under that head- 
ing in the University catalogue : 

7. Seventeenth Century Poetry and Drama. Professor Kuersteiner. 
Fall. Winter, and Spring terms. M. W. F., at 0:00. 
[24. Eighteenth Century Poetry and Drama. Professor Kuersteiner. 
Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 9:06.] 
Omitted in 1914-15. 
L 10. Nineteenth Century: The Romantic Period. Associate Professor 
Morris. 
Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F.. at 10:00.] 
Omitted in 1914-15. 

4—703 



22 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

27. Nineteenth Century. The Realistic Period. Associate Professor 
Morris. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 10:00. 
Omitted in 1913-14. 
[32. Contemporary Fiction. Associate Professor Morris. 
Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 10:00. 
Omitted in 1914-15. 

33. Contemporary Drama. Associate Professor Morris. 
Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 10:00. 

2G. Advanced Composition. Associate Professor Mosemiller. 

Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 2 :00. 
13. Old French. Reading of texts ; study of Old French phonology and 
morphology ; exercises in tracing words from classical and from 
popular Latin to Modern French. Lectures. Associate Professor 
Mosemiller. 

Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 11 :00. 

Paris, 'Extraits de la Chanson de Roland;' Suchier, 'Aucassin et 
Nicolete' (French edition) ; Constans, 'Chrestomathie de l'ancien 
frangais;' Paris-Langlois, 'Chrestomathie du moyen-age;' Paris- 
Langlois, 'Extraits des chroniqueurs francais.' 

Open to students who have studied French and Latin. 

34. Vulgar Latin. Lectures on the phonology and morphology of Vulgar 

Latin ; relation to Classical Latin and to the Romance Lan- 
guages. Professor Kuersteijnter. 
Fall and Winter terms. T. Th., at 11 :00. 

DEPARTMENT OF GERMAN 

Bert J. Vos, Professor. 

Carl W. F. Osthaus, Professor. 

Eugene Leser. Assistant rrofessor. 

In combination with the Department of Comparative Philology, 
which gives courses in Gothic, Old High German, and Old Norse, 
the Department at present offers about thirty-five hours of graduate 
work. Students entering upon the graduate study of German must 
previously have completed the courses required for a major in the 
Department, or their equivalent. Courses 27 and 29 are, however, 
open to students of other departments than German upon the com- 
pletion of the work of the Junior year. The library is well equipped 
with books for the special study of Classical ami Nineteenth Cen- 
tury German literature. 

The list of complete sets of periodicals and of current publica- 
1 ions received includes the following, those marked with an asterisk 
representing complete sets : 

Alemannia. 

Allgemeine Zeitnng. Mtlnchen. 
•Archiv nir das Studiura der neuereri Sprachen und Literaturen. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 23 

An-liiv fiir Literaturgeschichte. 
♦Arkiv P6r aordisk Filologi. 

>Beitriige zur Geschichte der deutschen Sprache und Literatur. 
♦Bibliothek des literarischeii Vereins in Stuttgart 

i Jolumbia University Germanic studies. 

I ►.is Literarische EJcho. 
•Euphorion. 

♦Forschungen zur neueren Literaturgeschichte, herausgegeben von F. 
Muncker. 

German-American Annals. 
*Germanisch-Romanische Monatsschrift. 
♦Goethe-Jahrbuch. 
♦Indogermanische Forschungen. 

.Tahrbuch des freien deutschen Hoehstitts. 
*Jahrbuch der Grillparzer-Gesellschaft 

Jahrbuch des Vereins fiir niederdeutsche Sprachforschung. 
♦Jahresbericht liber die Erscheinungen auf dem Gebiete der Germaniselien 

Philologie. 
*Jahresberichte fiir neuere deutsche Literaturgeschichte. 
♦Journal of English and Germanic Philology. 

Korrespondenzblatt des Vereins fiir niederdeutsche Sprachforschung. 
♦Literaturblatt fiir genrianische und romanische Philologie, 
♦Modern Language Notes. 
♦Modern Language Review. 
♦ModerD Philology. 

♦Monatschefte fiir deutsche Sprache und Padagogik. 
♦Publications of the Modern Language Association of America. 
♦Quellen und Forschungen. 
"Revue germanique. 

♦VerSffentlichungen des Sehwabischen Schiller- Vereins. 
*Vierteljahrschrift fiir Literaturgeschichte. 

Zeitschrift des Allgemeinen deutschen Sprach vereins. 
♦Zeitschrift des Vereins fiir Volkskunde. 

Zeitschrift fiir Bticherfreunde. 
*Zeitschrift fiir deutsches Altertum. 

Zeitschrift fiir deutsche Mundarten. 
♦Zeitscrift fiir deutsche Philologie. 

Zeitschrift fiir den deutschen Unterricht. 
♦Zeitschrift fiir deutsche Wortforschung. 

Zeitschrift fiir die osterreichischen Gymnasien. 
"Zeitschrift fiir vergleichende Literaturgeschichte. 

For Gothic and Old High German, see Courses 4 and 9 of the 
Department of Comparative Philology. 

Following are the courses open to Graduates in the Department. 
The more elementary courses are not here listed ; for these see the 
bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under that heading in 
the University catalogue: 



24 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

14. German Usage. Assist nut Professor Leseb. 

Winter and Spring terms, T. Th., at an hour to be appointed. 
30. Studies in the recent German Drama. Professor Osthaus. 

Fall term, M. W. F., at an hour to be appointed. 
28. Journal Club. This course is introductory to the work of the Ger- 
man Seminary. Members make reports upon the contents of 
current numbers of journals devoted to German literature and 
philology, and are trained in the use of important, works of 
reference. Two to five hours' credit. Professor Vos. 
Fall term, two hours weekly, at an hour to he appointed. 
22. German Seminary: Goethe as a Lyric Poet. Conducted mainly in 
German. Two to five hours' credit. Professor Vos. 
Winter and Spring terms, two hours weekly, at an hour to he 

appointed. 
Open to students who have completed Course 28. 
27. Middle High German. Outline of the phonology, accidence, and 
syntax. Heading of selections from the lyric poets, the popular 
and court epic. Conducted in German. Professor Vos. 
Fall and Winter terms, two hours weekly, at an hour to he appointed. 
20. History of the German Language. The relation of German to other 
Germanic languages: the dialect divisions of Modern German; 
origins of the literary language; changes since the middle 
period; history of German orthography. Conducted in German. 
Professor Vos. 
Spring term, two hours weekly, at an hour to he appointed. 
Behaghel, 'Die deutsche Sprache' ('Das Wissen der Gegenwart,' 
Band 54). 



DEPARTMENT OF COMPARATIVE PHILOLOGY 

Gumo II. Stempel, Associate Professor. 
Course 8 will he given by Mr. Edgar A. Menk of the Department of Latin 

The graduate courses offered below will be extended as required. 
They may be supplemented by certain of the courses listed as un- 
dergraduate, as well as by certain courses given in the other Lan- 
guage departments and in History, Social Science (Descriptive 
Sociology), Philosophy, and English. The linn! that can profitably 
be speni here in graduate study in Philology is at present about 
two years. 

The collection of American, British, and German periodicals 
devoted to [ndo-European philology is practically complete. 

The more elementary courses of the Department are not here 
listed; for these see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or 
under thai heading in the University catalogue. 



GB LDUATE SCHOOL 25 

[5. Comparative Philology of the Classical Languages. An advanced 
course in the science of Language and Indo-European philology. 
Each student will emphasize the particular language in which 
he has had special training. Associate Professor Stempel. 

Pall, Winter, and Spring terms. M. W. F.-, at 10:00. 

Giles, 'Manual of Comparative Philology for Classical Students.' 

Open to students who have passed in Courses 2 and ,">, and in thirty 
hours of language, and to advanced students in Latin or Greek]. 

Omitted in 1914-15. 
[4. Gothic. Grammar and reading; phonology of the early Germanic 
languages. Associate Professor Stempel. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms. T. Th., at 10:00. 

Wright, 'Grammar of the Gothic Language;' Speitberg, 'Die gotische 
Bibel.' 

open to students who have passed in Course 2 and in thirty hours 
of language, and to others at 1he option of the instructor. 

Given every third year: see Courses !> and 10.1 

Not given in 1914-15. Given every third year, following Course 10: 
see Courses 9 and 10. 
8. Sanskrit. Grammar and reading; comparative phonology of the 
languages. Mr. Menk. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms. M. W. F., at 10:00. 

Perry, 'Sanskrit Primer' (or Lanman, 'Sanskrit Reader) : and Whit- 
ney. 'Sanskrit Grammar.' 

open to advanced students in Latin or Greek at the option of the 
instructor. 
[0. Old High German. Elements of the grammar, reading of selected 
texts, study of dialectal divergence. The method will be both 
comparative and historical. Associate Professor Stempel. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 10:00. 

Wright, 'Old High German Primer: - Braune, 'Althochdeutsche Grain- 
matik ;' Braune, 'Althochdeutsches Lesebuch.' 

Open to students on same conditions as Course 4.] 

Given every third year, following Course 4; see Courses 4 and 10. 

Not given in 1914-15. 
10. Middle High German. (1) Fall term: Elements of the grammar, 
reading of easy texts, and study of the development of the Ger- 
man language. (2) Winter and Spring terms: Nibelungenlied, 
with special study of the popular epic. 

Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th.. at 10:00. 

Wright, 'Middle High German Primer:' Paul. 'Mittelhochdeutsche 
Grammatik;' Robertson, 'L>er arnie Heinrich ;' Zarncke, 'Das 
Nibelungenlied.' 

Open to students on same conditions as Course 4. 

Given every third year, following Course 9; see Courses 4 and 9. 
[11. Old Xorse. Introduction to the language, and the reading of texts 
that throw light upon the popular literature of England and 
Germany. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 10:00. 



26 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

Sweet, 'Icelandic Primer;' Hensler, 'Alt islandisches Elemeutarbuch ;' 

selected texts. 
Open to students who have passed in fifteen hours of Germanic 

philology and to others at the option of the instructor.] 
Omitted in 1914-15. 
15. Seminary. Some topic in grammatical theory or the development of 

some English usage will he made the basis of study. Associate 

Professor Stempeu 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, W., 2:00 to 3:50. 

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

Will D. Howe, Professor. 

Charles J. Sembower, Professor. 

Henry T. Stephenson, Associate Professor. 

Frank Aydelotte, Associate Professor. 

Richard A. Rice, Assistant Professor. 

The Department is prepared to offer research work leading to 
the A.M. and Ph.D. degrees, in the following periods: Elizabethan 
literature, the literature of the Seventeenth Century, of the 
Eighteenth Century, and of the first half of the Nineteenth Century. 

The University library contains the chief Society publications ; 
for example, The Early English Text Society, Chaucer Society, 
Spenser Society, Shakspere (Old and New), Shakespeare Jahrbuch, 
Huth Library, Molone. Substantial additions are being made each 
year. Besides these publications, all the principal reviews and 
journals are received. 

For the degree of A.M., the candidate should have had in his 
undergraduate work the equivalent of forty-five hours of English, 
and should, in his graduate work, pursue a course restricted to 
three subjects, approved by the Department of English. 

For the degree of Ph.D., the candidate will be expected to do at 
least 1 wo full years' work in residence after the degree of A.M. He 
inusl be able to read German and French, and to do a piece of inde- 
pendent research which will be acceptable to the Department. 

The following courses are open to Graduates in the Depart- 
ment. The most elementary courses are not here listed; for these 
see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under that head- 
ing in the University catalogue. 

l<;. Shakspere. Associate Professor Stephenson. 

Pall, Winter, and Spring terms, two hours ,-i week. 
31. The Art of Poetry. Associate Professor Rice. 

Fall and Winter terms, three hours ;i week. 
:;::. Literary Criticism. Professor Howe. 

Pall, Winter, nnd Spring terms, two hours ;i week. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 27 

Seminary in Composition. Professor Semboweb. 
Hours and credit to be arranged. 
42. Chaucer. Associate Professor Avdki.ottk. 

Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, two hours a week. 
ii. The Age of Milton and the Age of Dryden (1025-1700). Professor 
Semboweb. 
Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, three hours a week. 
45. The Eighteenth Century (1700-1770). Assistant Professor Rice. 

Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, two hours a week. 
50. Contemporary Drama. Mr. Jenkins. 

Fall and Winter terms, two hours a week. 
[50. Research Course in Anglo-Saxon Literature. An investigation of 
sources and authorities; reading of Anglo-Saxon literature. 
Prerequisite, Comparative Philology 2. Five hours of credit 
may he secured in this course each term.] 
Ohitted in 1013-14. 
[51. Research Course in Middle English Literature. Reading of much 
prose, many romances, and some of the most important poems ; 
study of sources and relationship. It is expected that students 
who take this course will be able to read Middle English, Ger- 
man, and French. Five hours of credit may be secured in this 
course each term.] 
Omitted in 1913-14. 

52. Elizabethan Literature. Studies in the various forms of literature of 

the Elizabethan Age; investigation of sources and relationships. 
The work may deal either with individual authors or special 
literary forms. A reading knowledge of German and French is 
required. Five hours of credit may be secured in this course 
each term. Associate Professors Stephenson and Aydelotte. 

53. Seventeenth Century Literature. A research course in the literature 

from 1025-1700. Reading knowledge of German and French is 
required. Five hours of credit may be secured in this course 
each term. Professor Sembower, 

54. Eighteenth Century Literature. Studies in one of the fields of litera- 

ture — the poetry, the drama, the essay, or the novel. Reading 
knowledge of German and French is required. Five hours of 
credit may be secured in this course each term. Professor 
Howe and Assistant Professor Rice. 

55. Research Studies in the Literature of the Nineteenth Century. Dis- 

cussion of the various literary forms and study of the relation- 
ship between English and contemporary European literature. 
Reading knowledge of German and French is required. Five 
hours of credit may be secured in this course each term. Pro- 
fessors Howe and Sembower. 



28 INDIANA UNIVEBS1TY 



DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

James A. Woodburn, Professor of American History and Politics. 
Samuel B. Harding, Professor of European History. 
Amos S. Hershey, Professor of Political Science. 
Albert L. Kohlmeier, Instructor in History. 

The Department is prepared to offer research work leading to 
A.M. and Ph.D. degrees in the following fields: American Colonial 
History, the xlmerican Civil War and Reconstruction and the his- 
tory of American political parties. English History in the Seven- 
teenth and Nineteenth Centuries, the French Revolution, Diplo- 
matic History, Political Philosophy, International Law, and the 
History of Indiana during the Middle Period, 1820-1860. In each 
of these fields good library collections are already at hand, to which 
constant additions are being made. 

The following are among the periodicals and continuation sets 
at the disposal of advanced students of history and political science : 

American Historical Association, Annual Reports, 1884- 

American Historical Review, 1896- 

Anierican Journal of International Law, 1907- 

American Magazine of Civics, 1894-6. 

American Political Science Review. 1905- 

Annales des Sciences Politiques, 1899- 

Annals of the American Academy of Political Science. 1890- 

Annuaire Historique, 1819-50. 

Annual Register, 1791-1828. 

Archives Diplorriatiques, 1905- 

Camden Miscellany, 1847- 

Camden Society Publications, 1838- 

Columhia University Studies in History, Economics, and Public Law, 1891- 

DeBow's Review, 1846-68. 

English Historical Review. 1889- 

Historical Manuscripts Commission Reports (Great Britain), 1870- 

Gulf States Historical Magazine, 1902-04. 

Hansard's Parliamentary Debates. 1812-1897. 

Harvard Historical Studies. 1896- 

llistorische Zeitschrift, 1888- 

Lowa .Journal of History and Politics, 1903- 

Johns Hopkins University Studies in History and Political Science, 1883- 

Magazine of American History, 1880-93. 

Niles' Weekly Register, 1811-49. 

Political Science Quarterly, 1880- 

Da Revolution Franchise, 1899- 

Revue de Droll International el de Legislation Comparee, 1896- 

Revue Generate de Droit [nternatlonal el de Legislation Comparee, L896- 

Revue I [istorique, 1895- 



GBADUATE SCHOOL 29 

Revue Politique et Litteraire; Revue Bleue, 1880- 

RoyaJ Historical Society Transactions, 3d series, 1907- 

South Atlantic (Quarterly. 1903- 

University Of .Missouri Studies. 1901- 

University of Pennsylvania Publications: Series in Political Economy and 
Public Law. I.xso- 

1'iiivorsitY of Wisconsin Bulletin: Economics, Political Science, and His- 
tory series, 1894-99. 

Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, 1894- 

William and Mary College Quarterly Historical Magazine, 1902- 

Zeitscbrift fur Volkerrecbt und Pundesstaatscbrecbt, 1906- 

Gandidates for the degree Ph.D., with History as major subject, 
will be examined on each of the following fields: (1) Ancient His- 
tory, with emphasis at the option of the candidate in either Greek 
or Roman History; (2) Mediaeval and Modern History, with em- 
phasis in either the mediaeval or the modern field ; (3) English His- 
tory, with emphasis either on the period before 1485, or after that 
date; and (4) American History, with chief emphasis either on the 
period before 1783, or after that date. The examination on the 
special field of the thesis will naturally be more searching than 
elsewhere. 

Following are the courses open to Graduates in this Department. 
The more elementary courses are not here listed; for these see the 
bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under that heading in 
the University catalogue. 

8. American Colonial History to 17G0. Mr. Kohlmeier. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 8:00. 

18. American Parties and Party Leaders. Professor Woodrurn. 
Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 9:00. 
6. English History. Professor Harding. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 10:00. 

9. Renaissance and Reformation. Professor Harding. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 11 :00. 

10. History of Modern Europe, from about 1750 to the Present Time. 
Professor Hers hey. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 11 :00. 
22. American Diplomatic History. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 8:00. 
23a. Government and Parties of England. Professor Hershey. 

Fall term, M. W. F., at 11 :0O. 
23?>. Government and Parties of Continental Europe. Professor Hershey. 
Winter term, M. W. F., at 11:00. 
24. History of Political Ideas and Theory of the State. Professor 
Hershey. 
Spring term. M. W. F., at 11 :00. 



30 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

25. Public International Law. A course based upon tbe instructor's 
"Essentials in International Law,' with lectures, and the study 
of cases and illustrations drawn especially from the Russo- 
Japanese War. Professor Hershey. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 1 :00. 

13. France in the Middle Ages. A study of the institutions of mediaeval 
France, and of the processes whereby the feudal type of society 
was transformed into the modern state. Lectures, collateral 
reading, and reports on assigned topics. Professor Harding. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 10:00. 

16. Historical Method. The principles of historical investigation and 

criticism. A preparation for research in history. Professor 
Harding. 
Fall term, W., 3 :30 to 5:30. 

17. Historians and History Writing in the Nineteenth Century. A 

critical survey of modern historical literature, with special 
studies of selected German, French, English, and American 
writers. Professors Harding and Woodburn. 

Winter and Spring terms, W., 3 :30 to 5 :30. 
30. Western History, with Especial Reference to Indiana. A study of 
the political, economic, and cultural development of the Middle 
West. Dr. Esarey. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 8 :00. 
20a. Seminary in English History. Individual research work, under the 
guidance of the instructor, on some subject connected with 
modern English history. The results of the investigations arc 
presented from time to time as reports and are finally embodied 
in papers in form suitable for publication, of which a copy must 
be left with the Seminary. Professor Harding. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms. Hours for individual conference to 
be arranged. 
20c. Seminary in American Constitutional and Political History. Study 
of sources, reports of investigations, and thesis work. Professor 
Woodburn and Dr. Esarey. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M., 4:00 to 5:30. 
20d. Seminary in International Law and Diplomacy. Research work and 
the study of important topics, more especially of present day 
problems. During recent years such subjects were selected as 
the Alabama Claims, tbe Panama Affair, tbe causes of (be Russo- 
Japanese War, the 'Open Door' policy in China, and the genesis 
of the Monroe Doctrine. Professor Hershey. 

Pall. Winter, and Spring terms, at, hours to he appointed, 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 31 



DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS AND SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Ulysses (i. Weathkbly, Professor of Economics and Social Science. 
William A. Rawles, Professor of Political Economy. 
Frank <;. Bates, Associate Professor of Economies and Social Science. 
Prank T. Stockton, Assistant Professor of Economics and Social Science. 
John A. Lapp, Lecturer on Social Legislation. 

While the graduate work of the Department is primarily in- 
tended to cover one year and to lead to the Master's degree, it may 
in certain cases be extended to cover the requirements for the 
Doctor's degree. In the following special fields the courses of in- 
struction are ample and the research materials adequate: Eco- 
nomic History, Economic Theory, Money and Finance, Statistics 
and Statistical Method, Historical and Descriptive Sociology, So- 
ciological Theory, Social Technology, and Municipal Problems. 

The Department library is equipped with full sets of the most 
important public documents, both state and national, and has com- 
plete sets of most of the American, English, French, and German 
economic periodicals. Advanced students have direct access to 
these materials, and also to the special collections relating to char- 
itable and correctional institutions. The Department is affiliated 
with the Charity Organization Society of Indianapolis, with the 
Social Service Department of the School of Medicine, and with the 
Indiana Bureau of Legislative and Administrative Information. 
Through these agencies properly qualified students are enabled to 
come into direct contact with the social and economic problems of 
Indianapolis, and of the State. Constant use is also made of the 
statistical materials in the various departments of the State govern- 
ment. 

The more elementary courses of the Department are not here 
listed; for these see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or 
under that heading in the University catalogue. 

G. Money, Banking, and the Money Market. Assistant Professor 
Stockton. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 8:00. 
3. Public Finance. Assistant Professor Stockton. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F.. at 8:00. 
!>. Transportation. Professor Rawles. 

Spring term. M. W. F., at 9:00. 
5. Advanced Political Economy. Assistant Professor Stockton. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms. M. W. F., at 11 :0O. 
11. Municipal Problems. Associate Professor Pates. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms. T. Th., at 111 :00. 



32 INDIANA I'M VEBSITY 

31. Economic and Social Legislation. Associate Professor Bates and Mr. 
Lapp. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 11 :00. 
20a. Descriptive Sociology. The Basis of Society. Professor Weatheely. 

Fall term. T. Th., at 10:00. 
20/'. Descriptive Sociology: Social Evolution. Professor Weatheely. 

Winter term. Th., at 10:00. 
20c. Descriptive Sociology: Population. Professor Weatheely. 
Spring term. T. Th., at 10:00. 
4a. Social Pathology: Poverty and Charities. Professor Weatheely. 

Fall term. M. W. F.. at 10:00. 
47;. Social Pathology: Crime and Penology. Professor Weatheely. 

Winter term. M. W. F.. at 10:00. 
4c. Social Pathology: Special Problems. Professor Weatheely. 

Spring term. M. W. F., at 10:00. 
10. Socialism and Social Reform. Professor Weatheely. 

Fall term. T. Th., at 11 :00. 
la. General Sociology: Social Forces. Professor Weatherly. 

Winter term. T. Th., at 11 :00. 
lb. General Sociology: Social Efficiency. Professor Weatherly. 
Spring term. T. Th., at 11:00. 
8. Seminary in Economics and Sociology. Professors Weatherly and 
Ra-wles, Associate Professor Bates, and Mr. Lapp. 
Fall. Winter, and Spring terms. W.. 3:00 to 4:50. 
8a. Research. Professor Weatheely. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, at hours to be appointed. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY 

Ernest II. Lindley, Professor of Philosophy and Psychology. 
Waeneb Fite, Professor of Philosophy. 
William L. Pkyax, Lecturer on Ethics. 

Melvin JO. Haggebty, Associate Professor of Psychology, and Director of 
(lie Psychological Laboratory. 

Following are the courses open to Graduates in the Department. 
The more elementary courses are not here listed; for these see the 
hul let in of the College of Liberal Arts, or under that heading in 
I he I ' n i versify catalogue. 

'.'A. Psychological Seminary. Professor Lindley and Assistant Professor 
I [aggebty. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, two hours a week. 
:;... Modern rdealism. Professor Fite. 

Fall. Winter, and Spring terms. T. Th., at 10:00. 
[36. Advanced Logic and Methods of Science. Professor Fite. 

Fall and Winter terms, two hours once a week at a period to he 

arranged.] 
Omitted in 1912-13. 



GBADTJATE SCHOOL 33 

."». Advanced Psychology. Professor Linm.ky or Professor Fite. 
Fall, \\" i 1 1 1 <m*. ;iih! Spring terms, al hours to be arranged. 

7. Comparative Psychology. Assistant Professor Haggerty. 
Fall and Winter terms, M. W. P., at 11 :00. 

8. Psychological Research. Work arranged with individual students. 

Professor Lindley and Assistant Professor Haggebty. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, at hours to be arranged. 
30. Seminary in Applied Psychology. A survey of psychological princi- 
ples in relation chiefly to business enterprise and industrial proc- 
esses, and incidentally to various trades and professions. 
Professor Lindley and Assistant Professor Haggebty. 
Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, two hours a week. 

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

Schuyler C. Davisson, Professor. 
David A. Rothrock, Professor. 
Ulysses S. Hansta, Associate Professor. 
Robert D. Carmiciiael, Associate Professor. 
Kenneth I*. Williams, Instructor. 

The graduate courses at present offered by the Department lead 
to the A.M. and Ph.D. degrees. 

The library of the Department, consisting of about 2,300 bound 
\olumes, is located in Room 36, Wylie Hall. The library is open 
from 8 :00 a.m. to 10 :00 p.m., for use by students pursuing ad- 
vanced work in Mathematics. The collection of mathematical books 
consists of the more important English, French, and German texts 
and treatises, the collected works of Abel, Bernoulli, Cauchy, 
Cayley, Clifford, DeMorgan, Gauss, Jacobi, Lagrange, Lie, Mobius, 
Riemann, Schwartz, Smith, Steiner, and Weierstrass, together with 
the following sets of periodicals: 

Acta Mathematica. Stockholm. Berlin, Paris. 188.2 to date. 

Akademie der Wissenschaften, Sitzungsberi elite, Math. — Naturwiss, Klasse. 

Vienna. Current numbers. 
Akademie der Wissenschaften, Math. — Phys. Klasse. P»eiiin. Current 

numbers. 
Akademie van Wetenschappen. Yerhandelingen. Amsterdam. Current 

numbers. 
American Journal of Mathematics. P>altimore. 1878 to date. 
American Mathematical Monthly. Springfield, Mo. 1884 to date. 
Analyst (The). Des Moines, la. 1874-188.°,. Complete. 
Annali di Matematica. Milan. Current numbers. 
Annals of Mathematics. Charlottesville, Va., and Cambridge, Mass. 1884 

to date. 
Annales seientifiques de l'Ecole Normale Superieure. Paris. 1804 to date. 
Archiv der Mathematik nnd Physik. Leipzig. 1841 to date. 



34 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

Arehiv for Mathematik og Naturvidenskab. Ghristiania. Current numbers. 

Arkiv for Mateinatlk, Astronomi och Fysik. Stockholm. 1903 to date. 

Atti della Reale Accademia dei Lincei. Koine. Current numbers. 

Bibliotheca Mathematica. Leipzig. CuiTent numbers. 

Bulletin de la Soeiete mathematique de France. Paris. 1872 to date. 

Bulletin de la Soeiete physico-mathematique de Kasan. Kasan. Current 
numbers. 

Bulletin des Sciences matbematiques. Paris. 1870 to date. 

Bulletin of tbe American Mathematical Society. New York. 1804 to date. 

Bulletin of the New York Mathematical Society. New York. 1801-1894. 
Complete. 

Cambridge Mathematical Journal. Cambridge. 1837-1845. Complete. 

Cambridge and Dublin Mathematical Journal. Cambridge. 1846-1854, 
Complete. 

Educational Times (Mathematical Reprints from the). London. 18G3 to 
date. 

Giornale di Matematiche di Battaglini. Naples. Current numbers. 

II Bulletino di Matematico. Bologna. Current numbers. 

Jabrbucb fiber die Fortschritte der Mathematik. Berlin. 18G8 to date. 

Jahresbericht der deutschen Mathematiker-Vereinigung. Leipzig. 1802 to 
date. 

Journal de I'Ecole Polytechnique. Paris. 1705 to date. 

Journal de Matbematiques pures et appliquees (Liouville). Paris. 1830 
to date. 

Journal fur die reine und angewandte Mathematik (Crelle). Berlin. 182G 
to date. 

L'Education Mathematique. Paris. Current numbers. 

L'Enseignement Mathematique. Geneve. Current numbers. 

L'lnterinediaire des Mathematiciens. Paris. Current numbers. 

Mathematical Monthly (The). Cambridge Mass. 1850-1801. Complete. 

Mathematical Magazine. Washington. 1882-1884. 

Mathematical Gazette. London. 1890 to date. 

Mathematical Messenger (The). Ada, Louisiana. 1887-1804. 

Mathematical Review. Worcester. 1800-1807. Complete. 

Mathematica] Visitor. Erie, Pa. 1877-1883. Complete. 

Matheinatische Annalen. Leipzig. 1869 to date. 

Mathematische und naturwissenschaftliche Berichte aus Fngarn. Leipzig. 
Current numbers. 

Mathesis. Ghent 1881 to date. 

Messenger of Mathematics (The Oxford, Cambridge and Dublin). Cam- 
bridge. 1862-1871. Complete. 

Messenger of Mathematics (The). London and Cambridge. 1S72 to date. 

Mitteilungen <I<t Mathematischen Gesellschafl in Hamburg. Leipzig. Cur- 
rent, numbers. 

Monatschefte fiir Mathematik und Physic. Vienna. Current numbers. 

Municipal Journal of Engineering. New York. 1905 to date. 

Nachrichten von <lor KSniglichen Gesellschaft der Wissenschaften zu Got- 
tingen : Mathematisch-physikalische Klasse. Berlin. 187."> to date. 

Nouvelles Annales de Mathematiques. Paris. Current numbers. 

Nyt Tidsskrift for Matematik. Copenhagen. Current numbers. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 35 

Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society. Edinburgh. L883 to 
date. 

Proceedings of the Indiana Academy of Science, [ndianapolis. 1S91 to 
date. 

Proceedings o\' the London Mathematical Society. London. 1865 to date. 

Proceedings of the Mathematical-physical Society of Tokyo. Tokyo. Cur- 
rent numbers. 

Quarterly Journal ol Mathematics, Pure and Applied. London. 1857 to 
date. 

Rendiconti del Oircolo Matematico di Palermo. 1884 to date. 

Revista de la Sociedad Matematiea Espanola. Madrid. 1911 to date. 

Revue de Mathematiques Speciales. Paris. Current numbers. 

Revue Semestrielle des Publications mathematiques. Amsterdam. 1893 
to date. 

Sachsische Gesellsebaft der Wissenschaften. Berichte. Mathematisch- 
Physikalische Klasse. Leipzig. Current numbers. 

Science. New York and Lancaster. 1908 to date. 

Sitzungesberichte der Berliner matliematischen Gesellsebaft. Berlin. Cur- 
rent numbers. 

Transactions of the American Mathematical Society. New York. 1900 to 
date. 

Unterrichtsblatter fur Mathematik und Naturwissenschaften. Berlin. 
Current numbers. 

Zeitschrift fiir Mathematik und Physik. Leipzig. Current numbers. 

Zeitschrift fiir mathematisehen und naturwissenschaftlichen Unterricht. 
Leipzig. Current numbers. 



Graduate Courses 

Following are the courses open to Graduates in the Department, 
The more elementary courses are not here listed ; for these see the 
bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts. 

[21. Theory of Functions. Professor Davisson. 

Throughout the year, two hours a week.] 

Omitted in 1914-15. 
139. Theory of Groups of Substitutions. Associate Professor Hanna. 

Throughout the year, two hours a week.] 

Omitted in 1014-15. 
20. Mathematical Reading and Research. Professors Davisson "and 
Rotheock, Associate Professors Hanna and Cakmichakl. 

Hours and credits to be arranged. 
[20d. Difference Equations. Associate Professor Carmichael. 

Throughout the year, two hours a week.] 

Omitted in 1914-15. 
[30. Differential Geometry. Professor Rothrock. 

Throughout the year, three hours a week.] 

Omitted in 1914-15. 



36 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

[43. Bessel, Laplace, and Lames, Functions. Associate Professor 
Carmichael. 

Throughout the year, three hours a week. ] 

Omitted in 1914-15. 
[55. Ordinary Differential Equations. Associate Professor Carmichael. 

Throughout the year, three hours a week.] 

Omitted in 1914-15. 
23. Algebra of Qualities. Associate Professor IIanna. 

Throughout the year, three hours per week. 
25. Theory of Infinite Series. Associate Professor Carmichael. 

Throughout the year, three hours per week. 
31. Encyclopedia of Elementary Mathematics. Professor Pothrock. 

Fall and Winter terms, three hours per week. 
44. Non-Euclidean Geometry. Professor Davisson. 

Summer term, 1914. 
[56. Point Sets and Functions of a Peal Variable. Dr. Williams. 

Fall and Winter terms, two hours. 1 

Omitted in 1914-15. 
57. Mathematical Analysis. Associate Professor Carmichael. 

Throughout the year, three hours per week. 
20. Projective Geometry. Professor Davisson. 

Throughout the year, two hours per week. 
34. Higher Algebra. Dr. Williams. 

Summer term, 1914. 

Fall and Winter terms, three hours per week. 
20. Mathematical Reading and Research. Professors Davisson and 
Rothrock, Associate Professors IIanna and Carmichael and 

Dr. WlLLTAMK. 

Hours and credit lo be arranged. 

Courses 26, 31, and 44 may be taken by Graduates and under- 
graduates. 

DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICS AND ASTRONOMY 

Wilbur A. Cogshall, Associate Professor of Astronomy. 

Kirkwood Observatory, completed in 1900, is occupied by the 
Department. The building contains a library and computing room ; 
a lecture room ; dark room ; a transit- room, in which are a Bamberg 
universal instrument, a Howard sidereal clock, a mean time chron- 
ometer, and a chronograph; a dome twenty-six feet in diameter; 
and a room of tin; same size immediately below. In the dome is the 
refracting telescope, of which the 12-inch objective is by Brashear, 
and the mounting by Warner and Swasey, of Cleveland. The 
instrument lias a Focal length of about 15 feet, ami is supplied with 
eyepieces magnifying from 130 to nearly 1,000 diameters; also with 
polarizing helioscope, diagonal eyepiece, and an electrically ilium- 



GRADUATE SCHOOL $7 

mated micrometer; there are both coarse and fine circles in right 
ascension and declination, the fine circles having reading micros- 
cope and electrical illumination. 

The Department has in a separate building, a mounting, de- 
signed and built by the Department, that carries a 4-inch Browning 
refractor, a 5-inch portrait lens and an 8-inch parabolic mirror, for 
the photography of comets, nebulas, etc. 

For an account of the Lawrence Fellowship in Astronomy, see 
page 14. 

The Department receives telegraphic bulletins of discoveries 
made at American and European observatories. 

Following are the courses open to Graduates in the Department. 
The more elementary courses are not here listed; for these see the 
bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under that heading in 
the University catalogue. 

14. Orbits of Spectroscopic Binaries, Associate Professor Cogshall. 
Winter term. T. Th.. at 2 :00. 

8. Theoretical Mechanics. Mr. Dkew. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms. M. W. F., at 0:00. 

15. Celestial Mechanics. An introductory course. Mr. Drew. 
Spring- term. M. W. P.. at 11 :00. 

Open to* students who have passed in Course 7. 

12. Theoretical Astronomy. Integration of equations of motion ; compu- 

tation of orbits and ephemerides. Mr. Drew. 
Fall term. Hours and credits to be arranged with each student. 

13. Astronomical Research. A limited number of students will he per- 

mitted to undertake research work under the supervision of the 
Department. The equipment is best suited for work in astron- 
omy of precision and celestial photography. Associate Professor 
Cogshall and Mr. Drew. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms. Hours and credit arranged with 
each student. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS 

Arthur L. Foley, Professor. 

RoiXA If. Ramsey, Associate Professor. 

The graduate courses offered by the Department lead to the A.M. 
and Ph.D. degrees. 

The supply of apparatus for the presentation of courses in 
modern experimental physics is fairly complete. The equipment 
and facilities for work have been largely increased during the past 
few years, especially in the way of sensitive instruments and ad- 
vanced standards for advanced study and research. 



38 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

The library of the Department of Physics contains about eight 
hundred volumes, exclusive of sets of several journals. The follow- 
ing magazines are on file: 'Annalen der Physik,' 'Annales de 
Chimie et de Physique,' 'Beiblatter zu den Annalen der Physik,' 
' Physikalishe Zeitschrif t, ' 'The Electrical World and Engineer,' 
'The Electrician' (London), 'Journal de Physique,' 'The Philo- 
sophical Magazine, ' ' The Physical Review, ' ' The Proceedings of the 
Physical Society of London,' 'The Proceedings of the Royal Soci- 
ety,' 'LeRadium, ' 'Science Abstracts' (A and B), 'School Science 
and Mathematics,' 'Scientific American,' 'Scientific American Sup- 
plement,' and the publications of the Bureau of Standards and 
numerous academies and societies. Students have access also to 
the journals on file in the general library and in the libraries of 
other departments. Of these may be named : ' The American Jour- 
nal of Science,' 'The Astrophysical Journal,' 'The Engineering 
and Mining Journal,' 'The Engineering Magazine,' 'Nature,' 
'Comptes Rendus,' 'Science,' 'The Journal of Photography,' and 
' The Journal of Physical Chemistry. ' 

The courses comprising the work of the first three years (forty- 
five hours) in Physics will be found listed in the bulletin of the 
College of Liberal Arts, or in the University catalogue. The fol- 
lowing courses are open to Graduates, and to such undergraduates 
as may be prepared to take them: 

10. Applied Electricity and Dynamo Electric Machinery. Laboratory 
work. Associate Professor Ramsey. 
Fall and Winter terms, T. Th.. at 2 :00. 
20. Physical Methods and Manipulation of Physical Apparatus. Labora- 
tory Practice. Associate Professor Ramsey. 
Fall term. M. W. P., at 2:00. 
38. Electric Waves. Combined text and laboratory course. Assistant 
Professor Dutcher. 
Winter term, M. W. F., at 2:00. 
::<;. The Electron Theory. Associate Professor Ramsey. 

Spring term, T. Th., at 1 :00. 
.'IT. Conduction of Electricity through Cases, and Radio-activity. Com- 
bined text and laboratory course. Associate Professor Ramsey. 
Spring term, M. W. F., at 2:00. 

12. Physical Optics. Associate Professor RAMSEY. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 0:00. 

13. Advanced Mathematical Electricity. Associate Professor Ramsey. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 9:00. (Courses 12 and 13 

are given iii alternate years. ) 
22. Current Physical Literature. Professor Foley. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 10:00. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 39 

1G. Laboratory Practice in Spectroscopy and Photometry. Associate 
Pro lessor Ramsey. 
Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 2:00. 
14. Advanced Laboratory Methods and Research. Professor Folky. 

Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 8:00 to 12:00 and 1 :00 to 5:00. 
30. Advanced Theoretical Physics. A critical study of standard treatises 
and memoirs. Professor Foley. 
Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, two hours a week, at a time to he 
appointed. 

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

Robert E. Lyons, Professor. 

♦Louis S. Davis, Professor. 

Oliver W. Brown, Associate Professor. 

Frank C. Mathers, Associate Professor. 

Clarence E. May, Associate Professor. 

The Department of Chemistry has general, special, and private 
laboratories, a laboratory room, a lecture room, balance room, an 
incubator room, a stock room, museum, etc. Special laboratories 
are provided for electrochemistry, assaying and electric furnace 
work, organic, inorganic and physiological chemistry, water and 
gas analysis, spectroscopic analysis. The laboratories comprise 
eleven large, well-lighted rooms, equipped with workstands, capable 
of accommodating two hundred and seventy-five students. Each 
room is provided with fume hoods and air tight registers connected 
with a ventilating fan for the removal of offensive and poisonous 
gases. 

The general equipment for graduate work, including three re- 
search laboratories and library facilities, has been materially in- 
creased during the past year. 

Special attention is given to inorganic, organic, physiological, 
cind physical chemistry and to electrochemistry, technical analyti- 
cal chemistry, and electro-metallurgy. 

The graduate w r ork of the Department, leading to the degree 
A.M. and Ph.D., comprises advanced laboratory, lecture, library 
and seminary work in the lines indicated above, and special grad- 
uate courses described below. A thesis embodying original investi- 
gation is required for an advanced degree. 

The laboratories for advanced work and the departmental li- 
brary are open from 8 :00 a.m. to 5 :00 p.m. There are no classes in 
the laboratories; each student works independently. A five-hour 



*Absent on leave January 1 to September 1, 191<! 



40 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

laboratory course requires two and one-half actual hours of labora- 
tory work daily. 

Following are the courses open to Graduates in this Department. 
The more elementary courses are not here listed; for these see the 
bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under that heading in 
the University catalogue. 

ID* Physical Chemistry Laboratory work. Associate Professor Brown. 
22. Electrochemistry. Associate Professor Brown and Mr. Carlisle. 

Winter term. (.1) Lectures, T. Th., at 8:00. (B) Laboratory. M. 
W. F.. 1 :00 to 4 :50. 
28. Electrochemistry. Associate Professor Brown and Mr. Carlisle. 

Spring term. ( .1 ) Lectures, T. Th., at 8:00. (li) Laboratory, M. \Y. 
F. 1:00 to 4: o0. 
20. Storage Batteries. Lectures and laboratory work. Associate Pro 
lessor Brown. 
Fall term. 

13. Elementary Metallurgy and Assaying. Lectures and laboratory work. 

Associate Professor Brown and Mr. Carlisle, 
Fall term. Lectures, T. Th.. at 8:00: laboratory work, F. S., 8 :00 to 
11 :50. 
15. Advanced Technical and Engineering Analysis. Laboratory work. 
Associate Professor Mathers. 
Spring term, daily. 
32. (bis and Fuel Analysis. Lectures and laboratory work. Associate 
Professor Mathers. 
Winter term, three hours a week. 
::3. Spectrum Analysis and Sugar Analysis. Lectures and laboratory 
work. Associate Professor Mathers. 
Fall term, two hours a week. 
20. Chemical Engineering. Associate Professor Brown. 
Fall term. Lectures, M. W. F., at 8:00. 

14. Seminary. Reports on current literature and special topics. (1) 

Fall lerm: Inorganic Chemistry. Associate Professor Mathers. 
(2) Winter term: Organic Chemistry. Professor Lyons and 
Associate Professor May. (3) Spring term: Electrochemistry 
and Industrial Chemistry. Associate Professor Brown ami 
Associate Professor May. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, Th.. at 7:00 p.m. 
12". Research in Organic or Physiological Chemistry. Professor Lyons 
.Hid Associate Professor May. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 8:00 to .1:0(1. 
I l2/>. Research in the Chemistry of the Alkaloids. Professor Davis. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 8:00 to 5:00.] 
Omitted in 1!)1 1-15. 
12<". Research in Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry. Associate 
Professor Bboww. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 8:00 to .">:<»<>. 
I2d. Research in [norganic Chemistry. Associate Professor Mathers. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 8:00 to 5:00. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 4.1 

ISc. Advanced Physical Chemistry. Lectures on selected chapters of 
Physical Chemistry. Associate Professor Brown. 

Spring term. T. 'I'll.. :it :m hour to be appointed. 
lM. Advanced Electrochemistry and Electro-Metallurgy. (.1 > Lectures 
on the design and operation of commercial electric furnaces and 
on electric furnace processes and products. (B) Advanced labo- 
ratory work and research in pure and applied electrochemistry 
and electro-metallurgy, including investigations in electric fur- 
nace work, refining and extraction of metals, electro-synthesis 
of organic and inorganic compounds, manufacture of storage 
batteries, and of Industrial electrochemical processes. Associate 
Professor Bbown. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms. Laboratory work, daily, 8:00 to 
4:50; lectures, Winter term. F., at 8:00. 

Students in this course are recommended to take Physics 10 and 24. 
25. Advanced Organic Chemistry. A continuation of Course 0. (.1) 
Lectures and recitations on selected chapters of organic chemis- 
try. (B) Laboratory work or research in synthetic or analytical 
organic chemistry. Associate Professor May. 

(A) Winter and Spring terms, T. Th.. 11 :00. (B) Fall, Winter, 
and Spring terms, daily, 8:00 to 4:50. 

Cohen. 'Textbook of Organic Chemistry ;' Itoscoe and Schorlemer, 
•Treatise on Chemistry;' Ilanimersten. 'Physiological Chemistry;' 
Llensler-Pond, 'Terpenes.' 

Presupposes Courses G\ (>-. 7. 
31. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. Laboratory work. The preparation 
and study of the properties and reactions of the different com- 
pounds of the rare and uncommon elements, followed by research. 
This includes a review of the literature relating to the element 
that is being studied. Associate Professor Mathers. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., 8:00 to 4 :50. 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY 

Fdgar If. Cumings, Professor. 

Joshua W. Beede, Associate Professor. 

The work offered by the Department, leading to the Ph.D. de- 
gree, consists largely of research. Courses 10 and 13 are entirely 
of this nature. The problems offered for investigation are confined 
for the most part to stratigraphic geology and paleontology, al- 
though several studies in economic and geographic geology have 
also been published by members of the Department. 

In stratigraphic geology the subjects covered by the researches 
of the Department have been concerned chiefly with the Ordovician 
and Mississippian rocks of Indiana, and witli the Upper Carbon- 
iferous and Permian rocks of Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas. In 
pure paleontology, the Department is especially equipped for the 



42 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

study of problems in the development and morphology of Paleozoic 
Brachiopoda and Bryozoa. Considerable work has already been 
published in this field. 

For the prosecution of researches along the lines indicated 
above, the Department is adequately equipped. The collections 
of fossils are especially rich in material from the Ordovician, Silur- 
ian, and Mississippian of Indiana, and from the Upper Carbon- 
iferous and Permian of Kansas and Texas. The latter collections 
are among the best in America. A special feature of all these col- 
lections is the wealth of screenings containing immature stages of 
Brachiopoda, Bryozoa, and other fossils. 

The laboratory equipment contains the usual apparatus for the 
preparation of material, and machinery for cutting, grinding, and 
polishing thin sections of fossils. An enlarging and microphoto- 
graphic camera with special lighting appliances and combinations 
of lenses for a wide range of work, is available as an aid in the 
proper illustration of paleontological material. 

The Department receives the principal American and European 
periodicals dealing with geology, paleontology, and geography. 

Following are the courses open to Graduates in the Department. 
The more elementary courses are not here listed ; for these see the 
bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under that heading in the 
University catalogue. 

3. Economic Geology. A discussion of the non-metallic materials, such 
as clays, cement, coal, oil and gas, building stones, etc. Asso- 
ciate Professor Beede. 
Wilder term, daily, at 8:00. 
5. Systematic Paleontology. Laboratory study of fossil invertebrates. 
Dr. Galloway. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, two to live hours, at times to be 
arranged. 
r»/. Evolution. A study of the geologic factors in evolution; the origin 
of the oldest faunas; age of the earth, etc. Professor Comings. 
Wilder term, at an hour to be arranged. 
10. Research. Investigation of geological and paleontological problems. 
A careful report on each investigation is required, in proper form 
for publication. Professor Cumings and Associate Professor 
Beede. 
Pall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 9:00 to l :50. 
13. Advanced Field Work. Continuous work in the field for a month or 
more in the summer, fall, or spring. This course will usually 
form pari of the research work submitted for an advanced 
degree. The work in ust be largely Independent, but will always 
be under the general oversight of a member of the department. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 43 

[14. Stratigraphic Geology. A study of the literature of the various 
geologic systems. The history of their investigation, and the 
present knowledge of their divisions, distribution, faunas, and 
paleography will be fully considered. Professor Cumings. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring tonus. Lectures, T. Th., at 10:00.1 
Omitted in 191 1-1.".. 

DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY 

David M. Mottier, Professor. 

Frank M. Andrews, Associate Professor. 

James M. Van Hook, Assistant Professor. 

Graduate work leading to the degree of Master of Arts in 
Botany comprises special studies along some line indicated in the 
advanced courses enumerated below, or the investigation of some 
problem of a more limited scope. For the degree of Doctor of Phil- 
osophy, the subject of the thesis is selected from some line of morph- 
ology, cytology, physiology, or mycology. Space is provided for 
four students, and for the work undertaken the equipment is 
adequate. 

The departmental library contains the more necessary works of 
reference, and the principal botanical journals. 

Following are the courses open to Graduates in the Depart- 
ment. The more elementary courses are not here listed ; for these 
see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under that head- 
ing in the University catalogue. 

4. Morphology of Fungi. Assistant Professor Van Hook. 
Pall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 1 :00 to 3 :00. 

5. Physiology. Associate Professor Andrews. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily. 

0. Cytology. Professor Mottier. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily. 
5«. Research in Physiology. Special studies will be offered to those pur- 
suing work for advanced degrees. Associate Professor Andrews. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily. 
7. Research in Morphology and Cytology. Problems for special investi- 
gation in morphology and cytology will be assigned to students 
who are prepared to undertake original work. Professor 
Mottier. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily. 
13. Morphology of the Algae. A study of the life-history and of the 
development of vegetative and reproductive organs in certain 
algae. The work is confined very largely to fresh-water forms. 
Professor Mottier. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily. 
18. Investigations in Mycology and Plant Pathology. Assistant Professor 
Van Hook. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 1 :00 to 3 :00. 



44 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY 

Carl H. Eigenmann, Professor, and Director of the Biological Station. 
Fernandus Payne, Associate Professor. 
Wile Scott. Assistant Professor. 

Pull work leading to the degree Ph.D. is offered in Course 6. It 
is purely a research course, and offers the widest choice of subjects 
permitted by the equipment of the Department. 

The subjects selected have radiated from centers. One of several 
of these is the problem, or problems, of the freshwater fauna of 
tropical America. At present the Department is engaged in a study 
of divergent evolution as shown by the tropical American characin 
fishes, and in the distribution of the fishes of Western Colombia 
and Ecuador. 

The Department is well equipped for this work. The most im- 
portant of the zoological collections is the collection of fishes, com- 
prising many thousand specimens, Arrangements have been made 
for co-operation with various other institutions, by which the lar- 
gest aggregation in the world of collections of South America fresh- 
water fishes is available for the monographs in preparation. By 
special arrangement the collections of Harvard University, made 
by Professor L. Agassiz and his assistants during the Thayer ex- 
pedition, and by others, are available for the monograph on the 
American Characins. 

The Department has entered into close relations with the Car- 
negie Museum of Pittsburg. Under the direction of Dr. W. J. 
Holland, director' of this Museum, Mr. John Haseman, A.M., '07, 
(hiring 1907-1910, explored the coast rivers of Brazil, Uraguay, and 
Argentina, between the Rio San Francisco and Buenos Aires. He 
ascended the Rio Paraguay, crossed to the Guapore and descended 
thai river and the Rio Madeira to Manaos, on the Amazon, making 
collections on tin; way. 

Prom August to December, 1908, Professor Bigenmann, with 
Mr. S. B. Shideler as volunteer assistant, explored the Demerara, 
Kssequibo, and Potaro Rivers of British Guiana. Very extensive 
collections were made in the lowland, as well as above the Kaieteur, 
a vertical fall of 741 feel of the Potaro River. The results of the 
expedition have been published by the Carnegie Museum as reports 
of the British Guiana Expedition of [ndiana [Iniversity and the 
Carnegie Museum. The hind report on 'The Freshwater Fishes 
ol* British Guiana' was issued in August, 1912. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 45 

From January to April, 1912, Professor Eigenmann made col- 
led ions in the San Juan, Atrato, Dagua, Cauca, and Magdalena 
Rivers in ( Jolombia. 

During January to April of 1913 Mr. Charles Wilson and Mr. 
Arthur Ilenn explored the Patia River of Southwestern Colom- 
bia, and supplemented the work done the preceding year in 
the San Juan and Atrato Basins of Colombia. Their work 
was made possible by the generosity of Mr. Hugh McK. Landon 
and Mr. Carl G. Fisher of Indianapolis. Mr. Landon has gener- 
ously provided the means to enable Mr. Henn to extend the work 
into Ecuador. He was in the field till March, 1914. 

The second center of departmental interest has been, and is the 
subject of heredity, especially: (A) The history of the Sex Cells, 
(B) Variation, (C) The rate of ontogenic and phylogenic modifica- 
tion of the sense organs of Cave Animals, (D) Experimental 
Zoology. 

For the study of cave animals (C) the facilities of the Depart- 
ment are ideal. The University is located at the edge of the great 
cave region of the Mississippi valley. By act of the Legislature, the 
Donaldson estate near Mitchell, *Indiana, has been placed in the 
keeping of the trustees of Indiana University. On it are situated 
numerous sinkholes, dry caves, and an underground water-course at 
least two miles long. This underground river is rich in blind fishes 
and other blind aquatic animals. A small laboratory has been 
erected on the farm, and is in charge of a research fellow, appointed 
from year to year. In the study of cave animals the Department 
has in the past had the co-operation of the Carnegie Institution, the 
American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the 
Elizabeth Thompson Science Fund. 

For the study of variation (B) in non-migratory vetebrates in 
a 'unit of environment' this Department organized and has since 
maintained a fresh-water Biological Station. It is at present lo- 
cated on Winona Lake, Kosciusko County, Indiana, in the grounds 
of the Winona Assembly. The Station owns, as a gift of the Winona 
Assembly, two buildings, 20x45 feet, each two stories high. The 
buildings are on the lake front, at the mouth of Cherry Creek. The 
Station also owns boats, nets, sounding and temperature apparatus, 
glassware, etc. Microscopes and other needed apparatus are moved 
to the Station from the University. 

For the study of sex cells (A), and Experimental Zoology (D), 



*By a recent decision of the Supreme Court, the act placing the management of this land 
he hands of the trustees of Indiana University has been decided to be unconstitutional. 



46 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

the Department owns all the necessary apparatus and the surround- 
ings of the University offer an abundance of material. The Depart- 
ment also owns collections gathered in the vicinities of Jackson, 
Miss., Salt Lake City, Los Angeles, Tucson. El Paso, and San 
Antonio, by Professor Payne. 

A third line of work undertaken by the Department is the survey 
of Indiana Lakes. Hydrographic maps of the lakes are being made, 
the physical and chemical conditions determined, and the various 
biological phenomena analyzed. 

The field work for these investigations is done in the summer,, 
the Biological Station on Winona Lake being used as a base. The 
solution ponds in the region of the University are being utilized for 
comparative studies. 

Following are the courses open to Graduates in the Depart- 
ment. The more elementary courses are not here listed; for these 
see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts or under that heading 
in the University catalogue. 

3. Advanced Zoology. Professor Eigenmann and Assistant Professors 

Payne and Scott. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, five hours a week. 

4. General Biological Problems: (A) The development of the idea of 

evolution and Darwinism; (B) The laws of heredity. Profes- 
sor ElGENMANN. 

Spring term, daily, at 9 :00. 

5. Seminary. Weekly meetings of advanced students and instructors to 

discuss current literature and report on investigations in prog- 
ress. Professor Eigenmann and Associate Professor Payne. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M., at 4 :00. 

6. Research. Special investigation of zoological problems, with a report 

on each investigation. Branches in which subjects have in the 
past been selected and reported upon are Variation, Degenera- 
tion, Regeneration, Sense Organs, Embryology, Faunal and 
Systematic Studies of Fishes, Ecology of Cave and Freshwater 
Animals, Cell and Chromosome Studies. For a fuller state- 
ment, see the general statement of the Department. Professor 
Eigenmann, Associate Professor Payne, and Assistant Professor 
Scott. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, 8:00 to 4 :50. 

7. Biological Survey. A continuation of the previous work in the 

physical and biological features of Winona Lake and its environs. 
Professor Eigenmann, Assistant Professor Scott. 
Summer term, .-it the Biological Station. 



GB mm mi: SCHOOL 47 

DEPARTMENT OE ANATOMY 

Burton D. Myers. Professor. 

Following are the courses open to Graduates in the Department. 
The more elementary courses are not here listed; for these see the 
bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under that heading in 
the University catalogue. 

1:5. Research Work. Opportunity for research work is offered to ad- 
vanced students who may have at least one-half their time for 
one year free for the work. Professor Myers. 
Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, at hours to he appointed. 
lo. Advanced Course in Anatomy. Open to students who have completed 
the dissection of the human body, Course 8, and desire to do 
special or advanced work. Professor Myers. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, at hours to be appointed. 

PHYSIOLOGY 

William J. Moenkhaus, Professor. 
Clarence E. Edmonson, Instructor. 
Edward W. Koch, Instructor. 

Facilities for research leading to the higher degrees are avail- 
able within restricted lines in general physiology. 

Following are the courses open to Graduates in the Department. 
The more elementary courses are not here listed ; for these see the 
bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under that heading in 
the University catalogue. 

6. Advanced Physiology. Professor Moenkhaus and Mr. Edmonson. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, at hours to be arranged. 

10. Research. Problem work in certain phases of general physiology 

may be taken by those properly equipped. Professor 
Moenkhaus. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 8 :00 to 4 :50. 

11. Seminary. 

EDUCATION 

William W. Black, Professor and Dean. 

Elmer E. Jones, Professor. 

*W. F. Book, Professor. 

Hubert G. Childs, Associate Professor. 

Melvin E. Hagoerty, Associate Professor. 

Graduate work is offered in the School of Education, and special 
programs leading to the A.M. and Ph.D. degrees, with the Master's 

*Absent on leave. 



48 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

and Doctor's certificates of Education, will be arranged on appli- 
cation. 

A student whose undergraduate major was in another depart- 
ment will usually be given opportunity to do in one year the work 
for the A.M. degree in Education. The work will include such 
undergraduate courses in Education as may be necessary as a basis 
for graduate work. 

In the future, as in the past, the best work of students in the 
courses in research work will be published. 

Following are the courses open to Graduates in the School. 
The more elementary courses are not here listed; for these or for 
fuller statements of the courses below, see the bulletin of the 
School of Education, or under that heading in the University 
catalogue. 

C. History of Education. Professor Jones. 

Fail, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th.. at 8:00. 
II). Philosophy of Education. Professor Jones. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 8:00. 
15. School Administration. Associate Professor Guilds. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 10:00. 
16a. Educational Seminary. Professor Jones. 

Fall. Winter, and Spring terms. T.. at 7 :0O p.m. 
1 Ob. Educational Seminary. Elementary Education. Professor Black. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M., at 7:00 p.m. 

17. Advanced Educational Psychology. Associate Professor Haggerty. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms. M. W. F., at 10 :00. 

9. Orthogenics. Professor Jones. 

Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 3:00. 
11. Principles of Organization and Supervision. Professor Black. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms. T. Th.. at 10:00. 

18. Research in Education. 

a. The Problems of the Elementary School. Professor Black. 

b. The History and Philosophy of Education. Professor Jones. 

c. The Psychology of the Processes of Education. Associate Fro- 

fessor Haggerty. 

d. Secondary Education. Associate Professor Ciiildn. 

e. School Administration. Associate Professor Childs. 



Students Registered in the Graduate 
School, 1913-1914 



S, Summer term. F, Fall term. W, Winter term. Sp, Spring term. 

Abell, Jasper August Middletown, Ind. 

A. B.j Indiana University, 1910 Education S. 

Allen. William Ray Hartford City, Ind. 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. Zoology S. F. 

Andrews, Mrs. Marie Opperman Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1902, Indiana University; Botany S. F. W. 

A. M., 1903, Wellesley. 
Artman, Oliver Clarence Noblesville, Ind. 

A. B.. 1912, Indiana University. Sociology S. F. W. Sp. 

Atkinson, Airs. Zella Wiseman Salem, Ind. 

A. B., 1909, Indiana University; English S. 

A.M., 1912. 
Baker, Charles Wilford Marion, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, W'abash College. German S. 

Baldwin, Milton Howard Marion, Ind. 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. English F. W. Sp. 

Banta, Elizabeth Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. History F. W. Sp. 

Barr, Hugh Harlan Edwardsport, Ind. 

A. B., 1908, Indiana University. Education S. 

Bays, John Andrew Rockport, Ind. 

A. B., 1908, W'abash College. Education S. 

Benckart, Alargie Nold Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. English F. W. Sp. 

Bornwasser, Lulu Kirkpatrick Charleston, Ind. 

A. B., 1905, Indiana University. Mathematics. . . .S. 

Bourn, Frederick Edward Little Point, Ind. 

A. B., 1911, Indiana University. Education S. 

Brownfield, Lilian Beeson South Bend, Ind. 

A. B., 1895, De Pauw University; English S. F. W. Sp. 

A. M., 1904, Ohio Wesley an. 

Bruner, Jacob Franklin Lexington, Ky. 

B. S., Kentucky State University. S. 

Brunger, Emma Sullivan, Ind. 

A. B., 1911, Indiana University. Latin F. 

Buley, Roscoe Carlyle Vincennes, Ind. 

A. B., Indiana University, 1914. History Sp. 

Burke, Robert E Winsted, Conn. 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. Fine Arts F. W. Sp. 

Busenberg, Franklin Leslie Akron, Ind. 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. Education S. 

(49) 



50 rXDIANA UNIVERSITY 

Bybee, Halbert Pleasant Rochester, Ind. 

B. S., Rochester Normal School; Geology S. F. W. 

A. B., 1912; A.M., 1913, Indiana 
University. 
Carlisle, Paul Johnson Shelbyville, Ind. 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. Chemistry F. W. Sp. 

Carter, Susan Davies Indianapolis, Ind. 

A. B., 191 1, De Pauw University. English S. 

Carter, William Windom Plainville, Ind. 

A. B., 1906, Indiana University. Education S. 

Cauble, Christopher Columbus Salem, Ind. 

A. B., 1910, Indiana University. Education S. 

Cockrum, Barrett William Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1914, Indiana University. Chemistry 

Cox, James Emery Oakland City, Ind. 

A. B., 1911, Oakland City College; English 

A. M., 1913, Indiana University. 
Crampton, Charles Muncie, Ind. 

A. B., 1914, Indiana University. Philosophy. . . . 

Cravens, John William Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1897, Indiana University. Education 

Crennan, Charles Holloway Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. History 

Culp, Vernon Stanford Nappanee, Ind. 

A. B., Goshen College. German 

Cumins, Roy Ingalls, Ind. 

A. B., 1909; A.M., 1910, Wabash College. Mathematics. . . 
Davis, Elizabeth Louise Jeffersonville, Ind. 

A. B., 1910, Indiana University. Latin S. Sp. 

Dame, Mary Ruth Connersville, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Franklin College. English S. 

Deam, Thomas Marion Bluffton, Ind. 

A. B., 1908, Indiana University. Education F. 

Demaree, Elizabeth Lucile Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1906, Indiana University. English S. 

Du Bois, Henry Mathusalem Wagoner, Ind. 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. Geology. . F. W. Sp. 

Dutcher, John Benjamin Decatur, Ind. 

A. B., 1906, Indiana University; Physics F. 

A.M., 1907, Indiana University. 
Easley, Katherine New Albany, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University; English W. Sp. 

A. M., 1913, Indiana University. 
Edmondson, Mrs. Edna Batfield Bloomington, Ind. 

A. IV, 1911, Indiana University. Economics F. W. Sp. 

Edwards, Elmer Horace lasonville, Ind. 

A. B., 1911, Indiana University. Education S. Sp. 

Erbes, Clara Centralia, 111. 

A. IV, University of Illinois, 1909. German Sp. 

Evans, Mrs. .Agnes Tobin Bloomington, Ind. 

A. IV. 1903. Indiana University. English W. 



w 


Sp. 


F. 


W. Sp. 


.W 


Sp. 


w 


Sp. 


F. 


W. Sp. 


F. 


W. Sp. 


.S. 


F. W. Sp 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 51 

Evans, Beatrice Clementine Bloomington, [nd. 

A. B., 1910; [ndiana University; W. Sp. 

A.M., 1911, Indiana University. 

Fall, Crystal Brent on Indianapolis, Ind. 

A. B., 1914, Indiana University. Chemistry Sp. 

Fewell, Charles T Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1914, Indiana University. Education Sp. 

Fisher, John Goshen, Ind. 

A. B., Goshen College, 1913. Philosophy F. W. Sp. 

Foote, Helen Christine Vincennes, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. English S. 

Gilmer, Harold Wright Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., Monmouth College, 1904. Greek Sp. 

Gregory, Chester Arthur Jonesboro, Ind. 

A. B., 1908, Indiana University. Education S. 

Gregory, Mabel Hanna Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. 
Hall, Jessie Geneva Gaston, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. English S. 

Hanna, Thomas H., Jr Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., Monmouth College, 1893. Economics F. W. Sp. 

Hansford, Hazel Irene Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. English W. 

Hawkins, Aubrey Leslie Kokomo, Ind. 

A. B., 1909, Indiana University; English S. 

A.M., 1911, Indiana University. 
Hennel, Edith Amelia Evansville, Ind. 

A. B., 1911, Indiana University. Botany F. W. Sp. 

A.M., 1912, Indiana University; 
Henry, Edna Gertrude Indianapolis, Ind. 

A. B., 1897, Indiana University. Economics W. 

Hinkins, Virginia Chicago, 111. 

Ph. B., 1913,University of Chicago. F. 

Hisey, Walter Edwin Corydon, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. S. 

Hitchcock, Wiley Elnora, Ind. 

A. B., 1909, Indiana State Normal. S. 

Hoch, August Hermes Rockport, Ind. 

A. B., 1911, Indiana University. History S. 

Hoffer, George Nissley W. Lafayette, Ind. 

A. B., 1909, Lebanon Valley College; S. 

M. S., 1911, Purdue University. 
Hogan, Mary Alice Kewanna, Ind. 

A. B., 1909, Indiana University. Latin S. 

Hogate, Jessie May Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1899, Allegheny College. History S. 

Holiman, Willis Newton Delaware, Ind. 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. Education S. 

Hoover, Lewis R Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1913. Indiana University. Education F. W. Sp. 



52 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

Horner, Alary Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1905, Indiana University; S. 

A.M., 1908, Indiana University. 
Hornnng, Howard Vincent Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., Indiana University, 1914. Political Science. Sp. 

Houseman, Harley Vernon. Hartford City, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. Chemistry S. F. W. Sp. 

Hufford, Mason Edward Rossville, Ind. 

A. B., 1911, Indiana University; Physics F. W. Sp. 

A.M., 1912, Indiana University. 
Hyslop, George Hall New York City. 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. Philosophy F. W. Sp. 

Jackson, Thomas Franklin Calvertville, Ind. 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. Geology S. F. W. 

Jones, Altha Belle Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. English F. 

Kamman, William Frederick Dale, Ind. 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. German S. F. W. 

Kincaid, Martha May Indianapolis, Ind. 

A. B., Butler College, 1913. French . . . Sp. 

Knight, Jesse Dudley Bedford, Ind. 

A. B., 1908, Indiana University. Education S. 

Kunschik, Paul Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., Indiana University, 1914. German Sp. 

Lansing, Alice Vance Richmond, Ind. 

A. B., Indiana University, 1911. English Sp. 

Latzke, Frances Renshaw New York City. 

A.B., 1912, Barnard College, Columbia Romance Lang. . .F. W. Sp.. 
University. 
Lewis, Fred Daniel Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. Education S. F. W. Sp. 

McCain, Gertrude Iona Delphi, Ind. 

A. B., 1909, Indiana University; Mathematics W. Sp. 

A.M., 1911, Indiana University. 
McCartney, Fred Morton Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University; Philosophy W. Sp. 

A.M., 1913, Indiana University. 
McClintock, Lyman Johnston Anderson, Ind. 

A. B., 1909, Indiana University. Latin S. 

McCloskey, Mary Magdalene Bloomington, Ind. 



A. B., L912, Indiana University; English 

A.M., 1913, Indiana University. 
McElhinney, Robert Stewart Bloomington, Ind 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. English 

McEwan, Mrs. Eula Davis Earl Park, Ind. 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. Geology 

McKinncy, Asa Kemplon, Ind. 

A. \'>., Indiana University, 1911. Chemistry.... 
Mance, Grover Cleveland Pine Bush, N. Y. 

B. S., 1906, Colgate University. Geology 



V. W. Sp. 

s. 

F. W. Sp. 

Sp. 

S. F. W. Sp 



GRADUATE school 53 

Marl/, India l.avina Kokomo, Ind. 

A. B.. 1900, Butler College. German S. 

Mason. Thomas Edward Blooming"! on, Ind. 

A. B., 1905, Indiana University; Mathematics. . . . F. W. Sp. 

A. M., 1912, Indiana University. 
Maxwell, Ruth Redfern Indianapolis, Ind. 

A. B., 1907, Indiana University. Romance Lang. . .F. W. 

Meyer, Lee Albert Shelbyville, Ind. 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. English S. 

Miller, Ruth Esther Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1911, Indiana University. English F. 

Mills, Clifford Franklin, Ind. 

B. S., 1910, Franklin College. Mathematics F. W. 

Montgomery, Emery Watkins Mount Vernon, Ind. 

A*. B., 1909, Indiana University. History S. 

Mortland, Maizie Montezuma, Iowa. 

A. B., 1908, Iowa University. English F. 

Mourer, Harry Hartley Idaville, Ind. 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. History W. 

Murphy, Maurice Elzin Trinity Springs, Ind. 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. History S. 

Myers, Fred I Decatur, Ind. 

A. B., Indiana University, 1914. English Sp. 

Nay, Bavis Clay Mt. Summit, Ind. 

A. B., 1910, Indiana University. Education S. 

Xicol, Golda May Logansport, Ind. 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. Latin F. W. 

Osborn, Otho Charles Linton, Ind. 

A. B., 1911, Indiana University. Education S. 

Painter, Ruth Elaine Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1913, Roanoke College. English F. W. Sp. 

Palmer, Willa Norene Ligonier, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University; F. W. Sp. 

A.AI., 1913, Indiana University. 
Pfleuger, Luther Appel Ringtown, Pa. 

A. B., 1906, Muhlenberg College; German S. F. W. Sp. 

A. M., 1913, Indiana University. 
Philputt, Grace Maxwell Indianapolis, Ind. 

A. B., 1908, Indiana University. Romance Lang. . .S. 

Pickard, Airs. Lulu Estelle Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1910, Indiana University. Latin F. W. Sp. 

Pickett, Fermen Layton Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1910, Indiana University; Botany F. W. Sp. 

A.M., 1913, Indiana University. 
Quinn, Mrs. Ally Compton Carroll, Ind. 

A. B., 1905, Wilmington College. Latin F. W. Sp. 

Ramsey, Glen Blaine Jolietville, Ind. 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. Botany F. W. Sp. 

Ranck, Ethel Rose Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1911, Indiana University. German F. W. Sp. 



54 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

Ranck, George Guytner Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. History S. F. W. Sp. 

Ranck, Ralph Alonzo Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University; History S. F. W. Sp. 

LL.B.,1912, Indiana University. 
Randle, Foster Stookey Springfield, 111. 

A. B., 1911, De Pauw University. S. 

Records, Ralph Lafayette Edinburg, Ind. 

Ph. B., 1908, Franklin College; Geology S. 

A. M., 1910, Transylvania University. 
Renwick, Elizabeth Monticello, Ind. 

A.B., 1914, Indiana University. English Sp. 

Richards, Ernest Davis Ingalls, Ind. 

A. B., 1908, Indiana University. Education S. 

Riggs, Fred Princeton, Ind. 

A. B., Indiana University, 1914. Economics Sp. 

Risley, Lee Harrison Velpen, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. Chemistry S. 

Rizer, Eldridge Benton Wolcott, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. Education S. 

Robinson, James Jaquess Princeton, Ind. 

A.B., 1914, Indiana University. History Sp. 

Rubey, Nell Union City, Ind. 

B. S., 1910, Ohio Wesleyan University W. Sp. 

Schlotzhauer, Alma Elizabeth Indianapolis, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. English S. F. W. Sp. 

Shannon, James Vinton Atlanta, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. Mathematics. . . .S. 

Shekell, Oliver Morton Oriole, Ind. 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. S. 

Shemwell, Oscar T Benton, Ky. 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. Mathematics. . . .S. 

Sherwood, Henry Noble Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1909, Indiana University; History F. W. Sp. 

A.M., 1910, Indiana University. 
Shewman, William Denman Akron, Ind. 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. Physics S. F. W. Sp. 

Slaughter, Minnie May Rome, Ind. 

A. B., Indiana University, 1913. Chemistry Sp. 

Smil h, Mrs. Bessie Lee Charlestown, Ind. 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. Education S. F. \V. 

Smit h, Howard Clifton Sheldon, Ind. 

A. B., 1913, [ndiana University. Latin F. W. Sp. 

Smith, John Earl Lawrenceburg, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, [ndiana University. Physics S. 

Smil h, Ronald Boss Charles! own, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indian;. University. Education S. V. W. 

Stauffer, Samuel Boll and New Haven, Ind. 

A. I',., 1913, Indiana University. English S. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL ^) 

Steimle) . Leonard Leo Allien, Jnd. 

\. B., 1012, Indiana University; Mathematics . . . ,F. W. Sp, 

A.M., 1913, Indiana University. 

Sleinpel. Mis. M \ i! le Lnmierl Bloomington, 1 11(1 . 

A. B., L902, Indiana University. Philology F. W. Sp. 

Stephenson, Nettie Bedford, Ind. 

A. B., 1911, Indiana University. English 8. 

Stewart, Clifton Olcott Muncie, Ind. 

A. B., 1911, Indiana University. Chemistry S. 

St i at ton. William Timothjr Rcdkey, Ind. 

A. B., 1906, Indiana University. Mathematics. . . . S. 

Stuart, Elmer Henry Frankfort, Ind. 

A. B., Indiana University, 1914. Chemistry Sp. 

Stull, James Grant Bloomington, Ind. 

LL. B., 1901, Indiana University. Education S. 

Stump, Albert Cromwell, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. English F. W. Sp. 

Tanke, Clayton Ellsworth Pendleton, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. Chemistry S. 

Telfer, William Adams Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1910, Indiana University. English S. 

Thomas, John Hardin Rockport, Ind. 

A. B., 1907, Indiana University. Education F. W. Sp. 

Thompson, Donna Faye Indianapolis, Ind. 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. Economics F. W. 

Toelle, Howard Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. History F. W. Sp. 

Trapp, William Oscar Hoboken, N. J. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. Philosophy F. W. Sp. 

Trovillion, Mae Connie Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. Education F. W. Sp. 

Tueker, Forrest Glenn Georgetown, Ind. 

A. B., Indiana University, 1914. Physics Sp. 

Twining, Simon Ercile • Bowling Green, O. 

Ph. B., 1913, Notre Dame University. Economics F. W. Sp. 

1*1 rev, Sharon S North Manchester, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. History S. 

Van Auken, Clarice Clinton, Iowa. 

A. B., 1909, University of Wisconsin. German W. 

Vogel, William Frederick Boonville, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. Education S. 

Walker, Heber Pervis Oakland City, Ind. 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. History F. W. 

Weaver, William B 

A. B., Goshen College, 1914. History Sp. 

Wedeking, Albert Jesse Dale, Ind. 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. German S. 

White, Cecile Woodard Vnderson, Ind. 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. Philosophy F. 



56 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

Whitmarsh, Hardin Hardingrove, fiid. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. Education S. F. \V. Sp. 

Wilson, Charles Earl Brazil, Ind. 

A. B., Indiana University. Zoology Sp. 

Wissler, William Arthur Cambridge City, Ind. 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. Chemistry F. W. Sp 

Woerner, Myrtle Freeda Indianapolis, Ind. 

A. B., 1908, Indiana University. Latin S. 

Wolfe, Harold Eichholtz North Manchester, Ind. 

A. B., 1913, Indiana University. Mathematics. . . . F. W. Sp. 

Wood, Harry Warren Indianapolis, Ind. 

A. B., 1909, Indiana University. Geology S. 

Woody, Clifford Thorntown, Ind. 

A. B., 1908, Indiana University; Education S. F. W. Sp. 

A.M., 1913, Indiana University. 
Woolery, Ruth Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. Botany S. F. W . Sp. 

Wylie, Mrs. Irene Burtt Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1906, Indiana University; F. W. 

A.M., 1908, Indiana University. 
Yager, Sylvia Clark Bloomington, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. History S. 

Yates, Ola Wilson Vincennes, Ind. 

A. B., 1909, Vincennes University. English F. W. 

Yennc, Madge Janet Washington, Ind. 

A. B., 1912, Indiana University. Latin S. 



SUMMARY. 

Total enrollment of the Summer term 82 

Enrolled for the Summer term only GO 

Total enrollment of the Fall term 74 

Enrolled for the Fall term only 8 

Total enrollment of the Winter term " 79 

Enrollment for the Winter term only 5 

Total enrollment of the Spring term 67 

Enrolled for the Spring term only 4 

Enrolled for the Winter and Spring terms only 7 

Enrolled for the Summer and Fall terms only 1 

Enrolled for the Fall and Winter terms only 7 

Enrolled for I he Summer, Fall, Winter and Spring terms 14 

Enrolled for (he Fall, Winter and Spring terms 41 






Vol. XIV ( 
No. 3 J 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

(OFFICIAL SERIES) 



March 
1916 



Entered as second-class mail matter January 28, 1916, at the postoffice at Bloomington, 

Indiana, under the act of Congress of August 24, 1912. Published monthly, January, 
February. March, August, October, and December, and serni-monthly, April to June, inclusive, 
by Indiana University from the University office, Bloomington, Ind. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY 



GRADUATE^CHOOL 



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Announcements, 1916-17 



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Session days of First and Second semesters in bold faced figures. Days of Sumn 


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session 1916 (except special schedules ol the School of Education and of the School of 


Law), are in italic 



University Calendar 



SUMMER SESSION, 1916 



June IS, Thursday. 
June t6, Friday. 
August 11. Friday. 



Registration and enrollment in cl 
Recitations and lectures begin. 
Summer session ends. 



♦ ♦♦Special Schedules of the School of Education. — Courses for Class A and 
(Mass B teachers begin Monday, June 12, and end Friday, August 25. Research 
courses run from the opening of the Summer session until August 25. 



After July 24, in- 



School of Law. — Courses begin June 12 and end August 25 
struction is given six days a week 

Biological Station (at Winona Lake. Tnd.). Opens Saturday, June 17, and closes 
Friday, August 18. First half closes July 21, and second half begins July 15. 



REGULAR SESSION, 1916-17 

First Semester 



Sept. 18 and 19, Monday and Tuesday. 

September 19, Tuesday. 

September 20, Wednesday. 

Nov. 30 and Dec. 1, Thurs. and Friday. 

December 22 to January 1. 

January 2, Tuesday. 

January 19, Friday. 

January 22, Monday. 

January 30, Tuesday, 5:00 p.m. 



Matriculation and registration. 
Enrollment in classes. 
Recitations and lectures begin. 
Thanksgiving recess. 
Christmas recess. 
Work resumed. 
Foundation Day: a holiday. 
Final examinations begin. 
First semester ends. 



Second Semester 



Jan. 31 and Feb. 1, Wed. and Thurs. 

February 1, Thursday. 

February 2, Friday. 

February 22, Thursday. 

April 5, Thursday, 12 m. 

April 10, Tuesday. 

May 30, Wednesday. 

June 1, Friday. 

June 9, Saturday, 5:00 p.m. 

June 13, Wednesday. 



Matriculation and registration. 
Enrollment in classes. 
Recitations and lectures begin. 
Washington's Birthday: a holiday 
Easter vacation begins. 
Work resumed. 
Memorial Day: a holiday. 
Final examinations begin. 
Second semester ends. 
Commencement. 



(3) 



Contents 



PAGE 

Prefatory Note 6 

Officers and Faculty of the Graduate School 8 

The Graduate School — 
General Statement — 

Purpose and Administration 11 

Admission 11 

The Library 12 

Fees 12 

Degrees — 

Master of Arts 13 

Master of Science 14 

Doctor of Philosophy 14 

Application for Degrees 15 

Fellowships — 

University Fellowships 15 

Lawrence Fellowship in Astronomy 16 

Fellowships for Graduates of other Indiana Colleges 16 

Special Fellowships 17 

Special Rules concerning Fellows 17 

University Organizations — 

The Graduate Club 17 

Sigma Xi 17 

Phi Beta Kappa 17 

Departmental Clubs 18 

Waterman Institute for Scientific Research 18 

Departments and Courses of Instruction, 1916-17 — 

The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences — 

Greek 19 

Latin 20 

Romance Languages 22 

German 23 

Comparative Philology 25 

English 26 

1 1 Lstory 28 

I'olit ical Science 30 

Economies and Sociology 31 

Journalism 32 

Philosophy 32 

(4) 



Contents 5 

The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences -Continued. page 

Pine Arts 33 

Mathematics 34 

Astronomy 35 

Physics 3G 

Chemistry v . 37 

Geology 39 

Botany 40 

Zoology : 41 

Anatomy 41 

Physiology 42 

School of Education — 

Courses in Education 43 

Home Economics 45 

Register of Graduate Students, 1915-16 46 



Prefatory Note 



Indiana University is the State University of Indiana, and the 
head of the public school system of the State. It takes its origin 
from the State Seminary, which was established by act of the 
legislature, approved January 20, ,1820. In 1828 the title of the 
Seminary was changed by the legislature to that of the Indiana 
College, and in 1838 the University was given its present name. 
In 1867 Indiana University became coeducational. 

The University comprises the following schools: 

The College of Liberal Arts, founded as the Indiana 
Seminary in 1820. 

The School of Law, organized in 1842 and reorganized in 
1889. 

The School of Medicine, organized in 1903, and reorgan- 
ized in 1908. 

The Graduate School, organized in 1904. 

The School of Education, organized in 1908. 

The Extension Division, organized in 1912. 

The first advanced degrees conferred for graduate work were 
granted in 1882. During the 'eighties, well-defined regulations 
for graduate work and graduate degrees were stated in the Uni- 
versity Catalog, and a considerable number of graduate students 
were enrolled, especially in the natural sciences. In the years 
1882 to 1893, inclusive, the University graduated fourteen Doctors 
of Philosophy, ninety-nine Masters of Arts, and twelve Masters of 
Science. For some years following 1893, however, the Doctor's 
degree was not conferred. 

In 1904, there took place the segregation and formal organiza- 
tion of the Graduate School, and in 1908 the office of Dean of the 
Graduate School was created. 

This number of the Bulletin is devoted to setting forth the 
facilities for graduate work in the several departments of the 
University. Courses in! ended primarily for graduate students are 
described in lull. Brief announcements are given of courses 

(6) 



(Iuaduate School 7 

intended for both graduates and undergraduates. For further 
description of the In tier courses, see the bulletin of the College of 
Liberal Arts, or under thai heading in the University Catalog. 

The attention of graduates of other Indiana colleges is invited 
to the announcement on page 16 of ten fellowships established by 
t he Hoard of Trustees for such students. The value of these 
fellowships is $200 each; they also carry with them exemption 
from Contingent and Library fees. For further information con- 
cerning the Graduate School, address, 

The Dean of the Graduate School, 

Bloomington, Indiana. 



Officers and Faculty of the Graduate School 



COUNCIL 

*Carl H Eigenmann, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School, and Professor 
of Zoology. 

Robert Edward Lyonh, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Arthur Lee Foley, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 

David Myers Mottier, Ph.D., Professor of Botany. 

Ulysses Grant Weatherly, Ph.D., Litt.D., Professor of Economics and 
Sociology. 

Ernest Hiram Lindley, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy and Psychology. 

Burton Dorr Myers, A.M., M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

Samuel Bannister Harding, Ph.D., Professor of European History. 

Bert John Vos, Ph.D., Professor of German. 

David Andrew Rothrock, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

William J Moenkhaus, Ph.D., Professor of Physiology. 

Alfred Mansfield Brooks, A.M., Professor of Fine Arts. 

Will David Howe, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

William Wesley Black, A.M., Dean of the School of Education, and Pro- 
fessor of Elementary Education. 

Edgar Roscoe Cumings, Ph.D., Professor of Geology. 

Selatie Edgar Stout, Ph.D., Professor of Latin. 

George Davis Morris, Dr.d'Uriiv. (Paris), Associate Professor of French. 

Frank William Tilden, A.M., Associate Professor of Greek. 

Guido Hermann Stempel, A.M., Associate Professor of Comparative 
Philology. 

Wilbur Adelman Cogshall, A.M., Associate Professor of Astronomy. 

Prank Greene Bates, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Political Science, 
and Secretary of the Council. 

FACULTY OK THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

William Lowe Bryan, Ph.D., LL.D., President of the University. 
Horace Addison Hoffman, A.M., Professor of Greek. 
James Albert Woodburn, Ph.D., LL.D., Professor of American History. 
♦Carl II Eigenmann, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology, and Director of the 
Biological Station. 
Robert Edward Lyons, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 
ARTHUR Lee FOLEY Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 
David Myers Mottier, Ph.D., Professor of Botany. 
Albert Frederick Kuersteiner, Ph.D., Professor of Romance Languages. 

♦Relieved of teaching duties from August I, L915, to August I, 1916. 

(8) 



Graduate School 9 

Ulysses Grant Weatherly, Ph.D., Lilt. I)., Professor of Economics and 
Sociology. 

Ernest Hiram Lindley, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy and Psychology. 

Burton Dorr Myers, A.M., M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

Sami ii Bannister Harding, Ph.D., Professor of European History. 

Amos Shartle Hershey, Ph.D., Professor of Political Science and Inter- 
national Law. 

Bert John Vos, Ph.D., Professor of German. 

William A Raw les, Ph.D., Professor of Political Economy. 

Carl Wilhelm Ferdinand Osthaus, A.M., Professor of German. 

Si huyler Colfax Davisson, Sc.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

David Andrew Rothrock, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

William .1 Moenkhaus, Ph.D., Professor of Physiology. 

Louis Sherman Davis, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Alfred Mansfield Brooks, A.M., Professor of Fine Arts. 

Will David Howe, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

William Wesley Black, A.M., Dean of the School of Education, and 
Professor of Elementary Education. 

Charles Jacob Sembower, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Edgar Roscoe Cumings, Ph.D., Professor of Geology. 
*William Frederick Book, Ph.D., Professor of Educational Psychology. 

Robert Josselyn Leonard, A.M., Director of Vocational Education. 

Selatie Edgar Stout, Ph.D., Professor of Latin. 

William Baird Elkin, Ph.D., Acting Professor of Philosophy. 

John Welhoff Todd, Ph.D., Acting Professor of Educational Psychology. 

George Davis Morris, Dr. d'Univ. (Paris), Associate Professor of French. 

Frank William Tilden, A.M., Associate Professor of Greek. 

Guido Hermann Stempel, A.M., Associate Professor of Comparative 
Philology. 

Charles Alfred Mosemiller, A.B., Associate Professor of Romance 
Languages. 

Rolla Roy Ramsey, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics. 
*Oliver W. Brown, A.M., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Frank Marion Andrews, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Botany. 

Lillian Gay Berry, A.M., Associate Professor of Latin. 

Henry Thew Stephenson, B.S., A.B., Associate Professor of English. 

Wilbur Adelman Cogshall, A.M., Associate Professor of Astronomy. 

Ulysses Sherman Hanna, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Joshua William Beede, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Geology. 

Frank Greene Bates, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Political Science. 

Frank Curry Mathers, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Clarence Earl May, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 
IMelvin Everett Haggerty, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology. 

Fernandus Payne, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Zoology. 

Mabel Thacher Wellman, A.B., Associate Professor of Home Economics. 

Hubert Guy Childs, A.M., Associate Professor of Education. 
IRichard Ashley Rice, A.M., Associate Professor of English. 

*Absent on leave from August 1, 1915, to August 1, 1916. 

tResigned, February 15, 1916. 

^Resigned. Resignation to be effective August 1, 1916. 



10 Indiana University 

John Benjamin Dutcher, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physios 

George Fullmer Reynolds, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English. 

James M Van Hook, A.M., Assistant Professor of Botany. 

Will Scott, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

Robert E Burke, A.M., Assistant Professor of Fine Arts. 

Fred A Molby, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics. 

Elizabeth Sage, Assistant Professor of Home Economics. 

Frank Tenney Stockton, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Economics and 

Sociology. 
Albert Ludwig Kohlmeier, A.M., Assistant Professor of History. 
Kenneth Powers Williams, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 
Preston Albert Barba, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of German. 
*James Grover McDonald, A.M., Assistant Professor of History. 
John Ambrose Hess, A.M., Assistant Professor of German. 
Jacob A. Badertscher, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Anatomy. 
Frances Lucy Swain, B. S.,A.M., Assistant Professor of Home Economics. 
William Andrew Myers, A.M., Lecturer on School Administration. 
Clarence Edmund Edmondson, Ph.D., Instructor in Physiology. 
Logan Esarey, Ph.D., Instructor in Western History. 
Jesse James Galloway, Ph.D., Instructor in Geology. 
Mildred Arbro Hoge, Ph.D., Instructor in Zoology. 
Ernest Marshall Linton, Ph.D., Instructor in Political Science. 
George Clyde Hale, A.B., Instructor in Chemistry. 

*Absent on leave from August 1, 1915, to August 1, 1916. 



The Graduate School 



GENERAL STATEMENT 

Purpose and Administration. The Graduate School fur- 
nishes opportunities for advanced work leading to careers in higher 
education and in certain lines of investigation. It does not offer 
work leading to professional degrees in law or in medicine. 

The work of the School is a direct continuation of that of the 
College of Liberal Arts; as such it is the most advanced work in 
education undertaken by the State. 

The School is administered by the Council of the Graduate 
School. It is composed of members of the Faculty representing 
different fields of learning. 

Not all departments of the University are at present equally 
equipped for graduate work. In recognition of this fact, the 
amount of graduate work offered by the different departments 
varies. Some departments offer work for the A.M. degree only, 
while others offer work leading to the Ph.D. degree. 

Admission. Students holding a Bachelor's degree in Arts, or 
in Science, from Indiana University, or the same degree, or its 
equivalent, from institutions of similar rank, are admitted to the 
Graduate School on presentation of satisfactory credentials, which 
should include a certificate of graduation and a transcript of the 
college record. Persons holding the Bachelor's degree from insti- 
tutions whose requirements are considered to lack a year, or more, 
of being the equivalent of the A.B. degree from this institution, are 
not admitted to the Graduate School. They may enter the College 
of Liberal Arts, and are referred to the Dean of the College for 
their standing. Holders of the A.B. degree, or its equivalent, from 
institutions whose requirements lack less than a year of being the 
equivalent of the A.B. degree from this institution may be ad- 
mitted to the Graduate School. In such cases, work in addition to 
the minimum of thirty hours for the A.M. degree will be required. 
The amount will be determined in each case by the Council of the 
Graduate School. In all cases, the student must complete to 
the satisfaction of the department of the major subject the grad- 

(ii) 



12 Indiana University 

uate work required in that department for the A.M. or the Ph.D. 
degree. 

All graduate students will enroll at the beginning of each 
semester, and those entering regularly organized classes will sub- 
mit to the same regulations as undergraduate students. Work 
will in many cases be individual and not controlled by a recitation 
schedule. At the time of entrance to the Graduate School the 
student must submit a plan of the entire work he wishes to present 
for the Master's or Doctor's degree. This plan must be approved 
by the professor of the major subject and the Dean of the Graduate 
School. Graduate work done before filing such plan will ordinarily 
not be counted toward advanced degrees. 

The Library. The library of Indiana University at present 
contains over 108,000 cataloged volumes. The selection of these 
books has been made with a view to facilitating instruction and 
research. The collection is a well-balanced one, but is especially 
strong in literal and scientific periodicals. The list of periodicals 
received and permanently kept on file by the library numbers 
about four hundred, and includes American, English, German, 
French, and, to a less extent, Italian, Spanish, and Swedish publi- 
cations. The library is made thoroly usable by a carefully pre- 
pared card catalog, by indexes, and by other bibliographical aids. 

In the library building are seminary rooms for the Departments 
of History, Economics, Philosophy, German, Romance Languages, 
Latin, Greek, and Political Science. 

In addition to the central library, where the general literary 
and historical collections are housed, there are nine departmental 
collections, of varying sizes, kept in the different University build- 
ings. 

All books, with the exception of periodicals and books reserved 
for reference, may be drawn for home use. Each student may draw 
books for two weeks, with privilege of renewal, but subject to 
recall. 

The library is open Monday to Friday, from 7:45 a.m. to 10:00 
p.m., and on Saturdays from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 

Fees. Students who are legal residents of the Slate of Indi- 
ana are charged a Contingent fee of seven and one-half dollars a 
semester, and a Library fee of one and one-half dollars a semester. 
These fees cover in part the cost of the physical maintenance of 
the University, and are not applied to the cost of tuition, which is 
provided wholly by the State. 



( rRADUATE School (.3 

Students not legal residents of the Slate of Indiana will be 
charged a Contingent and Library fee amounting to thirty dollars 
a semester. The Summer session fee is fifteen dollars, irrespective 
of the length of the course, except for a half-term's work in law, 
where ten dollars is charged. 

The Laboratory i'ves in all courses are uniformly one dollar 
and a half per credit hour,* except in the School of Medicine, and 
for courses in domestic art. In the latter case the fee is one dollar 
a >cmester. 

The ( rymnasium fee, if the work in physical education is taken, 
is one and one-half dollars a semester. 

An Examination fee of one dollar is charged for each make-up, 
or special, examination. This fee is paid to the Bursar; his receipt, 
when presented to the proper instructor, constitutes the authoriza- 
tion for holding the examination. 

The fee for any Degree is five dollars, and must be paid to the 
Bursar at least thirty days before graduation. 

DEGREES 

Three advanced degrees, Master of Arts, Master of Science, 
and Doctor of Philosophy, are conferred by the University. 

Master of Arts. The degree Master of Arts may be conferred 
upon Bachelors of Arts of this University, or of any other institu- 
tion of equivalent standing, or upon Bachelors of Science provided 
this degree is an alternative equivalent of the A.B. degree, fol- 
lowing a residence at the University of a minimum of two semes- 
ters and the completion of a minimum of thirty hours of University 
credit. 

Credits earned in excess of those required for the A.B. or the 
B.S. degrees, before the degree is conferred or a certificate of the 
completion of the work for the degree is issued, are not counted 
toward the A.M. degree without special action of the Graduate 
Council before the work is done. 

Twenty of the total of thirty hours required for the A.M. degree 
must be in one department, or in closely allied departments. Ten 
hours must be distinctly graduate in character. There is no 
restriction as to the amount of work that may be carried during 
any semester. 

*The increased cost of chemicals and other laboratory supplies, owing to the 
European war, necessitated an increase of ten to fifteen percent in the laboratory fees 
of certain departments in 1915-16. 



14 Indiana University 

The work for the A.M. degree may all be done in Summer ses- 
sions, provided that the work for the degree be completed within 
five years. 

Professional studies arc not accepted for the graduate degrees, 
but research work on professional subjects may be accepted for 
these degrees at the option of the professor in charge of the major 
subject. 

A thesis is required in all departments except in the Depart- 
ments of English and Latin. 

Freshman courses shall not be counted on advanced degrees. 

The first ten hours in beginning French and German do jiot 
count on advanced degrees except by permission of the Graduate 
Council, on the written recommendation of the professor in charge 
of the major subject. The Council shall in such cases fix the 
amount of credit to be given. The amount of credit that a student 
may receive for elementary courses in other subjects is determined 
by the professor in charge of the major subject. 

It is strongly urged that all students gain some proficiency in 
foreign modern language before entering the Graduate School. 
Credit in ten hours in modern foreign language, or the certified 
equivalent, is required of candidates for the A.M. degree. If the 
candidate does not meet this requirement before entering the 
Graduate School, he must obtain credit for ten hours of foreign 
language in addition to the regular thirty hours required for the 
A.M. degree, unless by special act of the Graduate Council partial 
credit is allowed for this work in accordance with the provisions 
noted in the preceding paragraph. 

Master of Science. The degree Master of Science may be 
conferred upon Bachelors of Science of Indiana University under 
the same conditions upon which the degree of Master of Arts is 
conferred on Bachelors of Arts. 

Doctor of Philosophy. The degree Doctor of Philosophy 
may be conferred upon graduates of this University, or of any in- 
stitution of similar character and rank, upon the completion of an 
advanced course of study of not less than three years. 

Each candidate for this degree will select a major subject con- 
sisting of the work of some one department or recognized sub- 
division of* a department; and not less than two minors, at least 
one of which must be in some department related to, but distinct 
from, t fiat of t he major subject . 

The course for the degree will be pursued under the direction 



Graduate School 15 

of a committee consisting of the heads of the departments in which 
the work is done. Its value will be determined by a final examina- 
tion, and by the presentation of a satisfactory thesis. The thesis 
should usually embody original work upon some prescribed or 
accepted subject; it must always give evidence that the candidate 
is capable of forming an independent judgment upon the recent 
literature of his department. 

A detailed statement of the work offered for the degree, in- 
dorsed by the professor in charge of the major subject, must be 
submitted to the Council of the Graduate School not later than 
May 10 of the year in which the candidate presents himself for 
examination. 

On the recommendation of the professor in charge of the major 
subject, and with the concurrence of the Council of the Graduate 
School, part of the three years' study required for this degree may 
be spent in residence at other universities. 

The thesis of every candidate for the Doctor's degree shall be 
presented to the Council of the Graduate School on or before the 
first day of June of the year in which he is a candidate for the 
degree. The thesis must be indorsed by the head of the depart- 
ment as being in its final form, and ready for the press. If the 
candidate is recommended for the degree, arrangements must be 
made to deposit five printed copies of the thesis in the library. 

Examinations of each candidate for this degree will be con- 
ducted by a committee consisting of all the instructors under whom 
graduate work has been taken, in the presence of such members of 
the Faculty of the School as care to attend. 

At least one year before the final examination the candidate 
shall satisfy the professor in charge of the major subject of his 
ability to use French and German for purposes of investigation. 

Application for Degrees. Application for advanced degrees 
must be filed with the Dean at the time of admission to the Grad- 
uate School. Application for the Doctor's degree must be on file 
at least one year before the candidate is admitted to the exami- 
nation. 

FELLOWSHIPS 

University Fellowships. A number of University fellow- 
ships are available for graduate students. These fellowships carry 
with them an honorarium of between $200 and $500 annually. 
The highest amount will ordinarily be paid only if the incumbent 



16 . Indiana University 

is appointed for a third year. A fellowship is a recognition of 
scholarship. A portion of the fellow's time may be required in 
the service of the department in which he is appointed. Appoint- 
ments are for one year. 

Lawrence Fellowship in Astronomy. The Lawrence Fel- 
lowship of the Department of Astronomy has been established by 
Mr. Percival Lowell, of the Lowell Observatory, upon the following 
terms and conditions: 

1. The fellowship shall be known as the Lawrence Fellowship, in 
remembrance of the donor's mother, and is established in perpetuity, re- 
vocable, however, at any time at the will of the founder. 

2. It shall be annually available and shall cover the college calendar 
year, that is, from commencement to commencement of the same. 

3. The applicant shall be appointed by the Department, the donor 
reserving the right of finally passing upon the suitability of the candidate 
so presented. 

4. The fellow shall be given time and opportunity for an original 
thesis on some astronomical subject looking to the taking of a Master's 
degree, the nature of which shall be decided by the Director and the fel- 
low. But the fellow shall be expected to give general assistance in the 
work of the observatory during the period of his fellowship. 

5. The fellowship will pay $600 and the fellow's traveling expenses 
to and from the Observatory at Flagstaff, Ariz.; and a furnished room at 
the Observatory shall be free to the fellow's use. 

Fellowships for Graduates of Other Indiana Colleges. 

The Trustees of Indiana University, at their March meeting, 1910, 
established ten graduate fellowships of an annual value of -1200 
each, to be held by graduates of other colleges in the State. In 
awarding these fellowships the policy will be to assign them to 
the most promising students, irrespective of the special field of 
study in which they wish to work, or the particular institutions 
from which they come. As between cases of equal merit, how- 
ever, attention will be given to securing a distribution of the 
awards among different departments of study and different colleges 
of t he State. 

Applicants for these fellowships should file a statement of their 
educational history arid of their plans with the Dean of the Grad- 
uate School. They should indicate in this statement the major 
subject which they wish to pursue, arid give 1 a transcript of their 
college record. They should also present, at this time recommenda- 
tions from their instructors, and such other 1 evidences of their 
fitness a;- they c;in offer. Applications will be received up to 
March I of each year. 



( rRADUATE SCHOOL 17 

Applications will be referred in each case to the department 
concerned for a decision upon the respective merits of the appli- 
cants in that department. On the basis of the departmental re- 
ports, the Graduate Council will recommend to the Trustees the 
most eligible candidate for appointment. 

These fellowships are not open to students doing professional 
work in Law or in Medicine. 

For application blanks, and further information, address the 
Dean of the Graduate School. 

Special Fellowships. There are besides the fellowships men- 
tioned above, three special fellowships ranging in value from $500 
to $1 ,000. These fellowships are created only for men of excep- 
tional ability and merit, who may or may not have received the 
Ph.D. degree. 

Special Rules Concerning Fellows. Holders of fellowships 
may be required to render some service to the University and are 
not permitted, without the special permission of the Graduate 
Council, to do other work for remuneration. 

All fellows are exempted from the payment of semester fees. 

UNIVERSITY ORGANIZATIONS 

The Graduate Club. The Graduate Club was founded in 
1910 to establish closer relations among the graduate students, 
and between graduate students and the members of the Faculty. 
Thru closer association and acquaintanceship, the club aims to 
foster solidarity of interest. The meetings are in part social, and 
in part devoted to the presentation of papers by the members of 
the club, giving the results of some investigation carried on by the 
author. In this way students in the different departments are 
made acquainted with the work in various lines of research carried 
on in the University. Occasionally addresses are given by visitors 
of prominence. Membership in the club is open to all graduate 
students. 

Sigma Xi. Sigma Xi is an organization especially for scien- 
tific students. It is a chapter of a national scientific fraternity, to 
which members of the Faculty and graduate students may be 
elected. Its object is to encourage investigation in science, pure 
and applied. 

Phi Beta Kappa. Phi Beta Kappa is a chapter of the oldest 
Greek-letter fraternity, founded in 1776 for "the promotion of 



18 Indiana University 

scholarship and friendship among students and graduates of 
American colleges". It is today no longer a secret society, but 
an honor society, having for its special aim the encouragement of 
liberal culture. At Indiana University a certain number of 
Seniors, not over ten percent, are elected each year, partly at 
Thanksgiving and partly at Commencement. The membership 
includes also certain members of the Faculty, and a few others 
chosen directly from the ranks of the alumni. The chapter was 
established on Foundation Day, 1911. 

Departmental Clubs. The following departments have 
special departmental clubs: Physics, Chemistry, History and 
Political Science, Philosophy, English, Mathematics, German, 
Romance Languages (two clubs, French and Spanish), Home 
Economics, Botany, Economics and Sociology, and Comparative 
Philology. Membership in these clubs is open to Faculty mem- 
bers of the departments, graduate students, and undergraduates. 
The purpose of the clubs is to discuss topics of interest to members, 
and to promote social intercourse. 

WATERMAN INSTITUTE FOR SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH 

At a meeting of the Trustees of the University on May 12, 
1915, Dr. Luther Dana Waterman, Professor Emeritus of Medi- 
cine in the Indiana University School of Medicine, presented to 
the Trustees deeds for property amounting in value to ST 00,000, 
on the following conditions: 

1. That he shall retain the management and income from the property 
during his lifetime. 

2. That the proceeds from the property be devoted to the establish- 
i in ill and permanent maintenance of an Institute for Scientific Research. 

'A. That the Trustees bind themselves to appropriate annually an 
amount of money for the Institute equal to the annual proceeds from the 
property. 

The Trust cos accepted the proposal of Dr. Waterman in the 
following terms : "Resolved, That the generous gift of Dr. Luther 
I). Waterman to the University for the purpose therein stated 
be and is hereby accepted with the thanks of the Board. We 
hereby pledge the faith of the institution to carry out the con- 
dil ions therein contained." 



Departments and Courses of Instruction, 1916-17 



***In the following list are included many courses which are open alike to graduates 
and advanced underclassmen. Only a skeleton announcement of these is here made; 
for full description see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under that heading 
in the University Catalog. Strictly graduate courses are described in full. The more 
elementary courses are not listed here at all. 



(graduate ^rljnnl of Artfi anb &timt?8 



DEPARTMENT OF GREEK 

Horace A. Hoffman, Professor. 
Frank W. Tilden, Associate Professor. 

The time that may be at present profitably devoted to grad- 
uate work in Greek is one year, leading- to the A.M. degree. A 
thesis on some subject connected with the seminary work of the 
year is required for the degree. 

All candidates for the A.M. degree with Greek as major sub- 
ject are recommended to take at least ten hours in Latin, in ad- 
vance of the Latin taken in the undergraduate study. 

Courses 9, 12, and 13, or any part of these courses, are also 
open as minors to graduate students who have not already had as 
part of their undergraduate study the work which they take in 
these courses for graduate credit. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the 
Department : 

[9. Lyric and Dramatic Poetry. Associate Professor Tilden. 
First and Second semesters, daily, at hours to be arranged.] 
Omitted in 1916-17. 

12. Philosophical Prose. Professor Hoffman. 
First and Second semesters, T. Th., at 10:00. 

13. Historical and Rhetorical Prose. Associate Professor Tilden. 
First and Second semesters, M. W. F., at hours to be appointed. 

(19) 



20 Indiana University 

15A. Graduate Seminary. Euripides is the author usually studied, but 
other authors may be selected. Professor Hoffman. 
First and Second semesters, Th., at hours to l>e appointed. 

15B. Graduate Seminary. Author studied to be selected. Associate 
Professor Tilden. 
First and Second semesters, F., at hours to be appointed. 



DEPARTMENT OF LATIN 

Selatie E. Stout, Professor. 

Lillian G. Berry, Associate Professor. 

Students who begin the graduate study of Latin after having 
completed an undergraduate course in the subject equivalent to 
that required of a major in the Department in Indiana University 
can complete the work for the Master's degree in one year. In 
special cases the work can all be done in summer sessions, but it 
can be done more satisfactorily in a year of continuous residence. 
The writing of a thesis is not required of all candidates for the 
Master's degree, but it is advised for those who expect to take 
additional work looking to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 
The thesis, if written, will be allowed to count for one graduate 
course thru one semester, and its development will be rather closely 
supervised by conferences with the professor in charge. The work 
required for the Master's degree, while affording an introduction 
to the methods of investigation, is arranged primarily to give a 
wider and more thoro acquaintance with the language and litera- 
ture, institutions and history of the Roman people. It is hoped 
that this will meet equally well the needs of those who wish to 
become better teachers of Latin in the high schools and the lower 
grades of the college course, and of those who desire a proper 
foundation for the more advanced study of Latin. 

The purely graduate courses at present offered, and those to 
be added, will be given in a series such as to offer opportunity 
for a three years' course of graduate study. Candidates for the 
Ph.D. degree whose major subject of study is Latin are required 
to make Greek their principal minor subject. A wide range of 
choice will be allowed for I lie second minor subject, the only re- 
quirement being that such courses shall contribute in some definite 
way lo (he principal work of the candidate. Every library resource 
required for - investigations assigned by I he Department will be 
supplied if nol at present in the library. 



Graduate School 21 

The Junior and Senior reading courses (Courses S3A, B, C, D, 
ami 11.1, B, C D) of the undergraduate work may be taken for 
graduate credit if certain additional work of graduate character 
assigned by the instinct or be done in connection with them. The 
authors read in these courses are varied in different years, and 
thru a three-year period afford graduate students opportunity for 
a wide course of reading. 

31. History of Latin Literature. Associate Professor Berry. 
First semester, T. Th., at 9:00. 

[33.4. Cicero: Tusculan Disputations, Book i. Associate Professor Berry. 
First semester, M. W. F., at 9:00.] 
Omitted in 1916-17. 

[33/?. Plautus. Associate Professor Berry. 
Second semester, M. W. F., at 9:00.] 
Omitted in 1916-17. 

33 C. Prose of the Empire. Associate Professor Berry. 
First semester, M. W. F., at 9:00. 

33D. Juvenal: Selected Satires. Associate Professor Berry. 
Second semester, M. W. F., at 9:00. 

F41 A. The Classical Historians of Rome: Sallust, Livy. Professor Stout. 
First semester, M. W. F., at 11:00.] 
Omitted in 1916-17. 

\41B. Vergil: 'Aeneid', 'Bucolics', and 'Georgics'. Professor Stout. 
Second semester, M. W. F., at 11:00.] 
Omitted in 1916-17. 

41C. Cicero: Orations. Professor Stout. 
First semester, M. W. F., at 11:00. 

41 D. Readings from the Latin poets. Professor Stout. 
Second semester, M. W. F., at 11:00. 

43. Advanced Prose Composition. Professor Stout. 
Second semester, T. Th., at 11:00. 

[51. Latin Inscriptions. A course to teach the use of inscriptions for 
purposes of investigation. Professor Stout.] 
Omitted in 1916-17. 

52. The Topography and Monuments of Ancient Rome. This subject 
is studied from ancient and medieval sources; Greek and Latin 
literature, inscriptions, the Capitoline plan, regionary catalogs, 
coins, reliefs, medieval itineraries, maps, and sketches. The in- 
formation drawn from these sources is studied in the light of 
recent researches. Associate Professor Berry. 

First and Second semesters, T., 4:00 to 5:50. 

Open to graduates only. 



22 Indiana University 

53. The Reign of Augustus Caesar. Studied from the sources. The 
authors and inscriptions bearing on this period are read with special 
reference to the changes in the system of government by which 
the republic passed into the empire, and to the conditions which 
made these changes necessary. Professor Stout. 
Summer session, daily, at 9:00. 

[61. Seminary: The Letters of Pliny the Younger. The first half of this 
course is an introduction to the science of text criticism, based 
on the text of the Letters of Pliny. The second half of the course 
is a series of studies on topics connected with the language and the 
subject-matter of the letters. Professor Stout. 

First and Second semesters, Th., 4:00 to 5:50, and another hour 
to be arranged. 

Open to graduate students only.l 

Omitted in 1916-17. 

62. Seminary: Political Problems of the Romans. A study from the 
sources of problems of government developed and solved by the 
Roman people, first for the city and Italy, and later for the 
empire. The latter part of the course is devoted principally to 
problems connected with the administration of the provinces 
and the municipalities under the empire. Professor Stout. 

First and Second semesters, Th., 4:00 to 5:50. 

Open to graduate students only. 

DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES 

Albert F. Kuersteiner, Professor of Romance Languages. 

George D. Morris, Associate Professor of French. 

Charles A. Mosemiller, Associate Professor of Romance Languages. 

The Department of Romance Languages offers one year of 
graduate work, leading to the degree of Master of Arts. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the 
Department: 

7. Seventeenth Century Poetry and Drama. Professor Kuersteiner. 
First and Second semesters, M. W. F., at 9:00. 

[24. Eighteenth Century Poetry and Drama. Professor Kuersteiner. 
First and Second semesters, M. W. F., at 9:00.] 
Omitted in L916-17. 

1 10. Nineteenth Century: The Romantic Period. Associate Professor 
Morris. 
First and Second semesters, M. W. P., at 10:00.] 
Omitted in 1010-17. 

27. Nineteenth Century: The Realistic Period. Associate Professor 
Morris. 
First and Second semesters, M. W. F., at 10:00. 



Graduate School 23 

[32. Conl niporary Fiction. Associate Professor Morris. 
First and Second semesters, T. Th., at 10:00.] 
Omitted in 1916-17. 

33. Contemporary Drama. Associate Professor Morris. 
First and Second semesters, T. Th., at 10:00. 

26. Advanced Composition. Associate Professor Mosemiller. 
First and Second semesters, T. Th., at 9:00. 

28. Senior Composition. Associate Professor Mosemiller. 
First and Second semesters, T. Th., at 2:00. 

13. Old French. Reading of texts; study of Old French phonology and 
morphology; exercises in tracing words from Classical and Vulgar 
Latin to Modern French. Lectures. Associate Professor Mose- 
miller. 

First and Second, semesters, M. W. F., at 2:00. 

Paris, 'Extraits de la Chanson de Roland'; Suchier, 'Aucassin et 
Nicolete' (French edition); Constans, 'Chrestomathie du moyen- 
age'; Paris-Langlois, 'Extraits des chroniqueurs francais'. 

Open to students who have studied Latin and French. 

35. Vulgar Latin. Lectures on the phonology and morphology of Vulgar 
Latin; relation to Classical Latin and to the Romance Languages. 
Professor Kuersteiner. 
First and Second semesters, T. Th., at 11:00. 

DEPARTMENT OF GERMAN 

Bert J. Vos, Professor. 
Carl W. F. Osthaus, Professor. 
Preston A. Barba, Assistant Professor. 
John A. Hess, Assistant Professor. 

In conjunction with the Department of Comparative Philology, 
which offers courses in Gothic, Old High German, and Old Norse, 
the Department at present gives about forty hours of graduate 
work. Students entering upon the graduate study of German must 
previously have completed the courses required for a major in 
the Department, or their equivalent. Courses 27 and 29 are, 
however, open to students of departments other than German upon 
the completion of the work of the Junior year. The periodicals 
and the more important works of reference are placed in the 
Seminary Room, to which graduate students have access. 

For Gothic and Old High German, see Courses 4 and 9 of the 
Department of Comparative Philology. 



24 Indiana University 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the 
Department : 

14. German Usage. Assistant Professor Hess. 

Second semester, T. Th., at an hour to be appointed. 

30. Studies in the Modern German Drama. Lectures, reports, inter- 

pretations. The authors treated in this course differ from year 
to year. In 1915-16 the drama of Hebbel was studied. Con- 
ducted in German. Professor Osthaus. 
First semester, M. W. F., at an hour to be appointed. 

28. Journal Club. This course is introductory to the work of the German 

Seminary. Members make reports upon the contents of current 
numbers of journals devoted to German literature and philology, 
and are trained in the use of important works of reference. Two 
to five hours' credit. Professor Vos. 
First semester, two hours weekly, at an hour to be appointed. 

22. German Seminary: Schiller. Conducted, so far as feasible, in 
German. Two to five hours' credit. Professor Vos and Assistant 
Professor Barba. 
Second semester, two hours weekly, at an hour to be appointed. 
Open to students who have completed Course 28. 

27. Middle High German. Outline of the phonology, accidence, and 
syntax. Reading of selections from the lyric poets, the popular 
and court epic. Conducted in German. Professor Vos. 

First semester, two hours weekly, at an hour to be appointed. 

Paul, 'Mittelhochdeutsche Grammatik'. 

29. History of the German Language. The relation of German to other 

Germanic languages; the dialect divisions of Modern German; 
origin of the literary language; changes since the middle period; 
history of German orthography. Professor Vos. 
Second semester, two hours weekly, at an hour to be appointed. 

31. Research. Individual conferences on subjects assigned for investi- 

gation to candidates for higher degrees. Professor Vos. 
First and Second semesters, at hours to be arranged. 



(iirvDUATE School 25 

DEPARTMENT OF COMPARATIVE PHILOLOGY 

(I iido II. Stempel, Associate Professor. 

The graduate courses offered below will be extended as re- 
quired. They may he supplemented by certain of the courses 
listed as undergraduate, as well as by certain courses given in 
the other language departments and in History, Sociology (De- 
scriptive Sociology), Philosophy, and English. 

[5. Comparative Philology of the Classical Languages. An advanced 
course in the science of language and Indo-European philology. 
Associate Professor Stempel. 

First and Second semesters, M. W. F., at 10:00. 

Ores, 'Manual of Comparative Philology for Classical Students'. 

Open to students who have passed in Courses 2 and 3, and in twenty 
hours of language, and to advanced students in Latin or Greek.] 

Omitted in 1916-17. 

4. Gothic. Grammar and reading; phonology of the early Germanic 

languages. Associate Professor Stempel. 
First and Second semesters, T. Th., at 10:00. 
Wright, 'Grammar of the Gothic Language'; Streitberg, 'Die gotische 

BibeF. 
Open to students who have passed in Course 2 and in twenty hours 

of language, and to others at the option of the instructor- 
Given every other year, alternating with Course 9. 

[8. Sanskrit. Mr. . 

First and Second semesters, M. W. F., at 10:00. 

Perry, 'Sanskrit Primer' (or Lanman, 'Sanskrit Reader'); and Whit- 
ney, 'Sanskrit Grammar'. 

Open to advanced students in Latin or Greek at the option of the 
instructor.] 

Omitted in 1916-17. 

[9. Old High German. Elements of the grammar, reading of selected 
texts, study of dialectal divergence. The method will be both 
comparative and historical. Associate Professor Stempel. 

First and Second semesters, T. Th., at 10:00. 

Wright, 'Old High German Primer'; Braune, 'Althochdeutsche Gram- 
matik'; Braune, 'Althochdeutsches Lesebuch'. 

Open to students on same conditions as Course 4.] 

Omitted in 1916-17. Given every other year, alternating with 
Course 4. 

[10. Middle High German. Elements of the grammar, reading of easy 
texts. 'Nibelungenlied', with special study of the popular epic. 
First and Second semesters, T. Th., at 10:00. 



26 Indiana University 

Wright, 'Middle High German Primer'; Paul, 'Mittelhochdeutsche 
Grammatik'; Robertson, 'Der Arme Heinrich'; Zarncke, 'Das 
Nibehmgenlied'. 

Open to students on same conditions as Course 4.] 

Omitted in 1916-17. 

11. Old Icelandic. Introduction to the language, and the reading of texts 

that throw light upon the popular literature of England and 

Germany. Associate Professor Stempel. 
First and Second semesters, M. W. F., at 11:00. 
Sweet, 'Icelandic Primer'; Heusler, 'Altislandisches Elementarbuch' ; 

selected texts. 
Open to students who have passed in ten hours of Germanic philology 

and to others at the option of the instructor. 

15. Seminary in Historical English Grammar. Associate Professor 
Stempel. 
First and Second semesters, W., 2:00 to 3:50. 

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

Will D. Howe, Professor. 
Charles J. Sembower, Professor. 
Henry T. Stephenson, Associate Professor. 
*Richard A. Rice, Associate Professor. 
George F. Reynolds, Associate Professor. 

The Department is prepared to offer research work leading to 
the A.M. and Ph.D. degrees, in the following periods: Elizabethan 
literature, the literature of the seventeenth century, of the eight- 
eenth century, and of the first half of the nineteenth century. 

For the A.M. degree, the candidate should have had in his 
undergraduate work the equivalent of thirty hours of English, 
and should, in his graduate work, pursue a course restricted to 
three subjects, approved by the Department of English. 

For the Ph.D. degree, the candidate will be expected to do at 
least two full years' work in residence after the Master's degree. 
He must be able to read German and French, and to do a piece of 
independent research which will be acceptable to the Department. 

The following courses are open to graduate students in the 
Depart nient : 

51. Elizabethan Non-Dramatic Literature. A study of Elizabethan prose 
and poetry (exclusive of the drama) from the appearance of 
Totters 'Miscellany' (1557) to 102"), with special emphasis on 
Spenser and Bacon. Associate Professor Reynolds. 
Firsl and Second semesters, T. Th., at 11:00. 

♦Resigned. Resignation to be effective August I, l!H(>. 



( }k \di \ ti School 27 

52. The Drama. The study of the drama from the beginning of (-he 

Elizabethan period to the end of the eighteenth century. Asso- 
ciate Professor Stephenson. 
First and Second semesters, M. W. F., at 11:00. 

53. Shakspere. About thirty representative plays of the Elizabethan 

period are studied, with emphasis on Shakspere's plays. Associate 
Professor Stephenson. 
First semester, M. W. F., at 10:00. 

54. ESighteenth Century Problems. A reading of Leslie Stephen's 

'English Thought in the Eighteenth Century' and the discussion 
of some of the questions. Professor Howe. 
First and Second semesters, two hours each week. 

55. Nineteenth Century Thought. In this course are considered the 

more important questions of the nineteenth century with the 
object of showing how they have been reflected in the literature 
of the century. Professor Sembower. 
First and Second semesters, T. Th., at 10:00. 

56. The Art of Poetry. Studies in criticism. The meaning of poetic 

thought; poetic answers to great questions; the relation of poetry 
to other modes of thought and expression. Specific illustration 
from a collection of verse and from the work of some one great 
poetic thinker. The course does not deal, except incidentally, 
with the subject of metrics. Associate Professor Rice. 
Second semester, M. W. P.", at 11:00. 

57. Literary Criticism. A study of the history and principles of literary 

criticism. Lectures on Aristotle, Plato, and the Elizabethan 
critics; reading in Sidney, Jonson, Dryden, Addison, and the 
chief critics of the nineteenth century. Writing of short pieces of 
criticism. Professor Howe. 
First semester, T. Th., at 9:00. ' 

59. Social Forces in English Literature. A study of the most important 

English writers with the purpose of discovering the social ideas 
of the authors and their times. Professor Howe. 
Second semester, T. Th., at 9:00. 

60. Composition Seminary. A course in writing restricted to those who 

have passed English 15 with distinction. Professor Sembower. 
First and Second semesters, T. Th., at 11:00. 

Dante (Fine Arts 7). Lectures, accompanied by reading of English 

translation. Professor Brooks. 
First and Second semesters, T. Th., at 11:00. 

61. American Literature. Special studies in American writers. Professor 

Sembower. 
Second semester, M. W. F., at 11:00. 
English 6 is a prerequisite for this course. 



28 Indiana University 



DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY 

James A. Woodburn, Professor of American Historj', 
Samuel B. Harding, Professor of European History. 
Albert L. Kohlmeier, Assistant Professor of History. 
James G. McDonald, Assistant Professor of History. 
Logan Esarey, Instructor in Western History. 

The Department is prepared for research work leading to the 
A.M. and Ph.D. degrees in the following fields: American colonial 
history; the American Civil War and Reconstruction, and the 
history of American political parties; English history in the 
seventeenth and nineteenth centuries; the French Revolution; 
American diplomatic history; the history of Indiana. 

Candidates for the Ph.D. degree with History as major subject 
will be examined in each of the following fields: (l) Ancient 
History, with emphasis at the option of the candidate on either 
Greek or Roman history; (2) Medieval and Modern History, with 
emphasis on either the medieval or the modern field; (3) English 
History, with emphasis either on the period before 1603 or after 
that date; and (4) American History, with chief emphasis either 
on the period before 1783, or after that date. The examination 
on the special field of the thesis will naturally be more searching 
than elsewhere. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in this 
Department : 

G. English History to 160.3. Professor Harding. 
First and Second semesters, M. W. F., at 9:00. 

[7. English History since 1603. Professor Haeding. 
First and Second semesters, M. W. F., at 9:00.] 
Omitted in 1916-17. 

S. American Colonial History. Assistant Professor Kohlmeier. 
First and Second semesters, T. Th., at 8:00. 

9. Renaissance and Reformation (1300-1555). Professor Harding. 
First and Second semesters, T. Th., at 11:00. 

10. History of Modern Europe. From about- L750 to the present time. 

Assistant Professor KOHLMEIER. 
First and Second semesters, M. W. F., at- 11:01). 

[11. Greek History: Advanced Course. 

Firsl and Second semesters, at an hour to he appointed l 
Omitted in 1916-17. 



(Iuaduate School 29 

13. France in the Middle Ages. A study of the institutions of medieval 
France, and of the processes whereby the feudal type of govern- 
ment was transformed into the modern stall 1 . Lectures, collateral 
readings, and reports on assigned topics. Professor Harding. 

Firsl and Second semesters, T. Th., at 2:00. 

Ability to read French is a prerequisite. 

16. Historical Method. Professor Harding. 
First semester, T. Th., at 2:00. 

17. Historians and History Writing in the Nineteenth Century. Pro- 

fessors Harding and Woodburn. 
Second semester, T. Th., at 2:00. 

22. American Diplomatic History, 1776-1914. Assistant Professor 
Koiilmeier. 
First and Second semesters, T. Th., at 3:00. 

28a. Origin and Growth of the American Constitution. Professor Wood- 
burn. 
First semester, M. W. F., at 9:00. 

286. Causes and Results of the Civil War in America. Professor Wood- 
burn. 
Second semester, M. W. F., at 9:00. 

30. Development of the American West. Dr. Esarey. 
First and Second semesters, M. W. F., at 8:00. 

20,4. Seminary in English History. Individual research and conferences. 
Professor Harding. 
First and Second semesters, W., 4:00 to 5:30. 

20B. Seminary in Modern European History. Individual research and 
conferences. Assistant Professor McDonald. 
First and Second semesters, W., 4:00 to 5:30. 

20C Seminary in American History: American Parties, 1828-1850. 
Individual research and conferences. Professor Woodburn. 
First and Second semesters, M., 4:00 to 5:30. 

2DD. Seminary in Indiana History. In 1916-17 the period from 1850 to 
1860 will be studied. The University library contains numerous 
files of papers covering this period and a large number of pamphlets 
and memoirs. Topics will be studied intensively and theses 
prepared. All seminary papers in this course must be type- 
written and ready to print. Full bibliographies are required. 
Professor Woodburn and Dr. Esarey. 
First and Second semesters, at hours to be arranged. 

40. The Editing and Printing of Papers and Monographs. A practical 
course without University credit. Professor Harding. 
First semester, M., at 7:00 p.m. 

Intended primarily for graduate students of History, but open to 
students of otner departments. 



30 Indiana University 



DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Amos S. Hershey, Professor of Political Science and International 

Law. 
Frank G. Bates, Associate Professor of Political Science. 
John A. Lapp, Lecturer on Social Legislation. 
Ernest M. Linton, Instructor in Political Science 

The following courses are open to graduate students in this 
Department : 

5. Municipal Government. Associate Professor Bates. 
First semester, M. W. F., at 10:00. 

6. The American Party System. Professor Hershey. 
Second semester, M. W. F., at 10:00. 

7. Principles of Legislation. Associate Professor Bates and Mr. Lapp. 
First semester, M. W. F., at 9:00. 

Given in alternate years with Course 8. 

[8. Principles of Administration. Associate Professor Bat^s 
First semester, M. W. F., at 9:00. 
Given in alternate years with Course 7.] 
Omitted in 1916-17. May be expected in 1917-18. 

9. Social Politics. Associate Professor Bates. 
Second semester, M. W. F., at 9:00. 

11. Political Theory. Dr. Linton. 

First and Second semesters, T. Th., at 11:00. 

13. International Relations. Professor Hershey. 
First and Second semesters, M. W. F., at 11:00. 

15. Public International Law. Professor Hershey. 
First and Second semesters, T. Th., at 1:00. 

10. Training for Public Service. Associate Professor Bates and Mr. 
Lapp. 
First and Second semesters. Hours and credit by arrangement. 

21. Seminary: Practical Problems of Government. Preliminary work in 

the discovery and use of sources, followed by individual work in 
research in practical questions; e.g. administration of public 
charities; the office of public prosecutor, and administrative 
functions of the courts. Associate Professor Bates. 
First and Second semesters. Hours and credit by arrangement. 

22. Seminary in [international Law and Diplomacy. Individual research 

work. The study of important topics in international law and 
international relations, as for example, the Moroccan question; 
Belgian neutrality; f':e relations between China and Japan. 
Professor HebSHEY. 
first and Second semesters. At hours to be appointed. 



Graduate School 31 



DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS AND SOCIOLOGY 

Ulysses (i. Weatherly, Professor of Economics and Sociology. 

William A. Rawles, Professor of Political Economy. 

Frank T Stockton, Assistant Professor of Economics and Sociology. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the 
Department : 

3a. Public Finance. Assistant Professor Stockton. 
First semester, M. W. F., at 8:00. 

36. Special Tax Problems. Assistant Professor Stockton. 
Second semester, M. W. F., at 8:00. 

9. Transportation. Professor Rawles. 
Second semester, M. W. F., at 9:00. 

28. Insurance. Professor Rawles. 
Second semester, T. Th., at 9:00. 

16. Tariff History of the United States. Professor . 

Summer session, daily, at 10:00. 

5. History of Economic Thought. Assistant Professor Stockton. 
First semester, M. W. F., at 11:00. 

12. Labor Organization. Assistant Professor Stockton. 
Second semester, M. W. F., at 11:00. 

20a. Descriptive Sociology: Social Evolution. Professor Weatherly. 
First semester, T. Th., at 10:00. 

206. Descriptive Sociology: Social Assimilation. Professor Weatherly. 
Second semester, T. Th., at 10:00. 



4a. Social Pathology: Poverty and Charities. Professor Weatherly. 
First semester, M. W. F., at 10:00. 

46. Social Pathology: Crime and Penology. Professor Weatherly. 
Second semester, M. W. F., at 10:00. 

10a. Socialism. Professor Weatherly. 
First semester, T. Th., at 11:00. 

106. Methods of Social Reform. Professor Weatherly. 
Second semester, T. Th., at 11:00. 

la. Principles of Sociology: Social Forces. Professor Weatherly. 
First semester, M. W. F., at 11:00. 

76. Principles of Sociology: Social Efficiency. Professor Weatherly. 
Second semester, M. W. F., at 11:00. 

30. Graduate Seminary. Individual research of an advanced character. 

Professor Weatherly. 
First and Second semesters, T., at 2:00. 
Open only to graduates or students who have done two semesters' 

work in Course 8 (see bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts). 



32 Indiana Universtiy 



DEPARTMENT OF JOURNALISM 

Joseph W. Piercy, Professor. 

Joseph A. Wright, Assistant Professor. 

To students who have taken twenty hours of Journalism 
as a minor with a major subject in either English, History, Political 
Science, Philosophy, or Economics, the Department offers one 
year of graduate work leading to the degree A.M. At least 
sixteen hours of work in Journalism are required, the other fourteen 
hours to be arranged for in consultation with the head of the 
Department. It is contemplated that a thesis shall be an import- 
ant part of the year's work, and shall receive five hours of credit 
out of the sixteen. The subject of the thesis will deal either with 
some phase or field of country journalism, or with some special 
work in city journalism, the specialization being related, if deemed 
best, to the student's major subject when an undergraduate. 

2. Practical Work on The Daily Student. Editorial work exclusively. 
Three hours' credit. Assistant Professor Wright. 
First and Second semesters, daily, at hours to be arranged. 

7. Current Events and Editorial Writing. Professor Piercy. 
First and Second semesters, T. Th., at 4:00. 

11. Newspaper Feature and Magazine Writing. Professor Piercy. 
First and Second semesters, T., 3:00 to 4:50. 

20. Seminary. Professor Piercy. 

First and Second semesters. Consultation hours to be arranged. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY 

Ernkst If. Lindley, Professor of Philosophy and Psychology. 
William L. Bryan, Lecturer on Ethics. 
William B. Klkin, Acting Professor of Philosophy. 
♦Melvin E. Eaggerty, Associate Professor of Psychology, and Direc- 
tor of the Psychological Laboratory. 

[In L915-16 Dr. John W. Todd was Acting Professor of Educational Psychology 
and Director of the Psychological Laboratory during Professor Baggebty's ab- 
sence.] 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the 
Deparl men1 : 

35. Modern Idealism. Acting Professor Elkix. 

Firs! and Second semesters, T. Th., at 10:00. 
♦Resigned, February L5, L916. 



Graduate School 33 

[36. Advanced Logic and Methods of Science. Acting Professor Elkin. 
First semester, two hours once a week, at a period to be arranged.] 
Omitted in 1916-17. 

5. Advanced Psychology. Professor Lindley or Acting Professor Elkin. 
Second semester, at hours to be arranged. 

[7. Comparative Psychology. 

First semester, M. W. F., at 11:00.] 
Omitted in 1916-17. » 

30. Seminary in Applied Psychology. Professor Lindley. 
First and Second semesters, two hours a week. 

34. Psychological Seminary. Professor Lindley. 
First and Second semesters, two hours a week. 

8. Psychological Research. Work arranged with individual students. 
Professor Lindley. 
First and Second semesters, at hours to be arranged. 



DEPARTMENT OF FINE ARTS 

Alfred M. Brooks, Professor. 
Robert E. Burke, Assistant Professor. 

The following courses in the Department of Fine Arts may 
count as graduate work on the Master's degree. For a full de- 
scription see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under 
the heading Liberal Arts in the University Catalog. 

1. Engraving and Etching. Professor Brooks. 
First and Second semesters, M. W. F., at 10:00. 

2a. History of Ancient Architecture. Professor Brooks. 
First semester, daily, at 9:00. 

2b. History of Medieval Architecture. Professor Brooks. 
Second semester, daily, at 9:00. 

3a. Sculpture. Professor Brooks. 
First semester, T. Th., at 10:00. 

36. Sculpture. Professor Brooks. 
Second semester, T. Th., at 10:00. 

7. Dante. Professor Brooks. 

First and Second semesters, T. Th., at 11:00. 

10. Nineteenth Century Art Criticism. Assistant Professor Burke. 
First and Second semesters, one evening a week. 



34 Indiana University 



DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

Schuyler C. Davisson, Professor. 
David A. Rothrock, Professor. 
Ulysses S. Hanna, Associate Professor. 
Kenneth P. Williams, Assistant Professor. 

The graduate courses at present offered by the Department 
lead to the A.M. and Ph.D. degrees. 

A student wishing to secure the Doctor's degree with Mathe- 
matics as major subject must, early in his graduate career, desig- 
nate one of the following main divisions of Mathematics as his 
specially chosen field: (1) Arithmetic and Algebra; (2) Calculus 
and Theory of Functions; (3) Geometry; (4) Applied Mathe- 
matics. In his specially chosen field, the candidate must present 
an acceptable thesis, showing an original treatment and giving 
evidence of original research, and be examined in three of the 
fields enumerated above. 

The library of the Department, consisting of about 2,500 bound 
volumes, is located in Room 36, Wylie Hall. The library is open 
from 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m., for use by students pursuing ad- 
vanced work in Mathematics. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the 
Department: 

21. Theory of Functions. Professor Rothrock. 
First and Second semesters, two hours a week. 

[39. Theory of Groups of Substitutions. Associate Professor Hanna. 
First and Second semesters, two hours a week.] 
Omitted 1916-17. 

[30. Differential Geometry. Professor Davisson. 

First and Second semesters, three hours a week.] 
Omitted in 1916-17. 

IY2. Theory of Numbers. Associate Professor Hanna. 
First semester, two hours a week. 

[31. Encyclopedia of Elementary Mathematics. Professor Rothrock. 
First semester, three hours per week. 
Open also to undergraduates.] 
Omitted in 1910-17. 

[44. Non-Euclidean Geometry. Professor Davisson. 
Open also to undergraduates.] 
Omitted in 1910-17. 



Graduate School 35 

[66. Point Sets and Functions of a Real Variable. Assistant Professor 

Williams. 
First and Second semesters, two hours.] 
Omitted in 1916-17. 

[57. Mathematical Analysis. Assistant Professor Williams. 
First and Second semesters, three hours per week.] 
Omitted in 1916-17. 

26. Projective Geometry. Professor Davisson. 

First and Second semesters, two hours per week. 
Open also to undergraduates. 

34. Higher Algebra. Assistant Professor Williams. 
First and Second semesters, three hours per week. 

20. Mathematical Reading and Research. Professors Davisson and 
Rothrock, Associate Professor Hanna, and Assistant Professor 
Williams. 
Hours and credit to be arranged. 

[45. Calculus of Variations. Professor Rothrock. 

First and Second semesters, three hours per week.] 
Omitted in 1916-17. 



DEPARTMENT OF ASTRONOMY 

Wilbur A. Cogshall, Associate Professor of Astronomy. 

Graduate work in this Department is partially provided for by 
the Lawrence Fellowship in Astronomy, mentioned under that 
heading in this bulletin. Other work of a graduate nature carried 
on at the University is included under the courses described below. 

For a description of Kirkwood Observatory and its equipment 
see University Catalog, or bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts. 

14. Orbits of Spectroscopic Binaries. Associate Professor Cogshall. 
Second semester, the day and hours to be appointed. 

13. Astronomical Research. A limited number of students will be per- 
mitted to undertake research work under the supervision of the 
Department. The equipment is best suited for work in astronomy 
of precision and celestial photography. Associate Professor 
Cogshall. 
First and Second semesters, hours and credit arranged with each 
student. 



36 Indiana University 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS 

Arthur L. Foley, Professor. 
Rolla R. Ramsey, Associate Professor. 
John B. Dutcher, Associate Professor. 
Fred A. Molby, Assistant Professor. 

The graduate courses offered by the Department lead to the 
A.M. and Ph.D. degrees. 

The courses comprising the work of the first three years (thirty 
hours) in Physics, also courses in photography, general laboratory 
work, the teaching of physics and physical manipulation, modern 
physics, and analytical mechanics (altogether forty-two hours), 
will be found listed in the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, 
or in the University Catalog. The following courses are open to 
graduate students, and to such undergraduates as may be prepared 
to take them: 

16. Spectroscopy. Advanced course. Associate Professor Ramsey. 
First and Second semesters, T. Th., at 2:00. 

18. Applied Electricity and Dynamo-Electric Machinery. Combined 
text and laboratory course. Associate Professor Ramsey. 
First semester, M. W. F., at 1:00. 

20. Electric Waves. A combined text and laboratory course. Associate 
Professor Dutcher. 
Second semester, T. Th., at 2:00. 

22. The Conduction of Electricity thru Gases, Radio-activity, Electron 
Theory. Combined text and laboratory course. Associate Pro- 
fessor Ramsey. 
Second semester, M. W. F., at 2:00. 

29. Differential Equations in Physics. Application of mathematics to 
physical theories. Associate Professor Ramsey. 
First semester, M. W. F., at 8:00. 

31. Thermodynamics. Assistant Professor Molby. 
First semester, T. Th., at 8:00. 

33. Physical Optics. Associate Professor Dutcher. 
First and Second semesters, T. Th., at 0:00. 

y>~>. Advanced Mathematical Electricity. Associate Professor Ramsey. 

First and Second semesters, T. Th., at 0:00. 

'M. Currenl Physical Literature. Professor Foley. 

First and Second semesters, T. Th., at 10:00. 



Graduate School 37 

:!!>. Advanced Theoretical Physics. A critical study of standard ti, -.ises 
and memoirs. Professor Pole? and Associate Professor Kams:;y. 
First and Second semesters, T. Th., at 11:00. 

K). Advanced Laboratory Methods and Research. Professor Foley 
and Associate Professor Ramsey. 
Firsl and Second semesters, at hours to be appointed. 

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

Robert E. Lyons, Professor. 
Louis S. Davis, Professor. 
*Oliver W. Brown, Associate Professor. 
Frank C. Mathers, Associate Professor. 
Clarence E. May, Associate Professor. 

[In 1915-1G George C. Halk was Instructor, and had charge of Professor Brown's 
work . ] 

Special attention is given to inorganic, organic, physiological, 
and physical chemistry and to electrochemistry, technical analyti- 
cal chemistry, and electrometallurgy. 

The graduate work of the Department, leading to the A.M. and 
Ph.D. degrees", comprises advanced laboratory, lecture, library, 
and seminary work in the lines indicated above, and special grad- 
uate courses described below. A thesis embodying original investi- 
gation is required for an advanced degree. 

The laboratories for advanced work and the departmental 
library are open from 8:00 a.m. to 4:50 p.m. There are no classes 
in the laboratories; each student works independently. 

19. Physical Chemistry. Laboratory work. Associate Professor Brown. 
First and Second semesters, at hours to be appointed. Laboratory 
open daily, 8:00 to 4:50. 

22. Electrochemistry. Associate Professor Brown and Mr. . 

Second semester, lectures (A), M. W., at 8:00; laboratory (B), 
T. Th. F., 1:00 to 4:50. 

15. Advanced Technical and Engineering Analysis. Laboratory work. 
Associate Professor Mathers. 
Second semester, at hours to be arranged. Laboratory open daily, 
8:00 to 4:50. 

32. Gas and Fuel Analysis. Two-hour course. Lectures and laboratory 
work. Associate Professor Mathers. 
Second semester, lectures (A), T., at 1:00; laboratory work (B), 
at hours to be appointed. 

*Absent on leave from August 1, 1915, to August 1, 1916. 



I 

38 Indiana University 

33. Spectrum Analysis and Sugar Analysis. Two-hour course. Lectures 
and laboratory work. Associate Professor Mathers. 
First semester, first thirteen weeks, lectures (A), F., at 1:00; labor- 
atory work (B), at hours to be appointed. 

26. Chemical Engineering. Lectures and reports. Three-hour course. 
Associate Professor Brown. 
First semester, lectures and reports, M. W. F., at 11:00. Credit, 
three hours. 

14. Seminary. Reports on current literature and special topics. (1) 
Inorganic Chemistry. Associate Professor Mathers. (2) Or- 
ganic Chemistry. Professor Lyons and Associate Professor May. 
(3) Electrochemistry and Industrial Chemistry. Associate 
Professor Brown. 
First and Second semesters, Th., at 7:00 p.m. 

50. Research: Organic or Physiological Chemistry. Professor Lyons 

or Associate Professor May. 
First and Second semesters, daily, 8:00 to 4:50. 

51. Research: Chemistry of the Alkaloids. Professor Davis. 
First and Second semesters, daily, 8:00 to 4:50. 

52. Research: Electrochemistry, Electrometallurgy, and Physical Chem- 

istry. Associate Professor Brown. 
First and Second semesters, daily, 8:00 to 4:50. 

53. Research: Inorganic Chemistry. Associate Professor Mathers. 
First and Second semesters, daily, 8:00 to 4:50. 

24. Advanced Electrochemistry and Electrometallurgy. (A) Lectures on 

the design and operation of commercial electric furnaces and on 
electric furnace processes and products. (B) Advanced laboratory 
work and research in pure and applied electrochemistry and 
electrometallurgy, including investigations in electric furnace work, 
refining and extraction of metals, electrosynthesis of organic and 
inorganic compounds, manufacture of storage batteries, and of 
industrial electrochemical processes. Associate Professor Brown. 

First and Second semesters, laboratory open daily, 8:00 to 4:50; 
lectures, at hours to be appointed. 

Students in this course are recommended to take Physics 18. 

25. Advanced Organic; Chemistry. A continuation of Course 6. (.4) 

Lectures and recitations on selected chapters of organic chemistry. 

(B) Laboratory work or research in synthetic or analytical organic 

chemistry. Associate Professor May. 
Firsl semester, lectures (A), T. Th., at 11:00; First and Second 

semesters, laboratory (B), at hours to be appointed. 
Presupposes Courses and 7. 

13. Elementary Metallurgy arid Assaying. Three-hour course. Asso- 
ciate Professor Brown and Mr. . 

First semester, Lectures (A), M. W., at 8:00; laboratory open, F., 
8:00 to 4:50. 



Graduate School 39 

*_ )( .). Storage Batteries. Associate Professor Brown. 

First semester, lectures, F., at 8:00; laboratory work one or more 
periods per week. 

31. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. Laboratory work. The preparation 
and study of the properties and reactions of the different com- 
pounds of the rare and uncommon elements, followed by research. 
This includes a review of the literature relating to the element 
that is being studied. Associate Professor Mathers. 
First and Second semesters, laboratory open daily, 8:00 to 4:50. 
Hours to be arranged. 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY 

Edgar R. Cumings, Professor. 
Joshua W. Beede, Associate Professor. 
Jesse J. Galloway, Instructor. 

The Department of Geology offers work leading to the A.M. 
and Ph.D. degrees. Opportunity is afforded for advanced work 
and investigation in stratigraphic geology and paleontology, and 
in economic and geographic geology. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the 
Department: 

3. Economic Geology. A discussion of the non-metallic materials, 

such as clay, cement, coal, oil and gas, building stones, etc. Asso- 
ciate Professor Beede. 
Second semester, daily, at 8:00. 

o. Systematic Paleontology. Laboratory study of fossil invertebrates. 
Dr. Galloway. 
First and Second semesters, two to five hours, at times to be ar- 
ranged. 

4. Evolution. A study of the geologic factors in evolution; the origin 

of the oldest faunas; age of the earth, etc. Professor Cumings. 
Second semester, T. Th., at an hour to be appointed. 

10. Research. Investigation of geological and paleontological prob- 
lems. A careful report on each investigation is required, in proper 
form for publication. Professor Cumings, Associate Professor 
Beede, Dr. Galloway. 
First and Second semesters, daily, 9:00 to 4:50. 

13. Advanced Field Work. Continuous work in the field for a month 
or more in the summer, fall, or spring. This course will usually 
form part of the research work submitted for an advanced degree. 
The work must be largely independent, but will always be under 
the general oversight of a member of the Department. 



40 Indiana University 

14. Stratigraphic Geology. A study of the literature of the various 
geologic systems. The history of their investigation, and the 
present knowledge of their divisions, distribution, faunas, and 
paleogeography will be fully considered. Professor Cumings. 
First and Second semesters, lectures, M. F., at 9:00. 



DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY 

David M. Mottier, Professor. 

Frank M. Andrews, Associate Professor. 

James M. Van Hook, Assistant Professor. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the 
Department : 

4. Morphology of Fungi. Assistant Professor Van Hook. 
First and Second semesters, daily, 1 :00 to 2 :50. 

5. Physiology. Associate Professor Andrews. 
First and Second semesters, daily. 

6. Cytology. Professor Mottier. 
First and Second semesters, daily. 

5 A. Research in Physiology. Special studies will be offered to those pur- 
suing work for advanced degrees. Associate Professor Andrews. 
First and Second semesters, daily. 

7. Research in Morphology and Cytology. Problems for special in- 

vestigation in morphology and cytology will be assigned to students 
who are prepared to undertake original work. Ability to read 
French and German is assumed. Professor Mottier. 
First and Second semesters, daily. 

13. Morphology of the Algae. A study of the life history and of tlie 
development of vegetative and reproductive organs in certain 
algae. The work is confined very largely to fresh-water forms. 
Professor MOTTIER. 
First and Second semesters, daily. 

18. Investigations in Mycology and Plant Pathology. Assistant Pro- 
fessor Van Hook. 
First and Second semesters, daily, 1:00 to 2:50. 



( Iraim vvk School 41 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY 

Carl II. Eigenmann, Professor, and Director of the Biological Station " 
FBRNANDUS Pom:. Associate Professor. 
W'n.i. Scott, Assistant Professor. 
Mildred A. Hoge, Instructor. 

All work of the Department during the summer is done at the 
Biological Station, Winona Lake, Indiana. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the 
Department : 

30. Advanced Zoology. Professor Eigenmann, Associate Professor 

Payne, Assistant Professor Scott, and Dr. Hoge. 
First and Second semesters, daily, 8:00 to 3:50. 

31. General Biological Problems. Professor Eigenmann. 
Second semester, M. W. F., at 9:00. 

32. Genetics. Dr. Hoge. 
Second semester, Th., at 9:00. 

50. Seminary. Weekly meetings of advanced students and instructors to 
discuss current literature and report on investigations in prog- 
ress. Associate Professor Payne. 
First and Second semesters, M., at 4:00. 

60. Research. Special investigation of zoological problems with a re- 
port on each investigation. Subjects of immediate interest in the 
Department are faunal and systematic studies of fresh-water 
fishes, cytology, limnology, and experimental zoology. Professor 
Eigenmann, Associate Professor Payne, Assistant Professor 
Scott, and Dr. Hoge. 



DEPARTMENT OF ANATOMY 

Burton D. Myers, Professor. 

Jacob A. Badertscher, Assistant Professor. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the 
Department: 

13. Research Work. Opportunity for research work is offered to ad- 
vanced students who may have at least one-half their time for 
one year free for the work. Professor Myers, and Assistant Pro- 
fessor Badertscher. 
First and Second semesters, at hours to be appointed. 

15. Advanced Course in Anatomy. Open to students who have com- 
pleted the dissection of the human body and Course 8. Professor 
Myers and Assistant Professor Badertscher. 
First and Second semesters, at hours to be appointed. 



42 Indiana University 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOLOGY 

William J. Moenkhaus, Professor. 
Clarence E. Edmondson, Instructor. 

Facilities for research leading to the higher degrees are avail- 
able within restricted lines in general physiology. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the 
Department : 

6. Advanced Physiology. A comprehensive experimental study of 
some restricted phase of mammalian physiology or of general 
physiology. Laboratory work and assigned reading. Professor 
Moenhkaus and Dr. Edmondson. 

First and Second semesters, daily, at hours to be arranged. 

Open to students who have passed in Courses 1 and 3, or in Courses 
4 and 5. 

10. Research. Problem work in certain phases of general physiology. 

Professor Moenkhaus. 
First and Second semesters, daily, 8:00 to 3:50. 
Open only to advanced students. 

11. Seminary. Professor Moenkhaus. 

I< irst and Second semesters, at hours to be arranged. 



Graduate School 43 



William \V. Black, Dean, and Professor of Elementary Education. 
•Henri Lesteb Smith, Dean-elect, and Prof essor of School Administration. 
fWiLLiAM F. Book, Professor of Educational Psychology. 

Robert -I. Leonard, Professor of Vocational Education. 

John \Y. Todd, Acting Professor of Educational Psychology. 

Hubert (1. Childs, Associate Professor of Secondary Education. 
JMelyix E. Haggerty, Associate Professor of Educational Psychology. 

William A. Myers, Lecturer on School Administration. 

Graduate work is offered in the School of Education, and 
special programs leading to the A.M. and Ph.D. degrees, with the 
Master's and Doctor's certificates in Education, will be arranged 
on application. 

A student whose undergraduate major was in the College of 
Liberal Arts will usually be given opportunity to do in one year 
the work for the A.M. degree in Education. The work will include 
such undergraduate courses in Education as may be necessary as 
a basis for the graduate work. 

The courses of the summer sessions are so arranged that 
graduate students in Education may complete the work for the 
Master's degree in summer sessions. 

Graduate students in Education may, by special arrangement, 
complete the work for two-thirds of a semester in the Summer 
session of 1916 by remaining until August 25. 

COURSES IN EDUCATION 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the 
School: 

6. History of Education. Associate Professor Childs. 
First and Second semesters, T. Th., at 8:00. 

10. Philosophy of Education. Professor Black. 
First and Second semesters, M. W. F., at 8:00. 

11. Principles of Organization and Supervision. Professor Black. 
First and Second semesters, T. Th., at 10:00. 

*Dean Black, who for the past four years has been in charge of the school, has 
resigned his administrative duties and henceforth will give his whole time to work of 
research and instruction. Piofessor Smith, formerly Superintendent of the Bloom- 
ington schools and Professor of School Administration in the University, and more 
recently Assistant Superintendent of the Minneapolis (Minn.) schools, becomes Dean 
of the School with the opening of the academic year, 1916-17. 

t Absent on leave during the year 1915-16. 

^Resigned, February 15, 1916. 



44 Indiana University 



15. School Administration. Mr. Myers. 

First and Second semesters, T. Th., 7:00 to 8:lo p.m. 

16. Experimental Psychology. Acting Professor Todd. 
Second semester, M. W. F., 1:00 to 3:50. 

17a. Mental Development. Given in conjunction with Philosophy 33. 
Acting Professor Todd. 
First semester, M. W. F., at 11:00.. 

176. Psychology of Learning and of Work. Given in conjunction with 
Philosophy 40. Acting Professor Todd. 
Second semester, M. W. F., at 11:00. 

9. Orthogenics. Acting Professor Todd. 

First and Second semesters, at hours to be arranged. 

19. Rural Education. Professor Black. 
First semester, M. W. F., at 9:00. 

20. The Theory and Administration of Vocational Education. Professor 

Leonard. 
First and Second semesters, M. W. F., at 8:00. 

21. Vocational Guidance. Professor Leonard. 
First and Second semesters, T. Th., at 8:00. 

22. Occupational Surveys. Professor Leonard. 
First and Second semesters, M. W. F., at 9:00. 

16/?. Seminary in School Administration. 
First semester, T., at 4:00. 

16C. Seminary in Elementary Education. Professor Black. 
First semester, M., at 7:00 p.m. 

16/). Seminary in Secondary Education. Associate Professor Childs. 
First semester, T., at 7:00 p.m. 

18. Research in Education. Given during the First and Second se- 
mesters. 

18B. Research in School Administration. 
18C. Research in Elementary Education. Professor Black. 
lS/>. Research in Secondary Education. Associate Professor 

( Jhilds. 
ISA'. Research in Educational Psychology. Acting Professor 

Todd. 
IS/''. Research in Vocational Education. Professor LEONARD. 



(iw.wHjATE School 45 



DEPARTMENT OF HOME ECONOMICS 

Mabel T. Wellman, Associate Professor. 
Elizabeth Sage, Assistant Professor. 
Prances L. Swain, Assistant Professor. 

To carry graduate work in this Department, students must 
have completed the equivalent of twenty hours of work in this 
subject, or must make up the deficiency. The character of the 
advanced work may be varied according to the needs of the student 
and may deal with the scientific, the economic, the sociological, or 
the artistic aspects of the subject. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the 
Department: 

4. Applied Design. Assistant Professor Sage. 

First semester, T. Th., 8:00 to 9:50; repeated in Second semester, 
T. Th., 1:00 to 2:50. 

5. History of Costume and Costume Design. Assistant Professor Sage. 
First semester, daily, 10:00 to 11:50. 

14a. Dietetics and Food Chemistry. Associate Professor Wellman. 
First semester, M. W. F., 8:00 to 9:50. 

146. Dietetics and Food Chemistry. Associate Professor Wellman. 
Second semester, M. W. F., 8:00 to 9:50. 

16a. Foods III. Assistant Professor Swain. 
First semester, T. Th., 1:00 to 2:50. 
Open to students who have completed Course 14. 

166. Foods III. Assistant Professor Swain. 
Second semester, T. Th., 1:00 to 2:50. 

25. Evolution of the Home. Historic development of the home; the 

family as a social institution; the house as an expression of family 
needs; a study of the modern family. Associate Professor Well- 
man. 
First and Second semesters, M. W. F., at 10:00. 

26. Economics of the Family. Division of income; a study of the factors 

in the cost of living; family budgets. Assistant Professor Swain. 
First and Second semesters, T. Th., at 9:00. 

27. Research. Special problems. 

First and Second semesters, at hours to be arranged. 

28. Seminary. 

First and Second semesters, at hours to be arranged. 



Students Registered in the Graduate School, 

1915-16 



^^The following list includes all graduate students who were in attendance in 
the Summer session of 1915, and the First and Second semesters of 1915-16. These 
sessions are indicated by "s", "1", "2", respectively. A star prefixed to the year of 
graduation indicates that the student completed his A.B. work at the end of the 
First semester and was enrolled in the Graduate School at the beginning of the Second 
semester, altho the A.B. diploma will not be conferred until the Commencement of 
1916. 

Anderson, Fred Norman (s) History French Lick. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1913; A.M., 1915. 

Anderson, Jean Juessen (1) German Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1911. 

Atkinson, Dayton Clifford (s) Physics Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 

Atkinson (Mrs.) Zella Wiseman (s) English Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1909; A.M., 1912. 

Baker, John Lewis (2) Economics Bloomington. 

A.B.. Miami University, 1904; LL.B., Indiana University, 1910. 

Baker, Charles Ike (2) Economics Troy. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914. 

Ballinger, Jessie Flae (s) Botany Upland. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1913. 

Barbour, Helen (1) Home Economics. . Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914. 

Barnes, Arlie Ray (1,2) Anatomy Paris Crossing. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 

Barr, Arvil Sylvester (s) History Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915; A.M., 1915. 

Bays, John Andrew (s) Education Rockport. 

A.B., Wabash College, 1908. 

Beebe, Ralph Edwin (s,l,2) English Warsaw. 

A.B., Winona College, 1913. 

Bartley, Helen Fay (1) English Oaktown. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914. 

Bell, (Mrs.) Gertrude Sumption (2). . .Philosophy Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, *1916. 

Bennett, Orval (s) Political Science.. . Marion. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 

Bentley (Mrs.) Bonnie; Morbley (2) . . . .History New Albany. 

AH., Indiana University, *1916. 

Bergdoll, Mary (s) English Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana university, L914. 

Bittner (Mrs.) Adda YVohler ( 1,2) Sociology Bloomington. 

A.B., Rockford College, 1907. 

Blank, Ralph John (1,2) History Wosl, Newton. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 

Blew, Michael James (s,l,2) Chemistry Wabash. 

A.M., Indiana University, 1915. 

(46) 



Graduate School 



47 



Blue, Thomas Grover (1,2) Chemistry Carmi, 111. 

A.B.. [ndlana University, 1915. 

Bohannon, William Everett (1,2) Education Bloomington. 

B.S., Southern Normal College, L904; A. is., Indiana University, 1915. 

Booth. Charles Edward (1,2) Education Valparaiso. 

\ B., Valparaiso University, 1914; B.S., 1915. 

Brand. Carl Fremonl (s,l,2) History Greenfield. 

A.M., Indiana University, 1915. 



Brengle, Fred Ernest (1) History. 

LB., Central Normal College, 1914. 

Bryan. Maude Esther (1) Latin. . . 

A.B.. Indiana University, 1914. 

Buley, Roscoe Carlyle (1) History. 

A.B.. Indiana University, 1914. 

Burke, Artie Eden (s) 

A.B., Indiana University, 

Burton, Edith L (1,2) 

A.B., Western Colleg< 



History . 



Elletsville. 
Bloomington. 
Bloomington. 
Bloomington. 



Latin Sanborn. 



for Women, 1911. 



Buskirk, Allen Van (2) 

A.B., Indiana University, 



English. 



Bloomington. 



Carlock, Royal Hubert (1) Economics Paris Crossing. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 

Gamble, Christopher Columbus (s) Education Clayton. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1910. 

Carriek, Leo Lehr (s) Chemistry Bloomington. 

M.S., Valparaiso University, 1911. 
A.M., Indiana University, 1915. 

Cassell, Lucile Helen (s) Home Economics. . Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1911. 

Childs, (Mrs.) Laura Goff (s,l,2) English Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 

Cockrane, John Colbert (1,2) History Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 



Cockrum, Barrett William (s) . . . 
A.B., Indiana University, 1914. 



Chemistry. 



Coleman, Faith (1,2) English, 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 



.Bloomington. 
.Bloomington. 
Bloomington. 



Coleman, James Melville (s,l,2) Philosophy. . . 

A.M., University of Michigan, 1892. 

Colvin, Ruth (1,2) Botany Flora. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914. 

Cowan, James Maxwell (1,2) English Dickson, Tenn. 

A.B., Vanderbilt University, 1914. 

Cook, Charles Edmund (s) Education Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1913. 



Coryell, Horace Noble (1,2) 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914; A.M. 

Conrad, William Atlee (s) 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 

Crampton, Charles J (s,l) 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914. 

Cromwell, Ray Riseley (s) 

A.B., Indiana University, 1912. 



. Geology 

1915. 



Bloomington. 

Astronomy Decatur. 

Philosophy Bloomington. 

Education Clay City. 



48 



Indiana University 



Davidson, Samuel Frank (1,2) English Coatesville. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1913. 



Salem. 



Davis, Edgar Clarence (1,2) Anatomy. . . . 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 

Day, Elbert Eldon (s) Education Bunker Hill. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1910. 

Dickey, Anna (s) History West Baden. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 

Dilla, Geraldine Princess (2) English Waterloo. 

A.B., University of Michigan, 1911. 

Dostal, Bernard Francis (1,2) Physics Milwaukee, Wis. 

A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1914; A.M., Indiana University, 1915. 



Edmondson, (Mrs.) Edna Hatfield (1,2). Sociology Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1911; A.M., 1914. 

Elfers, Edna Maud (1) English Rising Sun. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 

Ellis, Thomas Finley (1) Sociology Valparaiso. 

A.B., Valparaiso University, 1914; B.S., 1912; Pg.B., 1913. 



Empson, Mattie (1,2) 

A.B., Butler College, 1912. 



Latin . 



Brownstown. 



Foote, Helen Christine (s) English 

A.B., Indiana University, 1912. 



Indianapolis. 



Gifford, Robert Earl (s) Education Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 

Goldsmith, William Marion (1,2) Zoology Oakland City. 

A.B., Hillsdale College, 1913; B.Pe., Missouri State Normal, 1909. 
A.M., Indiana University, 1915. 



Goss, (Mrs.) Alice Diven (1,2) German 

A.B., Indiana University, 1908; A.M., 1912. 



Green, Myrtle Mae (1,2) 

A.B., Hanover College, 1907. 

Griffey, Harvey Francis (s,l,2)... 
A.B., Indiana University, 1910. 

Grossnickle, Russell (1,2) 

A.B., Manchester College, 1915. 



Bloomington. 

English Hanover. 

Education Bloomington. 

Mathematics North Manchester. 



Hansford, Hazel Irene (s,l,2)... 
A.B., Indiana University, 1913. 



Psychology . 



I [ale, George ( !lyde (s) Chemistry. 

A. B., [ndiana University, 1915; A.M., 1915. 



Bloomington. 
Bloomington. 



Harmon, Paul Montgomery (1,2) Physiology Bloomington. 

A.B., [ndiana University, 1914; A.M., L915. 



Ec 



tmics Bloomington. 



Hanna, Hubert HerscheU (1) 

A.B., [ndiana University, 1914. 

Hart, Agues Pay (1) Latin Bloomington. 

A. l'>., [ndiana I rniversity, [914. 

Harvey, Ruth Ada (1,2) English Dunreith. 

A r. ., Earlham ('oWcuc, [909. 

Hepburn, Samuel Benedict (1,2) History Bloomington. 

A.l'.., [ndiana University, [915. 

Mess, John Ambrose (1,2) German Bloomington. 

A.l',., Inivcrsity of Kansas, [908; A.M., 1910. 



G ka duate School 



49 



Hieger, Ruth (1,2) 

U.S.. Earlham CoUege, L91 t. 



Mathematics Richmond. 

Columbia City. 



Hire, Charles {'2) Physics 

AH.. Indiana University, l ( J15. 

I [ightower, Pleasant Roscoe (2) English Littles. 

A..B., Indiana Central University, 1914. 

Hoffman, Daphne Margarita (1,2) Romance Lang. . . .Bloomington. 

A.l?.. Indiana University, 1912; A.M., 1913. 

Holloway, -James Blaine (s) Education Bloomington. 

\ II., Indiana University, 1915. 



Holtzman, Louise Alice (s) English. 

A.B.. Indiana University, 1907. 



Stinesville. 
Bloomington. 



Hopkins, Garf Metcalf (s,l,2) Education.... 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914. 

Hufford, Mason Edward (s,l,2) Physics Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1911; A.M., 1912. 



Hutchinson. -James Emory (2) 

A.B.. Indiana University, *1916. 

Hutchinson, Nathaniel F (s) Education 

A.B., Indiana University, 1911. 

Hutchinson, Robert Orland (s) Physics. . . 

A.B.. Indiana University, 1914. 



Zoology Norman Station. 

... Huntingburg. 
. . .Norman Station. 



Ikerd, Helen Virginia (s) Education. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914. 



Bloomington. 



Keek, John Hamilton (1,2) 

A.B., Indiana University, 1911. 



Geology . 



Bloomington. 



Kineaid, Mav Martha (2) Romance Lang. . . Indianapolis. 

A.B., Butler College, 1913; A.M., Indiana University, 1914. 



Knapp, Ethel Marjorie (1,2) English. 

A.B., Wooster College, 1903. 



Bloomington. 



Kratlie, William Francis (1) Education Knox. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1909. 

Krause, Arthur Charles (s,l,2) Economics Michigan City. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 



Kroft, Margaret Ruth (2) 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 

Kunschik, Paul (s) 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914. 



English . 
German. 



Indianapolis. 
. Bloomington. 



Laudeman, Walter Arthur (1,2) Chemistry. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 

Laughlin, Butler (s) Education. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914. 



Leas, James Blaine (s) 

A.B., Indiana University, 1908. 

Leible, Arthur Blank (1,2) 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 

Line, Talitha Eleanor (s) 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914. 

Lines, Emory Earl (s) 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 



Education. 
Chemistry. 
.Zoology. . . 
Economics 



. Bremen. 
. Robinson. 
Eaton. 
Indianapolis. 
. Marion. 
Connersville. 



50 Indiana University 

Long, Arthur Theodore (s) Education Indianapolis. 

A.B., University of Illinois, 1908. 

Lucas, Henry Stephen (1) History Bloomington. 

A.B., Olivet College, 1913, A.M., 
Indiana University, 1915. 

Luce, Leonard Monroe (s) Mathematics McCordsville. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1906. 

McCaughn, James Zwingle Alexander (s) .E ducation Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1885. 

McElhinney, Robert Stewart (1,2) English Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1912; A.M., 1915. 

McEwan, (Mrs.) Eula Davis (s) Geology Earl Park. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1913; A.M., 1914. 

Mcintosh, Daniel C (s) Education Worthington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914. 

Malott, Clyde Arnett (s,l,2) Geology Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1913; A.M., 1915. 

Mann, Clarence Edward (s) Political Science.. . Morristown. 

B.S., Central Normal College, 1909; A.B., 1914. 

Martin, Eleanor Jane (1,2) English Corydon. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 

Masters, John Volney (s) History Greencastle. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1908. 

Maxwell, Ruth Redfern (1) Romance Lang. . . .Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1907; A.M., 1914. 

McCollough, Maebeth (2) History Williamsport. 

A.B., Indiana University, *1916. 

Menk, Edgar Allen (s,l,2) Latin Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1907. 

Miles, Ruth (1,2) German Syracuse. 

A.B., Butler College, 1915. 

Miller, Isaiah Leslie (1,2) Mathematics Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 

Money, Charles H (2) History Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, *1916. 

Nickels, Harvey Michael (s) Education Brazil. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 

Nicholson, Thomas Edward (s,l,2) Psychology Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 

Niemann, Lillian Charlol te (s) German Irvington. 

A.B., Indiana, University, L915. 



Odell, ( Jharles Wallers (s) Education Lafayette. 

A.M., Del'auvv University, 1911. 

Osborn, Clifford Haehl (s) English ShelbyvihY. 

AH., Indiana University, 19 15; A.M., 1915. 

Overman, Lucinda Belle (s) Home Economics. . Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, L913. 

Peek, Louise Brooks (s) Home Economics. . Washington. 

AH., Del'auvv University. 

Pence, Raymond Vanover (1,2) English Swayzeo. 

\. B., Indiana i rniversity, L91 5. 

Peterson, Harriet Margaret (s) English Delphi. 

A. H., Indiana University, L915; A.M., L915. 



Graduate School 51 

Pflueger, Luther Appel (s) German Bloomington. 

\ i; . Muhlenberg College, L906; A.M., Indiana University, 1913. 

Pieroy, Joseph William (s) English Bloomington. 

A. li . D.l'auw University, 1 • ) 1 3 . 

Pittenger, I Mrs.) Bess Fern Williams (2) History Bloomington. 

LB., Indiana University, 1914. 

Polk. Onicr Eli (2) Education Valparaiso. 

Pg.B., Valparaiso University, 1912; A.B., Indiana University, *1916. 

1 Vidian!. Walter (s. 1.2) History Edinburg. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914; A.M., 1915. 

KeitT. Cecil Kater (s) Political Science.. .North Manchester 

A.I?.. Indiana University, 1915. 

Rice, Emmett Ainsworth (2) History Spencer. 

A.B.. Indiana University, *1916. 

Rhorer. Melvin Hoover (1) Economics Bloomington. 

AH.. Indiana University, 1915. 

Richard, B. Frederick (1,2) Chemistry Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University. 1915. 

Rigg, Mary (s,l,2) Home Ecoiiomics. .Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 

Robinson, James Jaques (s) Education Princeton. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914. 

Rogers, Aaron Milton (s) Chemistry Bloomington. 

A.B.. Indiana University, 1915. 

Sanders, Lillie Lucile (1) German Orleans. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1912. 

Savers, Ephraim Vern (s) Education Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914. 

Schiller, Lacey Lee (1,2) Anatomy Waynetown. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 

Scoles, Sabin Le Roy (s) Philosophy Wakamsa. 

A.B., Winona College, 1913. 

Scribner, (Mrs.) Josephine Pittman (s).Home Economics. .Bloomington. 
A.B., Indiana University, 1890. 

Shekell, Oliver Morton (s) Education Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1913. 

Sherrill, Binford Wilson (s) Education Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1912. 

Small, (Mrs.) Rose McFall (1,2) English Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana State Normal School, 1915. 

Smith, Carrie May (s) German New Albany. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 

Smith, Howard Clifton (s) Political Science.. . Oshkosh, Wis. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1913; A.M., 1914. 

Spencer, Thomas Dewitt (s) Mathematics Switz City. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1911. 

Stempel, (Mrs.) Myrtle Emmert (1,2) . .Comp. Phil Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1902; A.M., 1915. 

Stephens, Mabel Elizabeth (1,2) English Marion. 

A.B., Indiana University, *1916. 

Stewart, Berney Roscoe (s) Physics Madison, Wis. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 

Stone, Calvin Perry (s,l) Philosophy Bryant. 

B.S., Valparaiso, 1910; A.B., 1913. 



52 



Indiana University 



Strack, William N (1,2) Economics, 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 

Stuart, Elmer Henry (s) Chemistry. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914; A.M., 1915. 

Stull, James Grant (s) Education. 

LL.B., Indiana University, 1901. 



Sturdevant, Earl Grover (s,l,2). 
A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 



Chemistry, 



Bloomington. 
Frankfort. 
Bloomington. 
Salem. 
. Greentown. 



Summers, Grover (1,2) History 

A.B., Indiana State Normal School, 1912. 

Swartz, Walter Johann (1,2) Chicago, 111. 

A.B., William Jewell College, 1912; A.M., University of Chicago, 1913. 



Swindler, James Albert (s) 

A.B., Indiana University, 1913. 



Physics . 



Bloomington. 



Swinney, Claude Mathews (s,l) Ecomonics Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 



Tarter, Elmer Ellsworth (s) Education Salem. 

A.B., University of Kentucky, 1913. 

Telfer, Robert Stoekdale (s) English Bloomington. 

A.B., Wesleyan University, 1913. 

Telfer, William Adams (s,2) English Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1910; LL.B., 1910. 



Teller, Raymond (2) English. . . 

A.B., Indiana University, 1911. 

Thompson, (Mrs.) Katherine Mathers 

(1,2) Education 

A.B., Indiana University, 1910. 

Toelle, Howard (s) History . . . 

A.B., Indiana University, 1913. 

Thompson, Hiner J (2) English. . . 

A.B.. Indiana University, *1916. 



Tucker, William Motier (s,l,2). 
A.B., Indiana University, 1908; 

Tucker, Glenn Forest (s) 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914. 

Tudor, Jennie Delia (s) 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 

Town send, Ray Wiston (s) 

A.B., Butler College, 1915. 

Tull, Pauline (1,2) 

A.B., Hanover College, 1914. 

Twining, Simon Ercile (2) 



A.M. 



. Geology . . . 
1909. 

. Physics . . . 
. English . . . 
. Education. 
. English. . . 



Economics. 



I'll. 15., Notre Dame, 1913; A.M., Indiana University, 1911. 



Bloomington. 

Bloomington. 
Elnora. 
Bloomington. 
Osgood. 
, Georgetown. 
. Bloomington. 
. Matthews. 
. Hanover, 
.Bloomington. 



Voris, Clarence R (s) 

A. 15., Eanover College, L914. 

Voris, Harrison Scott (s) 

A.B., Eanover college. 



Chemistry . 



Ed ucation , 



Madison. 



Madison. 



Warren, Don Ca moron (1,2) 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914. 

Watson, Carl Swartney (s) 

A.B., [ndlana University, 1914. 

Weatherwax, Lewis Estel (1,2) Education Bloomington. 

A.B., [ndlana University. 1910. 



Zoology . 

. Physics 



Saratoga. 

W. Lafayette. 



Graduate School 



53 



Wratllcrwax. Paul (1,2)... 
AH., Indiana l'ni\ ersitj . 



914 



Botany, 

A.M., L915. 



Bloomington. 
Goshen. 



\\fa\ er, (Mrs.) Elenora Kauffman (1, 2) History 

\ n.. Goshen College i<n;<. 

Weaver, John E (1,2) Mathematics Goshen. 

A.B.. Goshen College, 1913. 

Wellons, Ralph Dillingham (s) Education Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914. 

Weybright, Eva Marie (s) Home Economics. .Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914. 



White. Roy Lewis (s) 

A.B., Indiana University, 191. 



Education. 



Bloomington. 



White, Ceeile Woodard (s,2) Philosophy Anderson. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1913; A.M., 1915. 



Wilder, Clem (1) 

AH., Indiana University, 1915. 

Wise, Clayton Ray (1,2) 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 



. History . . . 

. Education . 

English . . . . 



. Bloomington. 
. Bloomington. 
North Manchester. 



Wolfe, Louise Agnes (1,2) 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 

Woodburn, James Gelston (1,2) Mathematics Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 



Woods, John Hall (s) 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914. 

Wright, Emerson Blaine (s,2) . . . 
A.B., Indiana University, 1913. 



Education , 
Botany. . . 



Princeton. 
Bloomington. 



Van Auken, Clarice (1) 

A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1909. 



German . 



Bloomington. 



Zaring, Ivan Armon (s) 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 

Zeigler, Lloyd Hiram (1) 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914. 



Philosophy . 
Philosophy. 



Zimmerman, Charles (s,l) History. 

A.B., Indiana State Normal School. 



Salem. 



Bippus. 



North Vernon. 



SUMMARY 

Enrolled in Summer session, 1915 _. 98 

Enrolled in Eirst semester, 1915-16 91 

Enrolled in Second semester, 1915 16 99 

Total enrollments 288 

Deduct names enrolled in more than one session 96 



Net total 192 






Is 







-/iv 






Vol. XV\ 
No. 6 / 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

(OFFICIAL SERIES) 



May I 
1917 



Entered as second-class mail matter January 28, 1916, at the post office at Bloomington, 
Indiana, under the Act of August 24, 1912. Published monthly, January, February, 
March, August, October, and December, and semi-monthly, April to June, inclusive, by Ind- 
iana University, from the University Office, Bloomington, Ind. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

GRADUATE SCHOOL 




KJiVaSiT i bois u: 

JAI 



Announcements, 191 7-1 8 



1917 


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Session days of First and Second semesters in bold faced figures. Days of Summer 


session 1917 (except special schedules of the School of Education and of the School of 


Law), are in italic. 



University Calendar 



SUMMER SESSION, 1917 



June 14, Thursday. 

June 15, Friday. 

August 10, Friday, 5:00 'p.m. 



Registration and enrollment in classes. 
Recitations and lectures begin. 
Summer session ends. 



***Special Schedules of the School of Education. — Courses for Class A and 
Class B teachers begin Monday, June 11, and end Friday, August 24. Classes 
are held on the following Saturdays: July 14, 21, August 4, 11, 18. Research course? 
run from the opening of the Summer session until August 24. 

School of Law. — Courses begin June 11 and end August 24. After July 23, in- 
struction is given six days a week. 

Biological Station (at Winona Lake, Ind.). — Opens Saturday, June 16, and 
closes Friday, August 17. First half closes July 20, and second half begins July 14. 



REGULAR SESSION, 1917-18 



First Semester 



Sept. 17 and 18, Monday and Tuesday. 

September 18, Tuesday. 
September 19, Wednesday. 
Nov. 29 and 30, Thursday and Friday. 
December 21 to January 2. 
January 3, Thursday, 8:00 a.m. 
January 21, Monday. 
January 25, Friday. 
February 1, Friday, 5:00 p.m. 



Matriculation and registration; ex- 
aminations for admission. 
Enrollment in classes. 
Recitations and lectures begin. 
Thanksgiving recess. 
Christmas recess. 
Work resumed. 
Foundation Day: a holiday. 
Final examinations begin. 
First semester ends. 



Second Semester 



Feb. 1,2,4, Fri., Sat., Mon. 
February 4, Monday. 
February 5, Tuesday. 
February 22, Friday. 
March 28, Thursday, 12m. 
April 2, Tuesday, 8:00 a.m. 
May 30, Thursday. 
May 31, Friday. 
June 8, Saturday, 5:00 p.m. 
June 12, Wednesday. 



Matriculation and registration. 

Enrollment in classes. 

Recitations and lectures begin. 

Washington's Birthday: a holiday. 

Easter vacation begins. 

Work resumed. 

Memorial Day: a holiday. 

Final examinations begin. 

Second semester ends. 

Commencement. 



(3) 



Contents 



PAGE 

Prefatory Note 6 

Officers and Faculty of the Graduate School 7 

The Graduate School — 
General Statement- 
Purpose and Administration 10 

Admission 10 

The Library 10 

Fees 11 

Degrees — 

Master of Arts 11 

Master of Science 12 

Doctor of Philosophy 12 

Application for Degrees 13 

Fellowships — 

University Fellowships 13 

Lawrence Fellowship in Astronomy 13 

Special Fellowships 14 

Scholarships for Graduates of other Indiana Colleges 14 

Special Rules concerning Fellows and Scholars 14 

Waterman institute for Scientific Research 14 

Departments and Courses of Instruction, 1917-18 — 
The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences — 

Anatomy 16 

Astronomy « 16 

Botany 16 

Chemistry 17 

Comparative Philology 18 

Economics and Sociology 19 

English 19 

Fine Arts 20 

Geology 21 

German 21 

Greek 22 

History 22 

Home Economics 23 

Journalism 24 

Latin 24 

Mathematics 26 

(4) 



Contents 5 

The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences Continued. page 

Philosophy 27 

Physics 28 

Physiology 28 

Political Science 29 

Romance Languages 29 

Social Service 30 

Zoology 30 

School of Education 31 

Register of Graduate Students, 1916-17 33 



Prefatory Note 



Indiana University is the State University of Indiana, and the head of 
the public school system of the State. It takes its origin from the State 
Seminary, which was established by act of the legislature, approved January 
20, 1820. In 1828 the title of the Seminary was changed by the legislature 
to that of the Indiana College, and in 1838 the University was given its 
present name. In 1867 Indiana University became coeducational. 

The University comprises the following schools : 

The College of Liberal Arts, founded as the Indiana Seminary in 1820. 
The School of Law, organized in 1842 and reorganized in 1889. 
The School of Medicine, organized in 1903, and reorganized in 1908. 
The Training School for Nurses, established in the fall of 1914. 
The Graduate School, organized in 1904. 
The School of Education, organized in 1908. 
The Extension Division, organized in 1912. 
The Summer Session, organized in 1890, reorganized in 1900. 

The first advanced degrees conferred for graduate work were granted 
in 1882. In 1904, there took place the segregation and formal organization 
of the Graduate School, and in 1908 the office of Dean of the Graduate School 
was created. 

This number of the Bulletin is devoted to setting forth the facilities for 
graduate work in the several departments of the University. The attention 
of graduates of other Indiana colleges is invited to the announcement on 
pagel4of ten scholarships established by the Board of Trustees for such 
students. The value of these scholarships is $200 each: they also carry with 
t hem exemption from Contingent, Library, and regular laboratory fees. For 
further information concerning the Graduate 1 School, address, 

The Dean of the Graduate School, 

Bloomington, ludrana. 



Mi, 



Officers and Faculty of the Graduate School 



COUNCIL 

*Carl II Eigenmann, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School, and Professor 

of ZoOlogy. 
Edgar Ros< ob Cumings, Ph.D., Acting Dean, and Professor of Geology. 
Robert Edward Lyons, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 
Arthur Lee Foley, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 
David Myers Motoer, Ph.D., Professor of Botany. 
Ulysses Grant Weatherly, Ph.D., Litt.D., Professor of Economics and 

Sociology. 
Ernest Hiram Lindley, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy and Psychology. 
Burton Dorr Myers, A.M., M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 
Samuel Bannister Harding, Ph.D., Professor of European History. 
Bert John Vos, Ph.D., Professor of German. 
David Andrew Rothrock, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 
William J Moenkhaus, Ph.D., Professor of Physiology. 
Alfred Mansfield Brooks, A.M., Professor of Fine Arts. 
Will David Howe, Ph.D., Professor of English. 
Selatie Edgar Stout, Ph.D., Professor of Latin. 

fessor of School Administration. 
Joseph William Piercy, A.B., Professor of Journalism. 
Henry Lester Smith, Ph.D., Dean of the School of Education, and Pro- 
George Davis Morris, Dr.d'U. (Paris), Associate Professor of French. 
Frank William Tilden, A.M., Associate Professor of Greek. 
Guido Hermann Stempel, A.M., Associate Professor of Comparative 

Philology. 
Wilbur Adelman Cogshall, A.M., Associate Professor of Astronomy. 
Frank Greene Bates, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Political Science, and 

Secretary of the Council. 

FACULTY OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

William Lowe Bryan, Ph.D., LL.D., President of the University. 

Horace Addison Hoffman, A.M., Professor of Greek. 

James Albert Woodburn, Ph.D., LL.D., Professor of American History. 
*Carl H Eigenmann, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology, and Director of the 
Biological Station. 

Robert Edward Lyons, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

A rthur Lee Foley, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 

David Myers Mottier, Ph.D., Professor of Botany. 
jAlbert Frederick Kuersteiner, Ph.D., Professor of Romance Languages. 

Ulysses Grant Weatherly, Ph.D., Litt.D., Professor of Economics and 
Sociology. 

Ernest Hiram Lindley, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy and Psychology. 



*Relieved of teaching duties from August 1. 1910, to August 1, 1917. 
I Vbsent on leave during academic year, 1910-17. 

(7) 



3 Indiana^University 

Burton Dorr Myers, A.M., M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

Samuel Bannister Harding, Ph.D., Professor of European History. 

Amos Shartle Hershey, Ph.D., Professor of Political Science and Inter- 
national Law. 

Bert John Vos, Ph.D., Professor of German. 

William A Rawles, Ph.D., Professor of Political Economy. 

Carl Wilhelm Ferdinand Osthaus, A.M., Professor of German. 

Schuyler Colfax Dayisson, Sc.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Dayid Andrew Rothrock, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

William J Moenkhaus, Ph.D., Professor of Physiology. 

Louis Sherman Davis, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Alfred Mansfield Brooks, A.M., Professor of Fine Arts. 

Will David Howl, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

William Wesley Black, A.M., Professor of Elementary Education. 

William Frederick Book, Ph.D., Professor of Educational Psychology. 

Charles Jacob Sembower, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Edgar Roscoe Cumings, Ph.D., Professor of Geology. 

Robert Josselyn Leonard, A.M., Professor of Vocational Education. 

Selatie Edgar Stout, Ph.D., Professor of Latin. 

William Baird Elkin, Ph.D., Acting Professor of Philosophy. 

Joseph William Piercy, A.B., Professor of Journalism. 

Henry Lester Smith, Ph.D., Professor of School Administration. 

G force Dayis Morris, Dr.d'U. (Paris), Associate Professor of French. 

Frank William Tilden, A.M., Associate Professor of Greek. 

Guido Hermann Stempel, A.M., Associate Professor of Comparative 
Philology. 

Charles Alfred Mosemiller, A.B., Associate Professor of Romance 
Languages. 

Kolla Roy Ramsey, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics. 

Oliver W Brown, A.M., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Frank Marion Andrews, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Botany. 

Lillian Gay Berry, A.M., Associate Professor of Latin. 

Henry Thew Stephenson, B.S., A.B., Associate Professor of English. 

Wilbur Adelman Cogshall, A.M., Associate Professor of Astronomy. 

Ulysses Sherman II anna, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Joshua William Beede, Ph.D., Associate I 'rofessor of Geology. 

Prank Greene Bates, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Political Science. 

Frank Curry Mathers, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Clarence Earl May, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Fernandus Payne, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Zoology. 

Mabel Thacher Wellman, A.B., Associate Professor of Home Economics. 

Edna Gertrude Henry, A.M., Director of Social Service (Indianapolis). 

1 1 ubert Guy Childs, A.M., Associate Professor o'' Education. 

.John BENJAMIN DuTCHER, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics. 
John Mill, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Spanish. 

George Fullmer Reynolds, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English. 

Preston Albert Barba, Ph.D., Associate Professor of German. 

WILLIAM NEWTON LOGAN, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Geology. 

Garland Greever, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English. 

I \l Van Nook, A.M., Assistant Prof essor of Botany. 



Gradi \ i 'E School 9 

Will Scott, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

Robert E Bi rke, A.M.. Assistant Professor of Pine Arts. 

Fred A Molby, Ph.D., Assistant Prof essor of Physics. 

Eliz mu in S \(,i.. U.S., Assistant. Professor of Home Economics. 

Prank Tennj ^ Sto< kton, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Economics and 

Sociology. 
Albert Ln>\\ u, Kohlmeier, A.M.. Assistant Professor of History. 
Ki \\i:iii Powers Williams, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 
.1 wii:> Groveb McDonald, A.M., Assistant Professor of History. 
Josepb Alexander Wright, A.B., Assistant Professor of Journalism. 
John Ambrose Hess, A.M., Assistant Professor of German. 
Pb \\k C SENOUR, A.M., Assistant Professor of English. 
• I lcob A Ba'dertscher, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Anatomy. 
Prances Lucy Swain, B.S.,A.M., Assistant Professor of Home Economics. 
John Augustus Lapp, Ph.B., Nonresident Lecturer on Social Legislation. 
Claren< i Edmund Edmondson, Ph.D., 1 nstructor in Physiology. 
Logan Esarey, Ph.D., Instructor in Western History. 
Will Taliaferro Hale, Ph.D., Instructor in English. 
Robert Withington, Ph.D., Instructor in English. 
Mildred Arbro Hoge, Ph.D., Instructor in Zoology. 
Tobias Daxtzig, Lie es Sc, Instructor in Mathematics. 
George Clyde Hale, A.M., Instructor in Chemistry. 



The Graduate School 



GENERAL STATEMENT 

Purpose and Administration. The Graduate School furnishes 
opportunities for advanced work leading to careers in higher education and 
in certain lines of investigation. It does not offer work leading to pro- 
fessional degrees in Law or in Medicine. 

The work of the School is a direct continuation of that of the College 
of Liberal Arts; and as such it is the most advanced work in education under- 
taken by the State. 

The School is administered by the Council of the Graduate School, com- 
posed of members of the Faculty representing different fields of learning. 

Admission. Students holding a Bachelor's degree in Arts, or in Science, 
from Indiana University, or the same degree, or its equivalent, from institu- 
tions of similar rank, are admitted to the Graduate School on presentation 
of satisfactory credentials, which should include a certificate of graduation 
and a transcript of the college record. Persons holding the Bachelor's degree 
from institutions whose requirements are considered to lack a year, or more, 
of being the equivalent of the A.B. degree from this institution, are not 
admitted to the Graduate School. They may enter the College of Liberal 
Arts, and are referred to the Dean of the College for their standing. Holders 
of the A.B. degree, or its equivalent, from institutions whose requirements 
lack less than a year of being the equivalent of the A.B. degree from this 
institution may be admitted to the Graduate School. In such cases, work 
in addition to the minimum of thirty hours for the A.M. degree will be re- 
quired. The amount will be determined in each case by the Council of the 
Graduate School. In all cases, the student must complete to the satisfac- 
tion of the department of the major subject the graduate work required in 
that department for the A.M. or the Ph.D. degree. 

All graduate students will enroll at the beginning of each semester, and 
those entering regularly organized classes will submit to the same regula- 
tions as undergraduate students. Work will in many cases be individual 
and not controlled by a recitation schedule. At the time of entrance to 
the Graduate School the student must submit a plan of the entire work he 
wishes to present for the Master's or Doctor's degree. This plan must be 
approved by I he professor of 1 he major subject and the Dean of the Graduate 
School. Graduate work done before filing such plan will ordinarily not be 
counted toward advanced degrees. 

The Library. The Library of Indiana, University at present contains 
over 115,000 cataloged volumes. The selection of these books has been 
made with a, view to facilitating instruction and research. The collection 
is a well balanced one, bu1 is especially strong in literary and scientific 
periodicals. The list of periodicals received and permanently kept on file 
by the library numbers about four hundred, and includes American, English, 

(10) 



Graduate School 11 

German, French, and, bo a less extent, Italian, Spanish, and Swedish publi- 
cations. The library is made thoroly usable by a- carefully prepared card 
catalog, l'.\ indexes, and by other bibliographical aids. 

In the library building are seminary rooms for the Departments of History, 
Economics and Sociology, Philosophy, German, Romance Languages, Latin, 
Greek, and Political Science. 

In addition to the central library, where the general literary and historical 
collections are housed, there are nine departmental collections, of varying 
si/.es, kept in the different University buildings. 

All books, with the exception of periodicals and books reserved for refer- 
ring, may be drawn for home use. Each student may draw books for two 
weeks, with privilege of renewal, but subject to recall. 

The library is open Monday to Friday, from 7:45 a.m. to 10:00 p.m., 
and on Saturdays from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 

Fees. Students who are legal residents of the State of Indiana are 
charged a Contingent fee of $9 a semester, and a Library fee of $1.50 a 
semester. These fees cover in part the cost of the physical maintenance of 
the University, and are not applied to the cost of tuition, which is provided 
wholly by the State. 

Students not legal residents of the State of Indiana will be charged a 
Contingent and Library fee amounting to $30 a semester. The Summer 
session fee is $15, irrespective of the length of the course, except for a half- 
term's work in law, where $10 is charged. 

The Laboratory fees in all courses are uniformly $1.50 per credit hour,* 
except in the School of Medicine, and for courses in domestic art. In the 
latter case the fee is $1 a semester. 

The Gymnasium fee, if the work in Physical Education is taken, is $1.50 
a semester. 

An Examination fee of $1 is charged for each make-up or special examina- 
tion. This fee is paid to the Bursar; his receipt, when presented to the 
proper instructor, constitutes the authorization for holding the examination. 

The fee for any Degree is $5, and must be paid to the Bursar at least 
thirty days before graduation. 

DEGREES 

Three advanced degrees, Master of Arts, Master of Science, and Doctor 
of Philosophy, are conferred by the University. 

Master of Arts. The degree Master of Arts may be conferred upon 
Bachelors of Arts of this University, or of any other institution of equivalent 
standing, or upon Bachelors of Science provided this degree is an alterna- 
tive equivalent o!' the A.B. degree, following a residence; at tin; University 
of a minimum of two semesters and the completion of a minimum of thirty 
hours of University credit ; and in addition the passing of an oral examination 
on the work taken for the degree, when required by the major department. 



*The Increased cost of chemicals and other laboratory supplies, owing to the 
European war, has necessitated an increase of about twenty-five per cent in the 
laboratory fees of the Department of Chemistry. 



12 Indiana University 

Credit earned in excess of that required for the A.B. or the B.S. degrees, 
before the degree is conferred or a certificate of the completion of the work 
for the degree is issued, is not counted toward the A.M. degree withoul 

special action of the Graduate Council before the work is done. 

Twenty of the total of thirty hours required for the A.M. degree must be 
in one department, or in closely allied departments. Ten hours must lie 
distinctly graduate in character. There is no restriction as to the amount 
of work that may be carried during any semester. 

The work for the A.M. degree may all be done in Summer sessions, pro- 
vided that the work for the degree be completed within five years. 

Professional studies are not accepted for the graduate degrees, but re- 
search work on professional subjects may be accepted for these degrees at 
the option of the professor in charge of the major subject. 

A thesis is required in all departments except in the departments of 
English and Latin. 

Freshman courses will not be counted on advanced degrees. 

The first ten hours in beginning French and German do not count on 
advanced degrees except by permission of the Graduate Council, on the 
written recommendation of the professor in charge of the major subject. 
The Council shall in such cases fix the amount of credit to be given. 
The amount of credit that a student may receive for elementary courses in 
other subjects is determined by the professor in charge of the major subject. 

It is strongly urged that all students gain some proficiency in foreign 
modern language before entering the Graduate School. Credit in ten 
hours in foreign modern language, or the certified equivalent, is required of 
candidates for the A.M. degree. If the candidate does not meet this require- 
ment before entering the Graduate School, he must obtain credit for ten 
hours of foreign language in addition to the regular thirty hours required for 
the A.M. degree, unless by special act of the Graduate Council partial credit 
is allowed for this work in accordance with the provisions noted in the pre- 
ceding paragraph. 

Masirr of Science. The degree Master of Science may be conferred 
upon Bachelors of Science of Indiana University under the same conditions 
upon which the degree of Master of Arts is conferred on Bachelors of Arts. 

Doctor of Philosophy. Tin- degree Doctor of Philosophy may be 
conferred upon graduates of this University, or of any institution of similar 
character and rank, upon the completion of an advanced course of study of 
not less t han t hree years. 

Each candidate for t his degree will select a- major subject consisting of the 
work of some one department or recognized subdivision of a department; 
and not less than two minors, ;it Least one of which must be in some depart- 
ment related to, but distinct from, that of t he major subject. 

The course for the degree will be pursued under the direction of a com- 
mittee consisting of I he heads of t he deparl ments in which the work is done. 
Its value will be determined by a final examination, and by the presentation 
of ;i satisfactory thesis. The thesis should usually embody original work 
upon some prescribed or accepted subject; it, must- always give evidence 
thai the candidate is capable of forming an independent judgment upon the 
recent literal lire of hi. deparl menl . 



( 1 r \Di aim-; School L3 

A detailed statement of the work offered for the degree, indorsed by the 
professor m charge of the major subject, must be submitted to the Council 
of i he Graduate School not later t han May 10 of the year in which the candi- 
date presents himself for examination. 

On the recommendation of the professor in charge of the" major subject, 
and with the concurrence of the Council of the Graduate School, part of the 
three years' study required for this degree may be spent in residence at other 
universities. 

The thesis of every candidate for the Doctor's degree shall be presented 
to the Council of the Graduate School on or before the first day of June of 
the year in which he is a candidate for the degree. The thesis must be in- 
dorsed by the head of the department as being in its final form, and ready for 
the press. If the candidate is recommended for the degree, arrangements 
must be made to deposit five printed copies of the thesis in the library. 

The examination of each candidate for this degree will be conducted by a 
committee consisting of all the instructors under whom graduate; work has 
been taken, in the presence of such members of the Faculty of the School as 
care to attend. 

At least one year before the final examination the candidate shall satisfy 
the professor in charge of the major subject of his ability to use French and 
German for purposes of investigation. 

Application for Degrees. Application for an advanced degree must 
be tiled with the Dean at the time of admission of the candidate to the 
Graduate School. Application for the Doctor's degree must be on file at 
least one year before the candidate is admitted to the examination. 

FELLOWSHIPS 

University Fellowships. A number of University fellowships are 
available for graduate students. These fellowships carry with them an 
honorarium of between $200 and $500 annually. The highest amount will 
ordinarily be paid only if the incumbent is appointed for a third year. A 
fellowship is a recognition of scholarship. A portion of the fellow's time 
may be required in the service of the department in which he is appointed. 
Appointments are for one year. 

Lawrence Fellowship in Astronomy. The Lawrence Fellowship 
of the Department of Astronomy has been established by Mr. Percival 
Lowell, of the Lowell Observatory, upon the following terms and conditions: 

1. The fellowship shall be known as the Lawrence Fellowship, in 
remembrance of the donor's mother, and is established in perpetuity, 
revocable, however, at any time at the will of the founder. 

2. It shall be annually available and shall cover the college calendar 
year, that is, from commencement to commencement of the same. 

3. The applicant shall be appointed by the Department, the donor 
reserving the right of finally passing upon the suitability of the candidate 
so presented. 

4. The fellow shall be given time and opportunity for an original 
thesis on some astronomical subject looking to the taking of a Master's 
degree, the nature of which shall be decided by the Director and the fel- 



14 Indiana University 

low. But the fellow shall be expected to give general assistance in the work 
of the Observatory during the period of his fellowship. 

5. The fellowship will pay $600 and the fellow's traveling expenses 
to and from the Observatory at Flagstaff, Ariz.; and a furnished room al 
the Observatory shall be free to the fellow's use. 

Special Fellowships. There are besides the fellowships mentioned 
above, three special fellowships ranging in value from $500 to $1,000. These 
fellowships are created only for men of exceptional ability and merit, who may 
or may not have received the Ph.D degree. 

Scholarships for Graduates of Other Indiana Colleges. The Trustees 
of Indiana University, at their March meeting, 1910, established ten graduate 
scholarships of an annual value of $200 each, to be held by graduates of other 
colleges in the State. In awarding these scholarships the policy is to assign 
them to the most promising students, irrespective of the special field of study 
in which they wish to work, or the particular institutions from which they 
come. As between cases of equal merit, however, attention is given to secur- 
ing a distribution of the awards among different departments of study and 
different colleges of the State. 

Applicants for these scholarships should file a statement of their educa- 
tional history and of their plans with the Dean of the Graduate School. 
They should indicate in this statement the major subject which they wish to 
pursue, and give a transcript of their college record. They should also 
present at this time recommendations from their instructors, and such other 
evidences of their fitness as they can offer. Applications will be received 
up to March 1 of each year. 

Applications are referred in each case to the department concerned for a 
decision upon the respective merits of the applicants in that department. 
On the basis of the departmental reports, the Graduate Council recommends 
to the Trustees the most eligible candidate for appointment. 

These scholarships are not open to students doing professional work in 
Law or in Medicine. 

For application blanks, and further information, address the Dean of the 
Graduate School. 

Special Rules Concerning Fellows and Scholars. Holders of fellow- 
ships and scholarships may be required to render some service to the 
University and are not permitted, without the special permission of the 
Graduate Council, to do other work for remuneration. 

All fellows and scholars are exempted from the payment of Contingent, 
Library, and regular Laboratory fees. 

\\ 4TERMAN INSTITUTE FOR SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH 

At a meeting of the Trustees of the University on May 12, L915, Dr. 
Luther Dana Waterman, Professor Emeritus of Medicine in the Indiana 
University School of Medicine, presented to the Trustees deeds for property 
amounting in vulue to $100,000, on the following conditions: 

1. Thai he shall retain the management and income from the property 
during his lifel ime. 



Graduate School 15 

2. Thai the proceeds from the properly he devoted 1o the establish- 
ment and permanent maintenance of an Institute for Scientific Research. 

3. That the Trustees bind themselves to appropriate annually an 
amount of monej for the Institute equal to the annual proceeds from the 
property. 

The Trustees accepted the proposal of Dr. Waterman in the following 
terms: "Resolved, That the generous gift of Dr. Luther D. Waterman to 
the University for the purpose therein stated be and is hereby accepted with 
the thanks of the Board. We hereby pledge the faith of the institution to 
carry out the conditions therein contained." 



Departments and Courses of Instruction, 
1917-18 



***In the following announcement of courses the Roman numerals I and II in- 
dicate whether a course is given in the First or Second semester, respectively. The 
letters a and b used in a course number indicate which half (or semester) of the year's 
work is being announced if the course is one which is givei thruout the University 
year. University credit is reckoned in semester hours, indicated in parentheses by 
the abbreviation "cr." 



DEPARTMENT OF ANATOMY 

Professor Myers; Assistant Professor Badertscher. 

The following are the courses open to graduate students in the De- 
partment : 

13. Research Work. Opportunity for research work is offered to advanced 
students who may have at least one-half their time for one year 
free for the work. I, II. Hours to be arranged. 

Mr. Myers, Mr. Badertscher. 

15. Advanced Course in Anatomy. Open to students who have completed 
the dissection of the human body and Course 8. I, II. Hours to 
be arranged. Mr. Myers, Mr. Badertscher. 

DEPARTMENT OF ASTRONOMY 

Associate Professor Cogshall 

Graduate work in this Department is partially provided for by the 
Lawrence Fellowship in Astronomy, mentioned under that heading in this 
bulletin. Other work of a graduate nature carried on at the University is 
included under the courses described below. 

For a description of Kirkwood Observatory and its equipment see the 
University Catalog. 

13. Astronomical Research. I, 1 1. Days, hours, and credit to be arranged. 

Mr. Cogshall. 

14. Orbits of Spectroscopic Binaries. II. Days, hours, and credit to be 

arranged. Mr. Cooshall. 

DEPARTMENT OF BOTAN1 

Professor Mottier; Associate Professor Andrews; Assistant Professor 

Y \\ Hook. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the Department: 

4. Morphology of Fungi. I. Daily, 1-3. (5 cr.) Repeated II. 

Mr. Van Hook. 

(16) 



( ! u am \ n: Scho< >L 17 

."). Plain Physiology. I. Daily, L-3. (5 cr.) Repeated II. 

Mr. Andrews* 

(). Cytology. I. Daily, L-3. (5 cr.) Mr. Mottier. 

.~).l. Research in Physiology. I, II. Days and hours to be arranged. 

Mr. Andrews, 

7. Research in Morphology and Cytology. Ability to read French and 
German is assumed. [, II. Daily, at hours to be arranged. 

Mr. Mottier. 

L3. Morphology of the Algae. I. II. Daily, at hours to be arranged. 

Mr. Mottier. 

IS. Investigations in Mycology and Plant Pathology. I, II. Daily, 1-3. 

Mr. Van Hook. 

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

Professors Lyons and Davis; Associate Professors Brown, Mathers,, and 
May; Instructor Hale; Tutor P apish. 

Special attention is given to inorganic, organic, physiological, and physical 
chemistry and to electrochemistry, technical analytical chemistry, and 
electrometallurgy. 

The graduate work of the Department, leading to the A.M. and Ph.D. 
degrees, comprises advanced laboratory, lecture, library, and seminary work 
in the lines indicated above, and special graduate courses described below. 
A thesis embodying original investigation is required for an advanced degree. 

The laboratories for advanced work and the departmental library are 
open from 8:00 a.m. t > 4:50 p.m. There are no classes in the laboratories: 
each student works independently. 

19. Physical Chemistry. Laboratory work. J, II. Laboratory open 

daily, 8-5. Hours to be arranged. Mr. Brown, Mr. Hale. 

22. Electrochemistry. II. Lectures (A), M.W., at S; laboratory (B), 
T.Th.F., 1-5. (22,1 , 2 cr. ; 22B, 1 or more cr.) Mr. Brown, Mr. Hale. 

15. Advanced Technical and Engineering Analysis. II. Laboratory open 
daily, 8-5. Hours to be arranged. Mr. Mathers. 

32. Gas and Fuel Analysis. II. Lectures ,(A), T., at 1; laboratory (/i), 

at hours to be arranged. (2 cr.) Mr. Mathers. 

33. Spectrum Analysis and Sugar Analysis. I (first thirteen weeks). 

Lectures (A), P., at 1; laboratory (B), at hours to he arranged. 
'(2 cr.) Mr. Mathers. 

20. Chemical Engineering. I. MAY. P.. at 11. Mr. Brown. 

11. Seminary: Inorganic Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, Electrochem- 
istry, and Industrial Chemistry, The Pending of Chemistry 
Literature from German Textbooks. I, II. Th., at 7 p.m. 
Air. Lyons, Mr. Brown, Mr. Mathers, Mr. May, Mr. Papish. 



18 Indiana University 

50. Research: Organic or Physiological Chemistry. I, II. Hours to be 

arranged. Mr. Lyons, Mr. May. 

51. Research: Chemistry of the Alkaloids. I, II. Hours to be arranged. 

Mr. Davis. 

52. Research: Electrochemistry, Electrometallurgy, and Physical Chemis- 

try. I, II. Hours to be arranged. Mr. Brown. 

53. Research: Inorganic Chemistry. I, II. Hours to be arranged. 

Mr. Mathers. 

24. Advanced Electrochemistry and Electrometallurgy. I, II. Lectures 

(A), F., at 8 (Second semester); laboratory (B), at hours to be ar- 
ranged. Mr. Brown. 

25. Advanced Organic Chemistry. I. II. Lectures (.4), T.Th., at 11 

(First semester) ; laboratory (B), at hours to be arranged. Mr. May. 

13. Elementary Metallury and Assaying. I. Lectures (A), M.W., at 
8; laboratory (B), open F., 8-5. (3 cr.) Mr. Brown, Mr. Hale. 

29. Storage Batteries. I. Lectures, F., at 8; laboratory, one or more 
periods a week. Mr. Brown. 

31. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. I, II. Laboratory open daily, 8-5. 
Hours to be arranged. Mr. Mathers. 

DEPARTMENT OF COMPARATIVE PHILOLOGY 

Associate Professor Stempel. 

The graduate courses offered below will 1 e extended as required. They 
may be supplemented by certain of the courses listed as undergraduate, as 
well as by certain courses given in the other language departments and in 
History, Sociology (Descriptive Sociology), Philosophy, and English. 

[5. Comparative Philology of the Classical Languages. I, II. M.W.F.] 
at an hour to be appointed. (6 cr.) Mr. Stempel.] 

Omitted in 1917-18. 

[4. Gothic. I, II. T.Th., at 11. (4 cr.) Mr. Stempel.] 

Omitted in 1917-18. Given in alternate years with 9. 

IS. Sanskrit. 1,11. M.W.F., at 10. (6 cr.) Mr. Stempel.] 

Omitted in l ( .)17-is. 

9. Old High German. 1,11. T.Th., at 11. (4 cr.) Mr. Stempel. 

[10. Middle High German. I, II. T.Th., at an hour to be appointed. 
(4 cr.) Mr. Stempel.] 

Omitted in 1917-18. 

[11. Old Icelandic. 1,11. M.W.F., at 9. (6 cr.) Mr. Stempel.! 

Omitted in 1917-18. 

15. Seminary in Historical English Grammar. I, II. W., 2-4. 

Mr. Stempel. 



Graduate School 1!) 

department <>l economics \m> sociology 

Professors WEATHERLY and Rawlbs; Assistant Professor Stockton. 

Following arc the courses open to graduate students in the Department: 

3a. Public Finance. I. M.W.F., at 8. (3 cr.) Mr. Stockton. 

36. Special Tax Problems. II. M.W.F., at 8. (3 cr.) Mr. Stockton. 

9. Transportation. II. M.W.F., at 9. (3 cr.) Mr. Rawles. 

28. Insurance. II. T.Th., at 9. (2 cr.) Mr. Rawles. 

5. History of Economic Thought. I. M.W.F., at li. (3 cr.) 

Mr. Stockton. 

12. Labor Organization. II. M.W.F., at 11. (3 cr.) Mr. Stockton. 

13. Rural Economics. I. T.Th., at 9. (2 cr.) Mr. Stockton. 

20. Descriptive Sociology, (a) Social Evolution, (6) Social Assimila- 
tion. I, II. T.Th., at 10. (4 cr.) Mr. Weatherly. 

4. Social Pathology, (a) Poverty and Charities. (6) Crime and 
Penology. I, II. M.W.F., at 10. (6 cr.) Mr. Weatherly. 

10a. Socialism. I. T.Th., at 11. (2 cr.) Mr. Weatherly. 

L06. Methods of Social Reform. II. T.Th., at 11. (2 cr.) 

Mr. Weatherly. 

7. Principles of Sociology, (a) Social Forces. (6) Social Efficiency. 
I, II. M.W.F.,atll. (6cr.) Mr. Weatherly. 

30. Graduate Seminary. I, II. At hours to be appointed. 

Mr. Weatherly. 

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

Professors Howe and Sembower; Associate Professors Stephenson, Rey- 
nolds, and Greever; Assistant Professor Senour; Instructors 
Hale and Withington. 

The Department is prepared to offer research work leading to the A.M. 
and Ph.D. degrees, in the following periods: Elizabethan literature, the 
literature of the seventeenth century, of the eighteenth century, and of the 
first half of the nineteenth century. 

For the A.M. degree, the candidate should have had in his undergraduate 
work the equivalent of thirty hours of English, and should, in his graduate 
work, pursue a course restricted to three subjects, approved by the Depart- 
ment of English. 

For the Ph.D. degree, the candidate will be expected to do at least two 
full years' work in residence after the Master's degree. He must be able 
to read German and French, and to do a piece of independent research which 
will be acceptable to the Department. 



20 Indiana University 

The following courses are open to graduate students in the Department: 

50. The Nineteenth Century Romantic Poets. I, II. Days and hours to 

be appointed. (4 cr.) Mr. Greever. 

51. Elizabethan Non-Dramatic Literature. I, II. T.Th., at 11. (4 cr.) 

Mr. Reynolds. 

52. The Drama. I, II. M.W.F., at 11. (6 cr.) Mr. Stephenson. 
5:5. Shakspere. I. M.W.F., at 10. (3 cr.) Mr. Stephenson. 

54. Eighteenth Century Problems. I, II. Two hours each week. (4 cr.) 

Mr. Howe. 

55. Nineteenth Century Thought, I, II. T.Th., at 10. (4 cr.) 

Mr. Sembower. 

56. The Art of Poetry. II. M.W.E., at 11. (3 cr.) Mr. Sembower. 

57. Literary Criticism. I. T.Th., at 9. (2 cr.) Mr. Greever. 

58. Browning. II. Days and hours to be appointed. (2 cr.) 

Mr. Reynolds. 

59. Social Forces in English Literature. II. T.Th., at 9. (2 cr.) 

Mr. Howe. 

60. Composition Seminary. I, II. T.Th., at 11. (4 cr.) 

Mr. WlTHINGTON. 

Dante (Fine Arts 7). I, II. T.Th., at 11. (4 cr.) Mr. Brooks. 

61. American Literature. II. Prerequisite, 0. Days and hours to be 

appointed. (2 cr.) Mr. Senour. 

62. Milton. I, II. T.Th., at 9. (4 cr.) Mr. Hale. 

DEPARTMENT OF FINE ARTS 

Professor Brooks; Assistant Professor Burke. 

The following courses in the Department of Fine Arts may count as 
graduate work on the Master's degree: 

1. Engraving and Etching. Lectures on the history and development, 

with special reference to the art of drawing. I. M.W.F., at 10. 
(3 cr.) Repeated II. Mr. Brooks. 

2. History of Architecture. Lectures, with collateral reading, (a) Creek 

and Roman, (6) Medieval and Renaissance. The Second semes- 
ter's work may be taken without the first half -year's work. 1,11. 
Daily, at 9. ( LOcr.) Mr. Brooks. 

3. Sculpture, (a) Creek and Roman. (6) Middle Ages and Renais- 

sance. The Second semester's work may be taken without the first 
half-year's work. 1,11. T.Th., at 10. (4 cr.) Mr. Brooks. 

7. Dante. Lectures on 'The New Life' and 'The Divine Comedy', ac- 
companied by the reading of both in English. I, II. T.Th., at 
II. (<\ cr.) Mr. Brooks. 



Graduate School 21 

10. Art Criticism. A seminary course in which the art criticism of Rey- 
nolds. Ruskin, Pater, Tolstoi, Coleridge, Symonds, Browning, 
and 1 1 a/lit t is studied. I, II. Days and hours to be arranged. 
(4 or.) - Mr. Burke. 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY 

Professor Cumings; Associate Professors Beede and Logan. 

Tlie Department of Geology offers work leading to the A.M. and Ph.D. 
degrees. Opportunity is afforded for advanced work and investigation in 
stratigraphic geology and paleontology, and in economic and geographic 
geology. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the Department : 

3. Economic Geology. T, II. M.W.F., at 8. (6 cr.) Mr. Logan. 

1. Evolution. 11. T.Th., at hours to be appointed. (2 cr.) 

Mr. Cumings. 

5. Systematic Paleontology. I, II. Days and credit to be arranged. 

Mr. Cumings. 

10. Research. I, II. Hours to be arranged. 

Mr. Cumings, Mr. Beede, Mr. Logan. 

13. Advanced Field Work: Geological Survey. Days, hours, and credit 
to be arranged. Mr. Beede, Mr. Logan. 

[14. Stratigraphic Geology. I, II. M.F., at 9. (4 cr.) Mr. CuMiN(is.| 

Omitted in 1917-18. 

11. Seminary. 1,11. M., at 4. (No credit.) 

Mr. Cumings, Mr. Beede, Mr. Logan. 

DEPARTMENT OF GERMAN 

Professors Vos and Osthaus; Associate Professor Barba; Assistant Pro- 
fessor Hess. 

The following courses are open to graduate students: 

14. German Usage. II. T.Th., at an hour to be appointed. (2 cr.) 

Mr. Hess. 

30. Studies in the Modern German Drama. I. M.W.F., at an hour to be 
appointed. (3 cr.) Mr. Osthaus. 

32. The German Novel and 'Novelle'. II. M.W.F., at an hour to be 
appointed. (3 cr.) Mr. Barba. 

28. Journal Club. I. Two hours weekly, at an hour to be appointed. 
(2 cr.) Mr. Vos. 

22. (J '-man Seminary. II. Two hours weekly, at an hour to be appointed. 
(2 cr.) Mr. Vos. 

27. Middle High German. I. Two hours weekly, at an hour to be ap- 
pointed. (2 cr.) Mr. Vos. 



22 Indiana University 

29. History of the German Language. II. Two hours weekly, at an 

hour to be appointed. (2 cr.) Mr. Vos. 

31. Research. I, II. Hours to be arranged. Mr. Vos. 



DEPARTMENT OF GREEK 

Professor Hoffman; Associate Professor Tilden. 

The time that may be at present profitably devoted to graduate work in 
Greek is one year, leading to the A.M. degree. A thesis on some subject 
connected with the seminary work of the year is required for the degree. 

All candidates for the A.M. degree with Greek as major subject are 
recommended to take at least ten hours in Latin, in advance of the Latin 
taken in the undergraduate study. 

Courses 9, 12, and 13, or any part of these courses, are also open as 
minors to graduate students who have not already had as part of their 
undergraduate study the work which they take in these courses for graduate 
credit. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the Department: 

9. Lyric and Dramatic Poetry. I, II. Daily, at hours to be appointed. 
(10 cr.) Mr. Tilden. 

12. Philosophical Prose. I, II. T.Th., at 10. (4cr.) Mr. Hoffman. 

[13. Historical and Rhetorical Prose, (a) Herodotus and Thucydides. 

(6) Demosthenes, 'On the Crown'. I, II. M.W.F., at hours to 

be appointed. (6 cr.) Mr. Tilden.] 
Omitted in 1917-18. 

15A. Graduate Seminary: Euripides. I, II. Th., at hours to be ap- 
pointed. (4cr.) Mr. Hoffman. 

15B. Graduate Seminary. Author studied to be selected. I, II. W., at 
hours to be appointed. (4 cr.) Mr. Tilden. 

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY 

Professors Woodburn and Harding; Assistant Professors Kohlmeier and 
McDonald; Instructor Esarey. 

Candidates for the Ph.D. degree with History as major subject will be 
examined in each of the following fields: (1) Ancient History, with emphasis 
at tin; option of the candidate on cither Greek or Roman history; (2) Medie- 
val and Modern History, with emphasis on either the medieval or the modern 
field; (3) English History, with emphasis either on the period before 1603 
or after that date; and (4) American History, with chief emphasis either 
on the period before 1 7<S:^>, or after that date. The examination on the 
special field of the thesis will naturally be more searching than elsewhere. 

following are the courses open to graduate students in this Department: 

(i. English Constitutional History. I, II. (6 cr.) M.W.F., at 9. 

Mr. Harding. 



( i raduate School 23 

8, American Colonial History. 1. II. T.Th., at 8. (4 cr.) 

Mr. KOHLMEIER. 

9. Renaissance and Reformation. I, II. T.Th., at 11. (4 cr.) 

Mr. Harding. 

10. Modern Europe. From about 1750 to the present time. I, II. 
M.W.K.. at 11. (6 cr.) Mr. Kohlmeier. 

\:\. France in the Middle Ages. Ability to read French is a prerequisite. 
I. 11. T.Th., at 3. (4cr.) Mr. Harding. 

10. Historical Method. I. T.Th., at 2. (2 cr.) Mr. Harding. 

17. Historians and History Writing in the Nineteenth Century. II. 
T.Th., at 2. (2 cr.) Mr. Harding, Mr. Woodburn. 

22. American Diplomatic History, 1776-1914. I, II. T.Th., at 3. 
(4 cr.) Mr. Kohlmeier. 

28. Origin and Growth of the American Constitution. I. M.W.F., 

at 9. (3cr.) Mr. Woodburn. 

29. Causes and Results of the Civil War in America. II. M.W.F., 

at 9. (3 cr.) Mr. Woodburn 

30. Development of the American West. I, II. M.W.F., at 8. (6 cr.) 

Mr. Esarey. 

20.4. Seminary in English History. I, II. W., 4-5:30. (Credit as 
arranged.) Mr. Harding. 

20B. Seminary in Modern European History. I, II. W., 4-5:30. (Credit 
a* arranged.) Mr. McDonald. 

20C. Seminary in American History. I, II. M., 4-5:30. (Credit as 
arranged.) Mr. Woodburn. 

20 Z). Seminary in Indiana History. I, II. At hours to be arranged. 
(Credit as arranged.) Mr. Woodburn, Mr. Esarey. 

DEPARTMENT OF HOME ECONOMICS 

Associate Professor Wellman; Assistant Professors Sage and Swain. 

To carry graduate work in this Department, students must have com- 
pleted tli«' equivalenl of twenty Injurs of work in this subject, or must make 
up the deficiency. The character of the advanced work may be varied 
according to the needs of the stud3nt and may deal with the scientific, the 
economic, the sociological, or the artistic aspects of the subject. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the Department: 

4. Applied Design. II. T.Th., 1-3. (2 cr.) Miss Sage. 

5. History of Costume and Costume Design. Prerequisite, Fine Arts 

14. 1. Daily, 10-12. (5 cr.) Miss Sage. 



24 Indiana University 

14. Dietetics and Food Chemistry. Prerequisites, 10 or 11, 12 (is prerequisite 
or parallel), Chemistry 3C. I, II. M.W.F., 8-10. (6 cr.) 

Miss Wellman. 

16. Foods III. Prerequisite, 14. I, II. T.Th., 10-12. (4 cr.) 

Miss Swain. 

25. Evolution of the Home. I, II. M.W.F., at 10. (6 cr.) Miss Wellman. 

26. Economics of the Family. I, II. T.Th., at 8. (4 cr.) Miss Swain. 

27. Seminary. Hours to be arranged. Miss Wellman. 

28. Research. Specia' problems. Hours to be arranged. 

29. Women and Children in the Textile Industries. I. Hours to be 

arranged. Miss Sage. 

DEPARTMENT OF JOURNALISM 

Professor Piercy; Assistant Professor Wright. 

To students who have taken twenty hours of Journalism as a minor with 
a major subject in either English, History, Political Science, Philosophy. 
or Economics, the Department offers one year of graduate work leading to 
the degree A.M. At least sixteen hours of work in Journalism are required, 
the other fourteen hours to be arranged for in consultation with the head of 
the Department. It is contemplated that a thesis shall be an important part 
of the year's work, and shall receive five hours of credit out of the sixteen. 
The subject of the thesis will deal either with some phase or field of country 
journalism, or with some special work in city journalism, the specialization 
being related, if deemed best, to the student's major subject when an under- 
graduate. 

2. Practical Newspaper Work (on the staff of 'The Indiana Daily Student'). 
Editorial work exclusively. [, II. Daily, at hours to be arranged. 
(6 cr.) Mr. Wright. 

11. Advanced Course in Newspaper and Magazine Writing. I. T., 3-5. 
(2 cr.) Repeated II. Mr. Piercy. 

20. Seminary. I, II. Consultation hours to be arranged. Mr. Piercy. 

DEPARTMENT OF LATIN 

Professor Stout; Associate Professor Berry. 

Students who begin the graduate study of Latin after having completed 
,ni undergraduate course in the subjecl equivalent to I ha1 required of a major 
in the Departmenl in Indiana University can complete the work for the 
Master's degree in one year. In special eases the work can all be done in 
ii in km r sessions. The writing of a thesis is nol required of all candidates for 
the Master's degree, but it is advised for those who expect- to take 
additional work looking to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. Thework 
required for the Master's degree, while affording an introduction to the 



Graduate School 25 

methods of investigation, is arranged primarily to give a wider and more' 
thoro acquaintance with the language and literature, institutions and his- 
tory of the Roman people. It is hoped that this will meet equally well 
the needs of those who wish to become better teachers of Latin in the high 
schools and the lower grades of the college course, and of those who desire a 
proper foundation for the more advanced study of Latin. 

The purely graduate courses at present offered, and those 1 to be added, 
will be given in a series such as to offer opportunity for a three years' course 
of graduate study. Candidates for the Ph.D. degree whose major subject 
of study is Latin are required to make Greek their principal minor subject. 
A wide range of choice will be allowed for the second minor subject, the only 
requirement being that such courses shall contribute in some definite way to 
the principal work of the candidate. Every library resource required for 
investigations assigned by the Department will be supplied if not at present 
in the library. 

The Junior and Senior reading courses (Courses 33, 35, 41, 42) 
of the undergraduate work may be taken for graduate credit if 
certain additional work of graduate character assigned by the instructor 
be done in connection with them. The authors read in these courses are varied 
in different years, and thru a three-year period afford graduat? students 
opportunity for a wide course of reading. 

31. History of Latin Literature. 1. T.Th., at 9. (2 cr.) Miss Berry. 

33. Junior Reading Course. An elective course, advised for all Latin 
majors who can arrange to take it. The authors and works read 
lie in fields of literature not adequately represented in other parts 
of the Latin course, (a) Cicero's Tusculan Disputations, Book 
i, with collateral reading from other writers who reflect Roman 
thought concerning the destiny of the soul. (6) Plautus. Pre- 
requisites, 11, 14, 25, 26. 1, IT. M.W.F., at 9. (6 cr.) 

Miss Berry. 

[35. Junior Reading Course. Alternates with 33 and is similar in aim. 
(a) Prose of the Empire, (b) Juvenal: Selected Satires. I, II. 
M.W.F., at 9. ((3 cr.) Miss Berry. 1 

Omitted in 1917-18. 

41. Senior Reading Course. An intensive study of one or more represen- 
tative authors with collateral reading of other authors in the 
original and in translations, and written reports on the collateral 
reading, (a) The classical historians of Rome, (b) Vergil's 
works. Prerequisite, twenty hours of credit in Latin. I, 11. 
M.W.F., at 11. (6 cr.) Mr. Stout. 

142. Senior Reading Course. Alternates with 41 and is similar in aim. 
(a) Cicero: Orations. A number of orations will be read which 
are closely connected with the public life of the time or with the 
political misfortunes of the author, (b) Readings from the Latin 
Poets. Chiefly from those who are little read or not read at all 
in other parts of the Latin course. The selections cover all periods 



26 Indiana University 

of Latin literature. Prerequisite, twenty hours of credit in Latin. 
I, II. M.W.F., at 11. (6 cr.) Mr. Stout.] 

Omitted in 1917-18. 

43. Advanced Prose Composition. II. T.Th., at 11. (2 cr.) Mr. Mexk. 

[51. Latin Inscriptions. A course to teach the use of inscriptions for 
purposes of investigation. (2h cr.) Mr. Stout. 1 

Omitted in 1917-18. 

[52. The Topography and Monuments of Ancient Rome. I, IT. 
T., 4-6. (4 cr.) Miss Berry.] 

Omitted in 1917-18. 

[53. The Reign of Augustus Caesar. Studied from the sources. Summer 
session. Daily, at 9. (2£ cr.) Mr. Stout.] 

Omitted in 1917. 

54. The Military System of the Romans. Studied from the classical 

authors and Latin inscriptions. A considerable amount of Latin 
will be read, guided in part by lectures on important phases of 
the subject. A collection of illustrative material suitable for use in 
the teaching of Caesar will be made. Summer session. Daily, at 
7:30. (2^ cr.) Mr. Stout. 

55. The Latin Romance: 'Saturae' of Petronius, and 'Metamorphoses' 

of Apuleius. A study is made of the origin, characteristics, and 
later developments of the Latin romance. I, II. M., 3-5. (4 cr.) 

Miss Berry. 

61. Seminary: The Letters of Pliny the Younger, (a) An introduction 
to the science of text criticism, based on the text of the letters of 
Pliny, (b) A series of studies on topics connected with the language 
and the subject-matter of the letters. I, II. W., 3-5, and another 
hour to be arranged. (6 cr.) Mr. Stout. 

[62. Seminary: Political Problems of the Romans. I, II. W., 3-5. 

(4 cr.) Mr. Stout.] 

Omitted in 1917-18. 

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

Professors Davisson and Rothrock; Associate Professor 1 1 anna; Assistant 
Professor Williams; Instructor Dantzig. 

Mi- graduate coui < al presenl offered bj the Department lead to the 
A.M. and Ph.D. degr< e 

A 9tuden1 wishing to secure the Doctor's degree with Mathematics as 
major subject must, early in his graduate career, designate one of the follow- 
ing main divisions of Mathematics as his specially chosen field: (1) Arith- 
metic and Algebra; (2) Calculus and Theory of Functions; (3) Geometry; 
I Applied Mathematics. In his specially chosen Held, the candidate must 
present, .-in acceptable thesis, showing an original treatment and giving 
evidence of original research, and be examined in three of the fields enum- 
■ rati 'J a bove. 



( Ik \ i > i a r 1 : SgHOOL 27 

The library of the Department, consisting <>f about 2,500 bound volumes, 
i- located in Room 36, Wylie I fall. The library is open from 8:00 a.m. to 
10:00 p.m., for use by students pursuing advanced work in Mathematics. 

The following courses are offered for properly qualified students. Days, 
hours, and credit will he arranged. 

21. Theory of Functions. Mr. Rothrock. 

39. Theory of Invariants. Mr. Hanna. 

30. Differential Geometry. Mr. Davisson. 

[31. Kncyclopedia of Elementary Mathematics. Mr. Rothrock.] 

Omitted in 1917-18. 

44. X on-Euclidean Geometry. Mr. Davisson. 
26. Projective Geometry. Mr. Davisson. 
32. Theory of Numbers. Mr. Hanna. 

45. Calculus of Variations. Mr. Rothrock. 

51. Linear Differential Equations. Mr. Williams. 

~h~). Theory of Transformations. Mr. Dantzig. 

20. Mathematical Reading and Research. 

Professors Davisson and Rothrock; Associate Professor Hanna; 
Assistant Professor Williams; Instructor Dantzio. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY 

Professors Lindley and Book; Acting Professor Elkin; President Bryan. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the Department: 

35. Modern Idealism. I, II. T.Th., at 10. (4 cr.) Mr. Elkin. 

[36. Logic of Science. I. Two hours once a week, at a period to be ap- 
pointed. (2 cr.) Mr. Elkin.] 
Omitted in 1917-18. 

5. Advanced Psychology. II. M.W.F., at hours to be appointed. 
(1 cr.) Mr. Lindley, Mr. Book. 

[7a. Comparative Psychology of Lower Organisms. I. M.W.F., at 11. 
(3 cr.) Mr. Book.] 

Omitted in 1917-18. 

30. Seminary in Philosophy. I, 11. Two hours a week, at hours to be 
appointed. Mr. Lindley, Mr. Book. 

34. Psychological Seminary. I, II. Two hours a week, at hours to be 
appointed. Mr. Lindley. 



28 Indiana University 

8. Psychological Research. 1, II. At hours to be arranged. 

Mr. Lindley, Mr. Book. 

40. Psychology of Learning and of Work. Given in conjunction with 
Education 176. II. M.W.P., at 11. (3 cr.) Mr. Book. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS 

Professor Foley; Associate Professors Ramsey and Dutcher; Assistant 

Professor Molby. 

The graduate courses offered by the Department lead to the A.M. and 
Ph.D. degrees. 

The courses comprising the work of the first three years (thirty hours) 
in Physics, also courses in photography, general laboratory work, the teach- 
ing of physics and physical manipulation, modern physics, and analytical 
mechanics (altogether forty-two hours) will be found listed in the bulletin 
of the College of Liberal Arts, or in the University Catalog. The follow- 
ing courses are open to graduate students, and to such undergraduates as 
may be prepared to take them: 

16. Spectroscopy. I, II. T.Th., at 2. (4 cr.) Mr. Ramsey. 

18. Applied Electricity and Dynamo-Electric Machinery. I. Days and 
hours to be arranged. (3 cr.) Mr. Ramsey. 

20. Electric Waves. II. T.Th., at 2. (2 cr.) Mr. Dutcher. 

22. The Conduction of Electricity thru Gases, Radio-activity, Electrone 
Theory. II. Days and hours to be arranged. (3 cr.) 

Mr. Ramsey. 

29. Differential Equations in Physics. I. M.W.F., at 8. (3 cr.) 

Mr. Ramsey. 

31. Thermodynamics. I. T.Th., at 8. (2 cr.) Mr. Molby. 

33. Physical Optics. I, II. T.Th., at 9. (4 cr.) Mr. Dutcher. 

35. Advanced Mathematical Electricity. I, II. T.Th., at 9. (4 cr.) 

Mr. Ramsey. 

37. Current Physical Literature. I, II. T.Th., at 10. (4 cr.) 

Mr. Foley. 

3.9. Advanced Theoretical Physics. 1,11. T.Th., at 11. (4 cr.) 

Mr. Foley, Mr. Ramsey. 

10. Advanced Laboratory Methods in Research. I, II. Days and hours 
lo be appointed. Mr. Foley. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOLOGY 

Professor MoENKHAUSJ Insfriietor EjDMONDSON. 

Tin' following courses in (he Department of Physiology are open to 
gradual e s1 udenl s: 

0. Advanced Physiology. 1,11. Daily, at hours to be arranged. (Credit 
to be arranged.) M.r, Moenkhaus. 



( rRADUATE SCHOOL 29 

10. Research. I. II. Daily, 8-4. Mr. Moenkhaus. 

11. Seminary. I. II. M.,at 1. (2 cr.) Mr. Moenkhaus. 

DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Professor Hershet; Associate Professor Bates; Lecturer Lapp. 

The following courses are open to graduate students in the Department: 

."). Municipal Government. T. M.W.F., at 10. (3 cr.) Mr. Bates. 

[7. Legislatures and Legislation. I. M.W.P., at 8. (3 cr.) Mr. Bates.] 
Omitted in 1917-18. Given in alternate years with 8. 

S. Public Administration. I. M.W.F., at 8. (3 cr.) Mr. Bates. 

0. Social Politics. II. M.W.F., at 8. (3 cr.) Mr. Bates. 

11. Political Theory. II. T.Th., at 11. (2 cr.) Mr. Hershey. 

12. Problems of American Foreign Policy. M.W.F., at 10. (3 cr.) 

Mr. Hershey. 

13. International Relations, (a) Present-Day Europe. (6) The Far 

East. I, II. M.W.F.,atll. (6cr.) Mr. Hershey. 

1.3. Public International Law. I, II. T.Th., at 1. (4cr.) Mr. Hershey. 

16. Training for Public Service. I, II. Hours by arrangement. 

Mr. Bates, Mr. Lapp. 

17. Constitutions and Constitution-Making. Hours by arrangement. 

Mr. Lapp. 

21. Seminary in Government. I, II. Hours by arrangement. Mr. Bates. 

22. Seminary in International Law and Diplomacy. I, II. Hours and 

credit by arrangement. Mr. Hershey. 

DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES 

Professor Kuersteiner; Associate Professors Morris, Mosemiller, and 

Hill. 

The Department of Romance Languages offers one year of graduate work, 
leading to the degree of Master of Arts. 

Following are the courses in the Department open to graduate students: 

Courses in French 

[7. Seventeenth Century Poetry and Drama. I, II. M.W.F., at 9. 

(6cr.) Mr. Kuersteiner.] 

Omitted in 1917-18. Courses 7 and 24 arc given in alternate years. 

24. Eighteenth Century Poetry and Drama. I, II. M.W.F., at 9. 
(6 cr.) Mr. Kuersteiner. 

10. Nineteenth Century: The Romantic Period. I, II. M.W.F., at 
10. (6 cr.) Mr. Morris. 



30 Indiana University 

[27. Nineteenth Century: The Realistic Period. I, II. M.W.F., at 

10. (6 cr.) Mr. Morris.] 

Omitted in 1917-18. Courses 10 and 27 are given in alternate years. 

32. Contemporary Fiction. I, II. T.Th., at 10. (4cr.) Mr. Morris. 

[33. Contemporary Drama. I, II. T.Th., at 10. (4cr.) Mr. Morris.] 
Omitted in 1917-18. Courses 32 and 33 are given in alternate, 
years. 

26. Third- Year Composition. Conducted in French. I, II. T.Th., at 
9. (4 cr.) Mr. Mosemiller. 

28. Fourth- Year Composition. Intended especially for those who expect 
to teach French. Conducted in French. I, II. T.Th., at 2. 
(4cr.) Mr. Mosemiller. 

Other Courses 

3G. Third-Year Spanish Composition. I, II. T.Th., at 10. (4 cr.) 

Mr. Hill. 

37. Nineteenth Century: The Spanish Novel. I, II. M.W.F., at 10. 

(6 cr.) Mr. Kuersteiner. 

38. Cervantes: 'Don Quixote'. I, II. Hours to be arranged. (2 cr.) 

Mr. Hill. 

13. Old French. - I, II. M.W.F., at 2. (6 cr.) Mr. Mosemiller. 

35. Vulgar Latin. I, II. M.W.F., at 2. (6 cr.) Mr. Mosemiller. 

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SERVICE 

Director Henry. 

The Department is prepared to offer opportunities in research leading 
1o 1 he A.M. and Ph.D. degrees. All of the work must be done in Indianapolis, 
but is subject otherwise to the rules which govern all graduate work. 

Study may follow practical, statistical, or scientific lines, but must 
include a thesis embodying original investigation. 

20. Research. Study of statistics and information gathered by the Depart- 
ment ; or of conditions, in any part of the State, disco vered in its 
work. I, II. Hours to be arranged. Miss Henry. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY 

Professor Eigenmann; Associate Professor I'aynk; Assistant Professor 
Scott; Instructor Hook. 

All work in the Dep.'irl merit during the summer is done at the Biological 
Station, Winona Lake, Indiana. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the Department: 

30. Advanced Zoology. Individual work. I, II. Daily, 8-4. 

Mr. Eigenmann, Mr. Payne, Mr. Scott, Miss Hoge. 



Gradu \ TE School 3 1 

31. Genera] Biological Problems. II. M.W.F., at 9. Mr. Eigenmann. 

32. Genetics. II. Th., at 9. Miss Hoge. 

50. Seminary. I, IT. M., at 4. Mr. Payne. 

60. Research. I, 11. 

Mr. Eigenmann, Mr. Payne, Mr. Scott, Miss Hock. 

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 
Professors Smith, Black, Book,* and Leonard; Associate Professor Chi LDs.f 

( Graduate work is offered in the School of Education, and special programs 
leading to the A.M. and Ph.D. degrees, with the Master's and Doctor's 
certificate in Education, will be arranged on application. 

A student whose undergraduate major was in the College of Liberal 
Arts will usually be given opportunity to do in one year the work for the 
A.M. degree in Education. The work will include such undergraduate 
courses in Education as may be necessary as a basis for the graduate work. 

The courses of the summer sessions are so arranged that graduate students 
in Education may complete the work for the Master's degree in summer ses- 
sions. 

Graduate students in Education may, by special arrangement, complete 
the work for two-thirds of a semester in the Summer session of 1917 by 
remaining until August 24. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the School: 

6. History of Education. I, II. M.W.F., at 9. (6 cr.) Mr. Childs. 

10. Philosophy of Education. I, II. M.W.F., at 10. (6 cr.) 

Mr. Black. 

15. School Administration. I, II. M.W.F., at 9. (6 cr.) Mr. .Smith 

17'/. Mental Development. Given in conjunction with Philosophy 33. 
I. M.W.F., at 11. (3 cr.) Mr. Book. 

17/>. Psychology of Learning and of Work. Given in connection with 
Philosophy 40. II. M.W.F., at 11. (3 cr.) Mr. Book. 

9. Measurement of Intelligence. I, II. T.Th., at 9. (4 cr.) 

Mr. Book. 

19. Rural Education. I, II. M.W.F., at 9. (6 cr.) Mr. Black. 

20. The Theory and Administration of Vocational Education. I, II. 

M.W.F., at 8. (6 cr.) Mr. Leonard. 

21. Vocational Guidance. I, II. T.Th., at 8. (4cr.) Mr. Leonard. 

22. Vocational Surveys. Designed for superintendents, principals, and 

directors of vocational education. I, II. M.W.F., at 9. (6 cr.) 

Mr. Leonard. 



*Ab3en1 oa leave during First semester, 191fi-17. 
iAtt-i-ni on leave during Second semester, 1916-17. 



32 Indiana University 

16.6. Seminary in School Administration. I. M., at 4. Mr. Smith. 

16C. Seminary in Elementary Education. The topic for discussion will 
be the Pedagogy of the Bible. I. M., 4-6. Mr. Black. 

16D. Seminary in Secondary Education. I. T., 7-9. Mr. Childs. 

18/:>. Research: School Administration. I, II. Hours to be arranged. 

Mr. Smith. 

INC. Research: Elementary Education. I, II. Hours to be arranged. 

Mr. Black. 

18D. Research: Secondary Education. I, II. Hours to be arranged. 

Mr. Childs. 

IKE. Research: Educational Psychology. I, II. Hours to be arranged. 

Mr. Book. 

18F. Research: Vocational Education. I, II. Hours to be arranged. 

Mr. Leonard. 

2'A. Educational Measurements. 11. T.Th., at 9. Mr. Smith. 



Students in Graduate School, 1916-17 



***The following lisl includes all graduate students who were in attendance in 
the Summer session of 1916, and the First and Second semesters of 1910-17. These 
sessions are indicated l>\ "s". "1", "2". respectively. A star prefixed to the year of 
graduation indicates thai the student completed his A.B. work at the end of the 
First semester and was enrolled in the Graduate School at the beginning of the Second 
semester, altho the A.B. diploma will not he conferred until the Commencement, of 
1917. 



Anderson. Flora Charlotte (1,2) . . .Botany Crawfordsville. 

A.B.. Indiana University, 1914. 
Anderson. Fred Xornian (s) History French Lick. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1913; A.M.. 1915. 
Armstrong, Robert Douglas (s). . . .Political Science . . . . Indianapolis. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 
Atkinson. Dayton Clifford (s) Physics Bloomington. 

A.B.. Indiana University, 1915. 
Azarraga. Francisco (1.2) Philosophy Calibo, Capiz, P.I. 

A,B. Colegio de San Beda. 1911. 
Bailey, Warren Grant (1,2) Econ. and Soc Indianapolis. 

A.B.. Indiana Central University, 1914. 
Ballinger, Jessie Flae (s,l) Education Upland. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1918. 
Barnes, George Ivan (s) Zoology Bloomington. 

A.B.. Indiana University, 1915. 
Bays. John Andrew (s) Education Roekport. 

A.B., Wabash College, 1908. 
Beebe, Ralph Edwin (s) English Warsaw. 

A.B., Winona College, 1913; A.M., Indiana University, 1916. 
Beghtel, Floyd Eldon (s,l,2) Botany Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana Central University, 1912. 
Bell, (Mrs.) Gertrude Sumption {^Education Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1910. 
Benekart. Margaret Nold (s,l, 2) . English Bloomington. 

A.B.. Indiana University, 1913. 
Bennett. Orval (s,l,2) Econ. and Soc Indianapolis. 

A.B.. Indiana University, 1915: A.M., 1910. 
Bentley, (Mrs.) Bonnie Morbley (s) History New Albany. 

A.B.. Indiana University, 1910 
Blank. Ralph John (s,l) History West Newton. 

A.B.. Indiana University, 1915; A.M., 1910. 
Blew, Michael James (1,2) Chemistry Bloomington. 

A.B.. Indiana University, 1915; A.M., 1910. 

Bolser, Claude M (1) Philosophy Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914. 
Boruff, Glenn Tourner (s) Chemistry Bloomington. 

A.B.. Indiana University, 1910. 
Boss, Charles A (s) Education Avilla. 

B.S.. B.Pd., Tri-Stale College, 1914. 
Bourn, Frederick Edward (s) Education Stilesville. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1911. 
Breeze, Frederick John (1,2) Geology Bloomington. 

B.S., Purdue University, 1910; M.S., 1912. 
Brosey, Charles Lee (s,l,2) Physics Union City. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 
Browning, Sarah Claudia (s) English Elkhart. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1910. 

(33) 



34 Indiana University 

Bryan, Maude Esther (s) Latin Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914. 
Cauble, Christopher Columbus (s). Education Clayton. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1910. 
Childs, (Mrs.) Laura Goff (s,l) . . .English Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 
Clark, Anna Rebecca (s) Mathematics Milligan. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 
Clark, Reeta (s) Education Clark's Hill. 

A.B., Hiram College, 1913. 
Cleland, Ethel (1) Political Science . . . . Indianapolis. 

A.B., Butler College, 1915. 
Cook, Charles Edward (s) Education Wanatah. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1913. 
Coleman, James Melville (1,2,). . . .Philosophy Bloomington. 

A.B., University of Michigan, 1891; A.M., 1892. 
Coleman, Margaret Faith (1,2). . . .English Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 
Cook, Guy Thomas (2) Econ. and Soc Solsberry. 

A.B., Indiana University, *1917. 
Conover, Milton (1) Political Science . . . . Harrisonville, N. J. 

Ph.B., Dickinson College, 1913; A.M., University of Minnesota, 1915. 
Cowan, James Maxwell (1,2) English Dickson, Tenn. 

A.B., Vanderbilt University, 1914; A.M., Indiana University, 1916. 
Cox, David Clarke (s) Chemistry Madison. 

A.B., Hanover College, 1916. 
Crampton, Charles J (s) Philosophy Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914. 
('raven, Nellie Pearl (1,2) Latin Nineveh. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1911. 
Curry, Claude Allen (1,2) Anatomy Farmersburg. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1916. 
Dame, Mary Ruth (s) English Monon. 

A.B., Franklin College, 1912. 
Davisson, Lillian Lucy (1,2) Romance Lang Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1916. 
Day, Edwina Elizabeth (s) English Bedford. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 
Demaree, Elizabeth Lucile (s) English Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1906. 
Deputy, Francis Myrl (s) Biology Franklin. 

B.S., Franklin College, 1915. 
Driver, Charles S (1,2) Zoology Meyer's Cove, Va. 

A. II., Bridgewater College, 1916. 
Dryden, Ethel May (1,2) English Columbus. 

AH.. Toronto University, 1915. 
Dunn, Alice Lucille (1,2) Romance Lang Indianapolis. 

\.l',., Butler College, L916. 
Eades, Henry Drury (1,2) English Evansville. 

A.B., Southern Normal College, 1905. 
Easley, Katherine (1) English New Albany. 

A.B., Indiana University, L912; A.M., 1913. 
Edmondson, (Mrs.)Edna Hatfield {I) Econ. and Soc . . . .Bloomington. 

A.B., [ndiana University, L91 I ; A.M., L914. 
Edmondson, Paul Layton (s) Education Bloomfield. 

LB., [ndiana University, L913. 
Edwards, Elmer Horace (s) Education (Mark's Kill. 

A.I',., [ndiana I rniversity, L911. 
Edwards, Florence Ethelyn (s). . . . English Oakland City. 

A.I',., I ndiana I rniversil y. [910. 

Eigenmann,Charlotte Elizabeth(i,2) Bloomington. 

\ B., Stanford University, L915. 
Ellis, Thomas Pinley (s,l,2) Econ. and Soc Valparaiso. 

a I', Valparaiso University, L914; a.m., Indiana University, L916. 



C,i{.\i>i \ i ■!■: School 



35 



Enochs, Rex Paul is) Education 

\ H . Indiana I ni\ ersil \ . 1!' I"). 

Fans, Violet Martha (s,l,2) English 

A B., Indiana I ui\crsit\ . L910. 

Finley, Georgia Elizabeth (2) Home Economics. .. . 

lis. Lew i- [nstitute, 1913. 

Folger, Harry Thomas (2) Zoology 

A.H.. Indiana University, *1917. 

Foote, Helen Christine (s) English 

A.B.. Indiana University, 1912; A.M., 1916. 
Forry, Frank (2) German 

Air. DePauw CTniversity, 1910. 
Froemming, Albert Henry (s,l,2) . . .Zoology 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 
Goldsmith, (Mrs. I Amy Houchin (2) Zoology 

A.B.. Indiana University, 1916. 
Goldsmith, William Marion (s,l,2,) Zoology 

A.B.. Hillsdale College, 1913; A.M., Indiana University, 1 
Good, James Blaine (s) Hislory 

A.B., Indiana University, 1916. 
Goss, (Mrs.) Alice Diven (s) German 

A.B., Indiana University, 1908; A.M., 1912. 
Graham, Una Arline (s) English 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 

Graves, Orville Melvin (s) 

A.B., DePauw University, 1915 
Gray, Wella Jean (s) 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 
Gregory, Mabel Hanna (1,2). . . . 

A.B., Indiana University, 1912 
Grissom, Allan Wilson (1,2) 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914. 
Grossniekle, Russell L (s,l,2). . . , 

A.B., Manchester College, 1915. 
Guthrie, Bessie Alma (s) Latin 

A.B., Indiana University, 1916. 
Guthrie, Francis Clarke (s,l,2) .... Physiology . . . 

A.B., DePanw University, 1915. 
Hale, George Clyde (1,2) Chemistry. . . . 

A.B.. A.M., Indiana University, 1915. 
Hanger, Bertha Lucinda (1,2) Botany 

A.B.. Indiana University, 1913. 
Hansford, Hazel (1) Philosophy . . . . 

A.B.. Indiana University, 1913. 
Hao, Tso Chang (s) Econ. and Soc 

A.B.. University of Illinois, 1916. 
Harmon. Paul Montgomery (s,l,2) . .Physiology . . . 

A.B.. In liana University' 1914; A.M., 1915. 
Hart, Agnes Fay (s,2) Latin 

A.B., Indiana University. 1914; A.M., 1916. 

Hemmer, Edwin John (s,l,2) Botany 

A.B.. Indiana State Normal, 1914. 



Zoology 

History 

English 

English 

. Mathematics 



Mathematics 



Hendershot, Wilfred Glenn (s) . . . 

A.B.. Indiana University, 1915. 
Henry, Edna Gertrude (1,2) 

A.B.. Indiana University, l<s<)7; A 
Hepburn, Samuel Benedict (s,2).. 

A B.. Indiana University, 1915; A 

Hess, John Ambrose (s, 1,2) German . . 

A.B., Kansas University, 1908; A.M., 1910. 
Hiekur.n, Lucian Grover (s,l,2). . .Education 

A.B.. Indiana University, 1916. 



Econ. and Soc 
M., 1914. 

History 

M.. 1916. 



Terre Haute 
Bloomington. 

Bloomington. 

Columbus. 

Indianapolis. 

Bloomington. 

.Bloomington. 

Oakland City. 

Oakland City. 

915. 

Indianapolis. 

Bloomington. 

Elkhart. 

Ft. Branch. 

New Town. 

Bloomington. 

Unionville. 

North Manchester. 

Bloomington. 

. Edinburg. 

. Dugger. 

Scottsburg. 

Bloomington. 

Wachinghsin, China, 

Bloomington. 

.Bloomington. 

Somerville. 

Spencer. 

Indianapolis. 

Bloomington. 

Bloomington. 

Patriot. 



36 Indiana University 



Hightower, Pleasant Roscoe (s,l, 2) .English Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana Central University, 1914. 
Hire, Charles (1,2) Physics Columbia City. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 
Hisey, Walter Edwin (s) Education Corydon. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1912. 
Hoffman, Daphne Margarita (s, 1,2) Romance Lang Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1912; A.M., Wellesley College, 1913. 
Hornung, Howard Vincent (s) Political Science .... Clinton. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914. 
Howard, Inez Eulalia (1,2) Latin Lincoln. 

A.B.. Indiana University, 1914. 
Hunter, Maud (1) English Lyons. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1916. 
Hutchinson, James Emory (s) Zoology Norman Station. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1916. 
Hutchinson, Robert Orland (s). . . . Physics Norman Station. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914. 
Hyslop, George Hall (s) Philosophy Indianapolis. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1913; A.M., 1914. 
Inman, Ora Homer (s) English Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 
James, Vern (s) Mathematics Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1912; A.M., Columbia University, 1916. 
Job, Leonard Bliss (s) Education Roachdale. 

A. B., Indiana University, 1915. 
Johnson, Waylan Eugene (1,2). . . .Corny. Philol Valparaiso. 

A.B., Valparaiso University, 1915. 
Johnston, Eugene Hinrichsen (s) . .English Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914. 
Jones, Walter Bower (1) Chemistry Kokomo. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914. 
Jordan, Jacob (s) Physics Corydon. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914. 
Jourdan, Florence Helen (1,2) English Evansville. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1916. 
Keck, John Hamilton (2) Geology Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1911. 

Kempf, Gerald Fidelis (1) Chemistry Bloomington. 

A.M.. Indiana University, 1916. 
Kester, Kathryn Mary (s,2) English Terre Haute. 

A.B., Indiana State Normal, 1915. 
Ketcham, Lilla McDonald (1,2) . . . English Indianapolis. 

\ . M.. Lake P>ie College, 1905; A.M., University of Chicago, 1907. 
Kid well, Edna (2) English Portland. 

All., Indiana University, 1909. 
Kincaid, (J race tmogene (s) English Franklin. 

A.M.. Franklin College, 1912. 

Kincaid, Mary Ellen (s) English Franklin. 

All., Franklin College, L914. 
King, Elsie (1,2) English Union City. 

A.M.. Indiana University, 1916. 

Kinman, Olentice (1,2) English Bloomington. 

A.M., Indiana University, 1916. 
Knapp, Marl ha Winifred (2) English Bloomington. 

\.K , Ohio Wesleyan University, 1903. 
Kodera, Yoshikazu (1,2) Econ. and Soc Kobe, Japan. 

B.C.8., Kwansei Gaknin College, Kobe, Japan. 
Kraschin, Waller (1,2) Herman Valparaiso. 

A.M., Valparaiso University, 1915. 
Kratli, William Frank (s) Education Knox. 

\ B., Indiana University, L909, 



Graduate School 37 

Lailghlin, Butler (s,l) Education Robison. 

AH.. Indiana University, 1914. 
Line, Sarah Jane English Marion. 

A.H.. Indiana University, 1916. 
Lino. Talitha Eleanor (1,2) English Marion. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914. 
Loudermill, Joseph .J (1,2) Chemistry Waveland. 

A.B.. Wabash College, 1915. 
Loury, Ethel (s) English North Vernon. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 
Luce, Leonard Monroe (s). . Mathematics McCordsville. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1906; A.M., 1916. 
Lynn, Laura Effie (2) English Wabash. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 
Lyon, Florence (1) Romance Lang Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1916. 
McAfee, George Ellsworth (s) History Borden. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1916. 
McClasky, Maude Anna (1,2) English Union City. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914. 
McCloskey, Mary Magdalene (1). . .English Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1912; A.M., 1913. 
McElhinney, Robert Stewart (1,2) .English Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1912; A.M., 1915. 
McHenry, Hazel (s) Education Cambridge, Ohio. 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1915. 
Malott, Burton Joseph (s) Geology North Vernon. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 
Malott, Clyde Arnett (1) Geology Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1913; A.M., 1915. 
Mann, Clarence Edward (s) Political Science. . . .Morristown. 

A.B., Central Normal College, 1914. 
Mason, Ruby Elizabeth Campbell 

(1) English Bloomington. 

A.B., University of Toronto, 1895; A.M., 1899. 
Mangel, Elmer Henry (s) Education Huntingburg. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1910. 
Maurer, Will Frederick (s) German Mount Vernon. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1916. 
Mayer, Esther Beatrice (1,2) English Bloomington. 

A.B.. Indiana University, 1916. 
Mebane, Daniel Bower (s,l,2) . . . .English Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1916. 
Menk, Edgar Allen (1,2) Latin Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1907. 
Meyer, Jacob C (1,2) Education Sterling, Ohio. 

A.B., Goshen College, 1916. 
Meyer, Lee Albert (s) English Huntingburg. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1913; A.M., 1916. 
Miles, Ruth (s) German Syracuse. 

A.B., Butler College, 1915; A.M., Indiana University, 1916. 
Miller, Isaiah Leslie (1,2) Mathematics Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915; A.M., 1916. 
Miller, (Mrs.) Olive Hughes (s). . .History Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1892; A.M., 1893. 
Miller, Zora Helen (s,l,2) History Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1904. 
Money, Charles Hendechy (s) History Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1916. 
Moore, Bruce Victor (s,l,2) Education Kokomo. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914. 
Morgan, Raymond (s,l,2) Physics Centerville. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1916. 



38 



Indiana University 



Morland, John Wallace (s,l,2) .... History Terre Haute. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1916. 
Morrison, Olin D (s,l,2) History Burket. 

A.B., Wabash College, 1915. 
Mueller, Johanna Caroline (1,2). . .German Indianapolis. 

A.B., Butler College, 1916. 
Murphy, Maurice Elzin (s) Econ. and Soc Clayton. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1913; A.M., University of Illinois, 1916. 
Nelson, Dotson McGinnis (s) Physics Clinton, Miss. 

B.S., Mississippi College, 1907. 
Nicholson, Thomas Edward (1,2). .Philosophy Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915; A.M., 1916. 
Nothnagel, Mildred (1,2) Botany Chicago, 111. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1913: M.S., University of Chicago, 1915. 
Odell, Charles Watters (s,l,2) Education Bloomington. 

A.B., DePauw University, 1911; A.M., 1912. 
Orahood, Charles Harold (s) Geology Kingman. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1912. 
Orvis, Mary Burchard (s) English Madison, Wis. 

A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1907. 
Painter, Carl Franklin (s) History Middleton. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 
Papish, Jacob (1,2) Chemistry Bloomington. 

B.S., Valparaiso University, 1910. 
Peckinpaugh, Earl M (s) English Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1916. 
Pflueger, Luther Appel (1,2) German Bloomington. 

A.B., Muehlenburg College, 1906; A.M., Indiana University, 1913. 



Bloomington. 

. Bloomington. 
Orland. 
Austin. 
Jasonville. 
Edinburg. 
.Bloomington. 



Piercy, Joseph William (s,l) English 

A.B., DePauw University, 1913. 
Pittenger, (Mrs.) Bess Williams 

(s,l,2) History 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914. 
Pocock, Ina Moseitus (s) Latin 

A.B., Indiana University, 1913. 
Polk, Omer Eli (s) Education 

A.B., Indiana University, 1916. 
Powell, Joseph Edgar (2) Chemistry 

A.B., Indiana University, *1917. 
Prichard, Walter (s) History 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914; A.M., 1915. 
Ramsey, Earl E (s) Education. . . . 

A.B., Indiana University, 1904; A.M., 1910. 
Reeves, Lillian Irene (s) English Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 
Ratliff, William Clarence (1) Chemistry Marion. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1916. 
Rice, Thurman B (s,2) Zoology La Fontaine. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914. 
Risely, Lee Harrison, (s) English Velpen. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1912. 
Rymer, (Mrs.) Helen Hope (2). . . .English Bloomington. 

A.B.. Miami University, 1910. 
Severs, Ephraim Vera (s) Education Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914. 
Shanks, Topeii (s) English Portland. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1913. 

Shannon, Fred Albert (s) History Brazil. 

A.I',., Indiana State Normal, 1914. 

Sheckell, Oliver Morton (s) Education Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana L'ni versity, 1913. 

Shock, Joseph Henry (s) Education Lafayette. 

A.U., Indiana University, 1902. 



Graduate School 39 

Sigler, Richard Roberts (1,2) Physiology New Salisbury. 

A B .. Indiana State Normal, 1916. 
Smith, Jessie Agnes (2) Roma tire Long Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1900. 

Smith, (Mrs.) Johnnie Rutland 

(1.2) English Bloomington. 

A.B., Florida State College, 1908. 
Smock, Florence Louise (s) English Southport. 

A.B., Butler College, 1913. 
Soupart, Sylvia Josephine (1) English Lafayette. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1909. 
Spears. Clarence Louis (2) History Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University,* 1917. 
Spitler, Orla Ray (s) Mathematics Salamonia. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1916. 
Sprague, Paul Stracey (2) History Crawf ordsville. 

A.B., Indiana University,* 1917. 
Steele, George Renwick (1) Philosophy Bloomington. 

Ph.B., Grove City College, 1901. 
Steele, Herd Cleveland (s) Chemistry Clinton, Miss. 

B.S., Mississippi College, 1910. 
Stempel, (Mrs.) Myrtle Emmert 

(1,2) Comp. Philol Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1902; A.M., 1915. 
Stephens, Mabel Elizabeth (1,2) . . .Latin Marion. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1916. 
Stewart, Ernest Dale (1,2) History Dupont. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1916. 
Strow, Carl William (1,2) Econ. and Soc Auburn. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1916. 
Summers, Grover (1,2) History Greentown. 

A.B., Indiana State Normal, 1912. 
Sutherland, Sarah Augusta (1) . . . . Home Economics. . . .Madison, Wis. 

B.S., University of Wisconsin, 1910. 
Swartz, Walter Johann (1,2) Latin and Greek. . . .Chicago, 111. 

A.B., William Jewell College, 1912; A.M., Chicago University, 1913. 
Tarter, Elmer Ellsworth (s) Education Arlington, Ky. 

A.B., University of Kentucky, 1913. 
Telfer, Robert Stockdale (s) English Bloomington. 

A.B., Wesleyan University, 1913; A.M., Indiana University, 1916. 
Telfer, William Adams (s) English Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1910; A.M., 1916. 
Thompson, Hiner J (1) Education Bloomington. 

B.S., Central Normal College, 1910. 
Thompson, Lela Prances (1,2) . . . .Econ. and Soc Frankfort. 

A.B., DePauw University, 1915. 
Tirey, Robert Milton (s) Education Mitchell. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1910. 
Townsend, Roy Weston (s) Education Matthews. 

A.B., Butler College, 1915. 
Tucker, William Motier (1) Geology Indianapolis. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1908; A.M., 1909; Ph.D., 1916. 
Tudor, Jennie Delia (s) English Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 
Turner, J Frank (2) Mathematics Bloomington 

B.S., Southern Normal School, 1916. 
Van Campen, Ethel Irene (1) English Jeffersonville. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 
Wallance, Leona Henrietta (s) . . . .History Franklin. 

A.B., Franklin College, 1914. 
Warren, Don Cameron (s,l,2) Zoology Saratoga. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914. 



40 



Indiana University 



Watson, Carl Gwartney (s) Physics Lafayette. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914. 
Weatherwax, Lewis Estel (1,2). . . .Education Coal City. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1910; A.M., 1915. 
Weatherwax, Paul (2) Botany Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914; A.M., 19i5. 
Weaver, (Mrs.) Elnora Kauff- 

man (s) History Goshen. 

A.B., Goshen College, 1913; A.M., Indiana University, 1916. 
Weaver, John E (s) Mathematics Goshen. 

A.B., Goshen College, 1914; A.M., Indiana University, 1916. 
Wellons, Blanche (s) English Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914. 
Weybright, Iva Marie (s) English Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914. 
Whinery, Smiley M (1,2) Education Warren. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1916. 
White, Cecile Woodard (1,2) Philosophy Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1913; A.M., 1915. 
White, Roy Louis (s,l,2) Education Georgetown. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 
Williams, Fannie Gertrude (s) .... English Bloomfield. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1912. 
Winchester, Clyde McClellan (s) . . Chemistry Edinburg. 

B.S., Franklin College, 1915. 
Winters, Matthew (1,2) Anatomy Poseyville. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 
Winterrowd, Bertha Olga (s) Mathematics Flat Rock. 

B.S., Franklin College, 1912. 
Winterrowd, Erne May (s) Mathematics Flat Rock. 

A.B., Franklin College, 1916. 
Wolfe, Harold Eichholtz (1,2) Mathematics Manchester. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1913; A.M., 1914. 
Wright, Emerson Blaine (s,l) Education Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1913. 
Ziegler, Lloyd Hiram (s,l,2) Philosophy Bippus. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914; A.M., 1916. 
Zimmerman, Charles (s) History North Vernon. 

A.B., Indiana State Normal, 1912; A.M., Indiana University, 1916. 
Zimmerman, Everett Edward (s,l,2) Physics Farmland. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1916. 






Vol. wi / 

No. 5 f 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 
(OFFICIAL SERIES) 



April 15 
1918 



Entered aa second-class mail matter Januarj 28, 1916, at the post office at Bloomington, 
Indiana, under the Act of Augusl 24, 1912. Published monthly, January, February, March, Au- 
gust, October, and December, and semi-monthly, April to June, inclusive, by Indiana Uni- 
versity, From the University Office, Bloomington, Indiana. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

GRADUATE SCHOOL 






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ion day i oi First and Second semesters in bold faced figures. Days ol Summer session, 
1918 (except pedal schedules of the School of Education, of the School of Medicine, the School of 
Law, and of the Biological Station), are in italic. 



(2) 



University Calendar 



SIMMER SESSION, 1918 



June 13, Thursday. 



June 14, Friday. 

August 9, Friday, 5:00 p.m. 



Registration and enrollment in 

classes. 
Recitations and lectures begin. 
Summer session ends. 



«,% Special Schedules of the School of Education. — Courses for Class A and Class 
H teachers begin Monday, June 10, and end Friday, August 23 (including 5 Saturdays). 
Classes are held on the following Saturdays: July 13, 20, August 3, 10, 17. Research 
courses continue from the opening of the Summer session until August 23 (including 4 
Saturdays) . 

School of Law.- Courses be.uin June 10 and end August 23. After July 22, instruc- 
tion is given six days a week. 

School of MEDICINE. — Courses at Bloomington begin June 10, and end August 31. At 
Indianapolis dispensary courses continue thruout the summer. Other courses begin June 
10 and July 22, and continue six weeks. 

Biological Station (at Winona Lake, Ind.). — Opens Saturday, June 15, and closes 
Friday, August 16. First half closes July 20, and second half begins July 13. 



REGULAR SESSION, 1918-19 
First Semester 



Sept. 16 and 17, Monday and Tues- 
day. 

September 17, Tuesday. 

September 18, Wednesday. 

Nov. 28 and 29, Thursday and Fri- 
day. 

December 20 to January 1. 

January 2, Thursday, 8:00 a.m. 

January 20, Monday. 

January 2U, Friday. 

February 1, Saturday, 5:00 p.m. 



Matriculation and registration; ex- 
aminations for admission. 
Enrollment in classes. 
Recitations and lectures begin. 
Thanksgiving recess. 

Christmas recess. 
Work resumed. 
Foundation Day: a holiday. 
Final examinations begin. 
First semester ends. 



Second Semester 



Feb. 1, 3, Saturday and Monday. 
February J, Monday. 
February U, Tuesday. 
March 31, Monday. 
April 3, Thursday, 12 m. 
April 8, Tuesday, 8:00 a.m. 
April 8, Tuesday. 

May 29, Thursday. 

May 30, Friday. 

June 7, Saturday, 5:00 p.m. 

June 11, Wednesday. 



Matriculation and registration. 
Enrollment in classes. 
Recitations and lectures begin. 
Enrollment of Class B students. 
Spring vacation begins. 
Work resumed. 

Enrollment for spring half -semes- 
ter. 
Final examinations begin. 
Memorial Day: a holiday. 
Second semester ends. 
Commencement. 



(3) 



Contents 



PAGE 

Prefatory Note 

Officers and Faculty of the Graduate School 7 



The Graduate School — 
General Statement — 

Purpose and Administration 10 

Admission 10 

The Library 10 

Fees 11 

Degrees — 

Master of Arts - 11 

Master of Science 12 

Doctor of Philosophy 12 

Application for Degrees 13 

Fellowships — 

University Fellowships 13 

Lawrence Fellowship in Astronomy 13 

Special Fellowships * 14 

Scholarships for Graduates of other Indiana Colleges 14 

Special Rules concerning Fellows and Scholars 14 

Waterman Institute for Scientific Research 15 

Departments and Courses of Instruction, 1918-19 — 

The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences — 

Anatomy 16 

Astronomy 10 

Botany 10 

Chemistry 17 

Comparative Philology IS 

Economics and Sociology 19 

English 19 

Fine Arts 20 

Geology. 21 

( ilTIIKIII 21 

Greek 22 

History 22 

Home Economics 24 

Journalism 24 

Latin 25 

Mathematics 27 

(4) 



Graduate School 5 

The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences Continued — page 

Philosophy 28 

Physics 28 

Physiology 29 

Political Science 29 

Romance Languages. 30 

Social Service 31 

Zoology 31 

School of Education 31 

Register of Graduate Students, 1917-18 34 



2—12057 



Prefatory Note 



Indiana University is the State University of Indiana, and the 
head of the public school system of the state. It takes its origin from 
the State Seminary, which was established by act of the legislature, 
approved January 20, 1820. In 1828 the title of the Seminary was 
changed by the legislature to that of the Indiana College, and in 1838 
the University was given its present name. In 1867 Indiana University 
became coeducational. 

The University comprises the following schools: 

The College of Liberal Arts, founded as the Indiana Seminary 

in 1820. 
The School of Law, organized in 1842 and reorganized in 1889. 
The School of Medicine, organized in 1903, and reorganized in 

1908. 
The Training School for Nurses, established in the fall of 1914. 
The Graduate School, organized in 1904. 
The School of Education, organized in 1908. 
The Extension Division, organized in 1912. 
The Summer Session, organized in 1890, reorganized in 1900. 

The first advanced degrees conferred for graduate work were 
granted in 1882. In 1904, there took place the segregation and formal 
organization of the Graduate School, and in 1908 the office of Dean of 
the Graduate School was created. 

This number of the Bulletin is devoted to setting forth the facilities 
for graduate work in the several departments of the University. The 
attention of graduates of other Indiana colleges is invited to the an- 
nouncement on page 14, of ten scholarships established by the Board of 
Trustees for such students. The value of these scholarships is $200 
each; they also carry with them exemption from Contingent, Library, 
and regular laboratory fees. For further information concerning the 
Graduate School, address, 

The Dean of the Graduate School, 

Bloomington, Indiana. 



(6) 



Officers and Faculty of the Graduate School 



GRADUATE COUNCIL 

Carl H Eigenmann, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School, and Professor 

of Zoology. 
James Albert Woodburn, Ph.D., LL.D., Professor of American History. 
Robert Edward Lyons, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 
Arthur Lee Foley, Ph.D., Professor of Physics, and Waterman Re- 
search Professor, 1917-18. 
David Myers Mottier, Ph.D., Professor of Botany. 
Ulysses Grant Weatherly, Ph.D., Litt.D., Professor of Economics and 

Sociology. 
Burton Dorr Myers, A.M., M.D., Secretary of the School of Medicine 

at Bloomington, and Professor of Anatomy. 
Bert John Vos, Ph.D., Professor of German. 
David Andrew Rothrock, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 
William J Moenkhaus, Ph.D., Professor of Physiology. 
Will David Howe, Ph.D., Professor of English. 
William Frederick Book, Ph.D., Professor of Educational Psychology, 

and Director of the Psychological Laboratory. 
Edgar Roscoe Cumings, Ph.D., Professor of Geology. 
Selatie Edgar Stout, Ph.D., Professor of Latin. 
Henry Lester Smith, Ph.D., Dean of the School of Education, and 

Professor of School Administration. 
Joseph William Piercy, A.B., Professor of Journalism. 
George Davis Morris, Dr.d'Univ. (Paris), Associate Professor of 

French. 
Frank William Tilden, A.M., Associate Professor of Greek. 
Guido Hermann Stempel, A.M., Associate Professor of Comparative 

Philology. 
Wilbur Adelman Cogshall, A.M., Associate Professor of Astronomy. 
Frank Greene Bates, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Political Science, 

and Secretary of the Graduate Council. 

FACULTY OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

William Lowe Bryan, Ph.D., LL.D., President of the University. 

Horace Addison Hoffman, A.M., Professor of Greek. 

James Albert Woodburn, Ph.D., LL.D., Professor of American His- 
tory. 
*Carl H Eigenmann, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology. 

Robert Edward Lyons, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Arthur Lee Foley, Ph.D., Professor of Physics, and Waterman Re- 
search Professor, 1917-18. 

David Myers Mottier, Ph.D., Professor of Botany. 

• Relieved of teaching duties from August 1, 1917, to August 1, 1918. 

(7) 



8 Indiana University 

Ulysses Grant Weatherly, Ph.D., Litt.D., Professor of Economics and 
Sociology. 

Burton Dorr Myers, A.M., M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 
* Samuel Bannister Harding, Ph.D., Professor of European History. 

Amos Shartle Hershey, Ph.D., Professor of Political Science and In- 
ternational Law. 

Bert John Vos, Ph.D., Professor of German. 

William A Rawles, Ph.D., Professor of Political Economy. 

Carl Wilhelm Ferdinand Osthaus, A.M., Professor of German. 

Schuyler Colfax Davisson, Sc.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

David Andrew Rothrock, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

William J Moenkhaus, Ph.D., Professor of Physiology. 
fLouis Sherman Davis, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Alfred Mansfield Brooks, A.M., Professor of Fine Arts. 

Will David Howe, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

William Wesley Black, A.M., Professor of Elementary Education. 

William Frederick Book, Ph.D., Professor of Educational Psychology, 
and Director of the Psychological Laboratory. 

Charles Jacob Sembower, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Edgar Roscoe Cumings, Ph.D., Professor of Geology. 
fROBERT Josselyn Leonard, A.M., Professor of Vocational Education. 

Selatie Edgar Stout, Ph.D., Professor of Latin. 

William Baird Elkin, Ph.D., Acting Professor of Philosophy. 

Joseph William Piercy, A.B., Professor of Journalism. 

Henry Lester Smith, Ph.D., Dean of the School of Education, and Pro- 
fessor of School Administration. 

Joseph Abraham Williams, A.M., Acting Professor of Psychology. 

George Davis Morris, Dr.d'U. (Paris), Associate Professor of French. 

Frank William Tilden, A.M., Associate Professor of Greek. 

Guido Hermann Stempel, A.M., Associate Professor of Comparative 
Philology. 

Charles Alfred Mosemiller, A.B., Associate Professor of Romance 
Languages. 

Rolla Roy Ramsey, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics. 

Oliver W Brown, A.M., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Frank Marion Andrews, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Botany. 

Lillian Gay Berry, A.M., Associate Professor of Latin. 

Henry Thew Stephenson, B.S., A.B., Associate Professor of English. 

Wilbur Adelman Cogshall, A.M., Associate Professor of Astronomy. 

Ulysses Sherman Hanna, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 
f JOSHUA William Beede, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Geology. 

Frank Greene Bates, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Political Science. 

Frank Curry Mathers, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Clarence Earl May, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Fernandus Payne, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Zoology. 



* Absent on leave in the government service from November 9, 1917, to end of 
academic year. 

f Absent on leave during academic year, 1917-18. 



Graduate School 9 

Mabel THACHEB Wellman, A.B., Associate Professor of Home Eco- 
nomics. 

Edna Gertrude Henry, Ph.D., Director of Social Service (Indian- 
apolis). 

Hubert Guy Childs, A.M., Associate Professor of Education. 

John Benjamin Dutcher, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics. 

John Hill, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Spanish. 

George Fullmer Reynolds, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English. 

Preston Albert Barba, Ph.D., Associate Professor of German. 

William Newton Logan, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Geology. 

Garland Greever, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English. 

Jacob A Badertscher, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Anatomy. 
*John Burton Phillips, Ph.D., Acting Associate Professor of Eco- 
nomics and Sociology. 

James M Van Hook, A.M., Assistant Professor of Botany. 

Will Scott, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

Robert E Burke, A.M., Assistant Professor of Fine Arts. 

Fred A Molby, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics. 

Elizabeth Sage, B.S., Assistant Professor of Home Economics. 

Albert Ludwig Kohlmeier, A.M., Assistant Professor of History. 
IKenneth Powers Williams, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathe- 
matics. 

James Grover McDonald, A.M., Assistant Professor of History. 

John Ambrose Hess, A.M., Assistant Professor of German. 

Frank C Senour, A.M., Assistant Professor of English. 

* From December 1, 1917. 

t Absent on leave in the military service. 



General Statement 



Purpose and Administration. The Graduate School furnishes op- 
portunities for advanced work leading to careers in higher education and 
in certain lines of investigation. It does not offer work leading to pro- 
fessional degrees in law or in medicine. 

The work of the School is a direct continuation of that of the Col- 
lege of Liberal Arts; and as such it is the most advanced work in educa- 
tion undertaken by the state. 

The School is administered by the Council of the Graduate School, 
composed of members of the Faculty representing different fields of 
learning. 

Admission. Students holding a Bachelor's degree in Arts, or in 
Science, from Indiana University, or the same degree, or its equivalent, 
from institutions of similar rank, are admitted to the Graduate School 
on presentation of satisfactory credentials, which should include a cer- 
tificate of graduation and a transcript of the college record. Persons 
holding the Bachelor's degree from institutions whose requirements are 
considered to lack a year, or more, of being the equivalent of the A.B. 
degree from this institution, are not admitted to the Graduate School. 
They may enter the College of Liberal Arts and are referred to the Dean 
of the College for their standing. Holders of the A.B. degree, or its 
equivalent, from institutions whose requirements lack less than a year 
of being the equivalent of the A.B. degree from this institution may be 
admitted to the Graduate School. In such cases, work in addition to the 
minimum of thirty hours for the A.M. degree will be required. The 
amount will be determined in each case by the Council of the Graduate 
School. In all cases, the student must complete to the satisfaction of the 
department of the major subject the graduate work required in that 
department for the A.M. or the Ph.D. degree. 

All graduate students will enroll at the beginning of each semester, 
and those entering regularly organized classes will submit to the same 
regulations as undergraduate students. Work will in many cases be 
individual and not controlled by a recitation schedule. At the time of 
entrance to the Graduate School the student must submit a plan of the 
entire work he wishes to present for the Master's or Doctor's degree. 
This plan must be approved by the professor of the major subject and 
the Dean of the Graduate School. Graduate work done before filing 
such plan will ordinarily not be counted toward advanced degrees. 

The Library. The Library of Indiana University at present contains 
121,718 cataloged volumes. The selection of these books has been made 
with a view to facilitating instruction and research. The collection 
is a well balanced one, but is especially strong in literary and scientific 
periodicals. The list of periodicals received and permanently kept on 
file by the; library numbers about four hundred, and includes American, 

(10) 



Graduate School 11 

English, German, French, and, to a less extent, Italian, Spanish, and 
Swedish publications. The library is made thoroly usable by a carefully 
prepared card catalog*, by indexes, and by other bibliographical aids. 

In the library building are seminary rooms for the Departments of 
History, Economics and Sociology, Philosophy, German, Romance Lan- 
guages, Latin, Greek, and Political Science. 

In addition to the central library, where the general literary and 
historical collections are housed, there are nine departmental collections, 
of varying sizes, kept in the different University buildings. 

All books, with the exception of periodicals and books reserved for 
reference, may be drawn for home use. Each student may draw books 
for two weeks, with privilege of renewal, but subject to recall. 

The library is open Monday to Friday, from 7:45 a.m. to 10 p.m., 
and on Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Fees. Students who are legal residents of the state of Indiana are 
charged a Contingent fee of $9 a semester, and a Library fee of $1.50 a 
semester. These fees cover in part the cost of the physical maintenance 
of the University; they are not applied to the cost of tuition, which is 
provided wholly by the state. 

Students not legal residents of the state of Indiana will be charged 
a Contingent and Library fee amounting to $30 a semester. The Sum- 
mer session fee is $15, irrespective of the length of the course, except 
that for a half-session's work in law $10 is charged. 

The Laboratory fees in all courses are uniformly $1.50 per credit 
hour,* except in the School of Medicine (see heading School of Medicine 
in the University Catalog, or the Bulletin of the School of Medicine), 
and for courses in domestic art, for which a fee of $1 a semester is 
charged. 

The Gymnasium fee of $2 a semester is charged all men students. 
Women students who take work in physical education will be charged 
a fee of $1.50 a semester. 

An Examination fee of $1 is charged for each make-up or special 
examination. This fee is paid to the Bursar; his receipt, when presented 
to the proper instructor, constitutes the authorization for holding the 
examination. 

The fee for any Degree is $5, and must be paid to the Bursar of the 
University at least thirty days before graduation. 

DEGREES 

Three advanced degrees, Master of Arts, Master of Science, and 
Doctor of Philosophy, are conferred by the University. 

Master of Arts. The degree Master of Arts may be conferred upon 
Bachelors of Arts of this University, or of any other institution of 
equivalent standing, or upon Bachelors of Science provided this degree 
is an alternative equivalent of the A.B. degree, following a residence at 
the University of a minimum of two semesters and the completion of a 

* Because of the increased cost of chemicals and certain other laboratory supplies, 
due to the war, the laboratory fees have been increased about twenty-five per cent in 
the Department of Chemistry. 



12 Indiana University 

minimum of thirty hours of University credit; and in addition the pass- 
ing of an oral examination on the work taken for the degree, when re- 
quired by the major department. 

Credit earned in excess of that required for the A.B. or the B.S. de- 
gree, before the degree is conferred or a certificate of the completion 
of the work for the degree is issued, is not counted toward the A.M. 
degree without special action of the Graduate Council before the work is 
done. 

Twenty of the total of thirty hours required for the A.M. degree 
must be in one department, or in closely allied departments. Ten hours 
must be distinctly graduate in character. There is no restriction as to 
the amount of work that may be carried during any semester. 

The work for the A.M. degree may all be done in summer sessions, 
provided that the work for the degree be completed within five years. 

Professional studies are not accepted for the graduate degrees, but 
research work on professional subjects may be accepted for these degrees 
at the option of the professor in charge of the major subject. 

A thesis is required in all departments except in the Departments of 
English and Latin. 

Freshman courses will not be counted on advanced degrees. 

The first ten hours in beginning French and German do not count on 
advanced degrees except by permission of the Graduate Council, on the 
written recommendation of the professor in charge of the major sub- 
ject. The Council shall in such cases fix the amount of credit to be given. 
The amount of credit that a student may receive for elementary courses 
in other subjects is determined by the professor in charge of the major 
subject. 

It is strongly urged that all students gain some proficiency in for- 
eign modern language before entering the Graduate School. Credit in 
ten hours in foreign modern language, or the certified equivalent, is re- 
quired of candidates for the A.M. degree. If the candidate does not 
meet this requirement before entering the Graduate School, he must 
obtain credit for ten hours of foreign language in addition to the regu- 
lar thirty hours required for the A.M. degree, unless by special act of 
the Graduate Council partial credit is allowed for this work in accord- 
ance with the provisions noted in the preceding paragraph. 

Master of Science. The degree Master of Science may be conferred 
upon Bachelors of Science of Indiana University under the same condi- 
tions upon which the degree of Master of Arts is conferred on Bachelors 
of Arts. 

Doctor of Philosophy. The degree Doctor of Philosophy may be 
conferred upon graduates of this University, or of any institution of sim- 
ilar character and rank, upon the completion of an advanced course of 
study of not less than three years. 

Each candidate for this degree will select a major subject consisting 
of the work of some one department or recognized subdivision of a de- 
partment; and not less than two minors, at least one of which must be 
in some department related to, but distinct from, that of the major 
subject. 



Graduate School 13 

The course for the degree will be pursued under the direction of a 
committee consisting of the heads of the departments in which the work 
is done. Its value will be determined by a final examination, and by the 
presentation of a satisfactory thesis. The thesis should usually embody 
original work upon some prescribed or accepted subject; it must always 
give evidence that the candidate is capable of forming an independent 
judgment upon the recent literature of his department. 

A detailed statement of the work offered for the degree, indorsed by 
the professor in charge of the major subject, must be submitted to the 
Council of the Graduate School not later than May 10 of the year in 
which the candidate presents himself for examination. 

On the recommendation of the professor in charge of the major 
subject, and with the concurrence of the Council of the Graduate School, 
part of the three years' study required for this degree may be spent in 
residence at other universities. 

The thesis of every candidate for the Doctor's degree shall be pre- 
sented to the Council of the Graduate School on or before the first day 
of June of the year in which he is a candidate for the degree. The 
thesis must be indorsed by the head of the department as being in its 
final form, and ready for the press. If the candidate is recommended for 
the degree, arrangements must be made to deposit five printed copies 
of the thesis in the library. 

The examination of each candidate for this degree will be conducted 
by a committee consisting of all the instructors under whom graduate 
work has been taken, in the presence of such members of the Faculty of 
the Graduate School as care to attend. 

At least one year before the final examination the candidate shall 
satisfy the professor in charge of the major subject of his ability to use 
French and German for purposes of investigation. 

Application for Degrees. Application for an advanced degree must 
be filed with the Dean at the time of admission of the candidate to the 
Graduate School. Application for the Doctor's degree must be on file at 
least one year before the candidate is admitted to the examination. 

FELLOWSHIPS 

University Fellowships. A number of University fellowships are 
available for graduate students. These fellowships carry with them an 
honorarium of between $200 and $500 annually. The highest amount will 
ordinarily be paid only if the incumbent is appointed for a third year. 
A fellowship is a recognition of scholarship. A portion of the fellow's 
time may be required in the service of the department in w T hich he is 
appointed. Appointments are for one year. 

Lawrence Fellowship in Astronomy. The Lawrence Fellowship of the 
Department of Astronomy has been established by Mr. Percival Lowell, 
of the Lowell Observatory, upon the following terms and conditions: 

1. The fellowship shall be known as the Lawrence Fellowship, in 
remembrance of the donor's mother, and is established in perpetuity, 
revocable, however, at any time at the will of the founder. 



14 Indiana University 

2. It shall be annually available and shall cover the college calendar 
year, that is, from Commencement to Commencement of the same. 

3. The applicant shall be appointed by the Department, the donor 
reserving the right of finally passing upon the suitability of the candi- 
date so presented. 

4. The fellow shall be given time and opportunity for an original 
thesis on some astronomical subject looking to the taking of a Master's 
degree, the nature of which shall be decided by the Director and the fel- 
low. But the fellow shall be expected to give general assistance in the 
work of the Observatory during the period of his fellowship. 

5. The fellowship will pay $600 and the fellow's traveling expenses 
to and from the Observatory at Flagstaff, Ariz.; and a furnished room at 
the Observatory shall be free to the fellow's use. 

Special Fellowships. There are besides the fellowships mentioned 
above, three special fellowships ranging in value from $500 to $1,000. 
These fellowships are created only for men of exceptional ability and 
merit, who may or may not have received the Ph.D. degree. 

Scholarships for Graduates of Other Indiana Colleges.* The Trus- 
tees of Indiana University, at their March meeting, 1910, established ten 
graduate scholarships of an annual value of $200 each, to be held by 
graduates of other colleges in the state. In awarding these scholarships 
the policy is to assign them to the most promising students, irrespective 
of the special field of study in which they wish to work, or the particular 
institutions from which they come. As between cases of equal merit, 
however, attention is given to securing a distribution of the awards 
among different departments of study and different colleges of the state. 

Applicants for these scholarships should file a statement of their 
educational history and of their plans with the Dean of the Graduate 
School. They should indicate in this statement the major subject which 
they wish to pursue, and give a transcript of their college record. They 
should also present at this time recommendations from their instructors, 
and such other evidences of their fitness as they can offer. Applications 
will be received up to March 1 of each year. 

Applications are referred in each case to the department concerned 
for a decision upon the respective merits of the applicants in that de- 
partment. On the basis of the departmental reports, the Graduate Coun- 
cil recommends to the Trustees the most eligible candidate for appoint- 
ment. 

These scholarships are not open to students doing professional work 
in law or in medicine. 

For application blanks, and further information, address the Dean 
of the Graduate School. 

Special Rules Concerning Fellows and Scholars. Holders of fellow- 
ships and scholarships may be required to render some service to the 
University and are not permitted, without the special permission of the 
Graduate Council, to do other work for remuneration. 

All fellows and scholars arc exempted from the payment of Con- 
tingent, Library, and regular Laboratory fees. 

J > i '-'nit [nued during I he wa r. 



Graduate School 15 

WATERMAN INSTITUTE FOR SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH 

At a meeting of the Trustees of the University on May 12, 1915, Dr. 
Luther Dana Waterman, Professor Emeritus of Medicine in the Indiana 
University School of Medicine, presented to the Trustees deeds for prop- 
erty amounting in value to $100, 000, on the following conditions: 

1. That he shall retain the management and income from the prop- 
erty during his lifetime. 

2. That the proceeds from the property be devoted to the estab- 
lishment and permanent maintenance of an Institute for Scientific Re- 
search. 

3. That the Trustees bind themselves to appropriate annually an 
amount of money for the Institute equal to the annual proceeds from 
the property. 

The Trustees accepted the proposal of Dr. Waterman in the follow- 
ing terms: "Resolved, That the generous gift of Dr. Luther D. Water- 
man to the University for the purpose therein stated be and is hereby 
accepted with the thanks of the Board. We hereby pledge the faith of 
the institution to carrv out the conditions therein contained." 



Departments and Courses of Instruction, 
1918-19 



DEPARTMENT OF ANATOMY 

Professor Myers ; Associate Professor Badertscher. 

The following are the courses open to graduate students in the De- 
partment of Anatomy: 

13. Research Work. Opportunity for research work is offered to 
advanced students who may have at least one-half their time 
for one year free for the work. I, II. Hours to be arranged. 

Mr. Myers, Mr. Badertscher. 

15. Advanced Course in Anatomy. Open to students who have com- 
pleted the dissection of the human body, and Course 8. I, II. 
Hours to be arranged. Mr. Myers, Mr. Badertscher. 

DEPARTMENT OF ASTRONOMY 

Associate Professor Cogshall 

Graduate work in this Department is partially provided for by the 
Lawrence Fellowship in Astronomy, described on page 13 of this bulletin. 
Other work of a graduate nature carried on at the University is included 
under the courses described below. 

For a description of Kirkwood Observatory and its equipment see 
the University Catalog. 

13. Astronomical Research. I, II. Days, hours, and credit to be 

arranged. Mr. Cogshall. 

14. Orbits of Spectroscopic Binaries. II. Days, hours, and credit to 

be arranged. Mr. Cogshall. 

DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY 

Professor Mottier; Associate Professor Andrews; Assistant Professor 

Van Hook. 

The following courses are open to graduate students in the Depart- 
ment of Botany: 

4. Morphology of Fungi. I. Daily, 1-3. (5 cr.) Repeated II. 

Mr. Van Hook. 

5. Plant, Physiology. I. Daily, 1-3. (5 cr.) Repeated II. 

Mr. Andrews. 

6. Cytology. I. Daily, 1-3. (6 cr.) Mr. Mottier. 

C16) 



Graduate School 17 

5A. Research in Physiology. I, II. Days and hours to be arranged. 

Mr. Andrews. 

7. Research in Morphology and Cytology. I, II. Daily, at hours 
to be arranged. Mr. Mottier. 

13. Morphology of the Algae. I, II. Daily, at hours to be arranged. 

Mr. Mottier. 

18. Investigations in Mycology and Plant Pathology. I, II. Daily, 

1-3. Mr. Van Hook. 

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

Professors Lyons, Davis*; Associate Professors Brown, Mathers, May; 
Instructors Hale|, CarrickJ. 

Special attention is given to inorganic, organic, physiological, and 
physical chemistry, and to electrochemistry, technical analytical chem- 
istry, and electrometallurgy. 

The graduate work of the Department of Chemistry, leading to the 
A.M. and Ph.D. degrees, comprises advanced laboratory, lecture, library, 
and seminary work in the lines indicated above, and special graduate 
courses described below. A thesis embodying original investigation is 
required for an advanced degree. 

The laboratories for advanced work and the departmental library 
are open from 8:00 a.m. to 4:50 p.m. There are no classes in the labor- 
atories; each student works independently. 

19. Physical Chemistry. Laboratory work. I. Laboratory open 

daily, 8-5. Hours to be arranged. Repeated II. 

Mr. Brown, Mr. Hale, Mr. Carrick. 

22. Electrochemistry. II. Lectures (A), M.W., at 8; laboratory 
(B), T.Th.F., 1-5. (22A, 2 cr.; 22B, 1 or more cr.) 

Mr. Brown, Mr. Hale, Mr. Carrick. 

15. Advanced Technical and Engineering Analysis. II. Laboratory 
open daily, 8-5. Hours to be arranged. Mr. Mathers. 

32. Gas and Fuel Analysis. II. Lectures (A), T., at 1; laboratory 

(B), at hours to be arranged. (2 cr.) Mr. Mathers. 

33. Spectrum Analysis and Sugar Analysis. I (first thirteen 

weeks). Lectures (A), F., at 1; laboratory (B) , at hours to 
be arranged. (2 cr.) Mr. Mathers. 

26. Chemical Engineering. I. M.W.F., at 11. (3 cr.) Mr. Brown. 

14. Seminary: Inorganic Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, Electro- 

chemistry, and Industrial Chemistry. I, II. Th., at 7 p.m. 
Mr. Lyons, Mr. Brown, Mr. Mathers, Mr. May. 

50. Research: Organic or Physiological Chemistry. I, II. Hours 
to be arranged. Mr. Lyons, Mr. May. 



* Absent on leave during 1917-18. 

f Absent on leave in the military service from December 1, 1917. 

% From October 22, 1917. 



18 Indiana University 

51. Research: Chemistry of the Alkaloids. I, II. Hours to be ar- 

ranged. Mr. Davis. 

52. Research: Electrochemistry, Electrometallurgy, and Physical 

Chemistry. I, II. Hours to be arranged. Mr. BROWN. 

53. Research: Inorganic Chemistry. I, II. Hours to be arranged. 

Mr. Mathers. 

24. Advanced Electrochemistry and Electrometallurgy. I, II. Lec- 

tures (A), F., at 8 (Second semester); laboratory (B), at 
hours to be arranged. Mr. Brown. 

25. Advanced Organic Chemistry. I, II. Lectures (A), T.Th., at 11 

(First semester) ; laboratory (B) , at hours to be arranged. 

Mr. May. 

13. Elementary Metallurgy and Assaying. I. Lectures (A),M.W., 
at 8; laboratory (B) , open F., 8-5. (3 cr.) 

Mr. Brown, Mr. Hale. 

29. Storage Batteries. I. Lectures (A), F., at 8; laboratory (B), 
one or more periods a week. Mr. Brown. 

31. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. I, II. Laboratory open daily, 
8-5. Hours to be arranged. Mr. Mathers. 



DEPARTMENT OF COMPARATIVE PHILOLOGY 

Associate Professor Stempel. 

The graduate courses offered below will be extended as required. 
They may be supplemented by certain of the courses listed as under- 
graduate, as well as by certain courses given in the other language 
departments and in the Departments of Economics and Sociology (De- 
scriptive Sociology), History, Philosophy, and English. 

[5. Comparative Philology of the Classical Languages. I, II. 
M.W.F., at an hour to be appointed. (6 cr.) Mr. Stempel.] 
Omitted in 1918-19. 

4. Gothic. I, II. T.Th., at 11. (4 cr.) Mr. Stempel. 

[8. Sanskrit. I, II. M.W.F., at 10. (6 cr.) Mr. Stempel.] 

Omitted in 1918-19. 

[9. Old High German. I, II. T.Th., at 11. (4 cr.) Mr. Stempel.] 
Omitted in 1918-19. Given in alternate years with Course 4. 

[10. Middle High German. I, II. T.Th., at an hour to be appointed. 
(4 cr.) Mr. Stempel.] 

Omitted in 1918-19. 

[11. Old Icelandic. I, II. M.W.F., at 9. (6 cr.) 
Omitted in 1918-19. 

in. Seminary in Historical English Grammar. I, II. 



Mr. 


Stempel.] 


W. 


, 2-4. 


Mr 


. Stempel. 



Graduate School 19 

department of economics and sociology 

Professors Weatherly, Rawles; Acting Associate Professor Phillips. 

The following courses are open to graduate students in the Depart- 
ment of Economics and Sociology: 

3a. Public Finance. I. M.W.F., at 8. (3 cr.) Mr. Phillips. 

36. Special Tax Problems. II. M.W.F., at 8. (3 cr.) 

Mr. Phillips. 
9. Transportation. II. M.W.F., at 9. (3 cr.) Mr. Rawles. 

28. Insurance. II. T.Th., at 9. (2 cr.) Mr. Rawles. 

[5. History of Economic Thought. I. M.W.F., at 11. (3 cr.) 

Omitted in 1917-18. Mr. Phillips.] 

12. Labor Organization. II. M.W.F., at 11. (3 cr.) Mr. Phillips. 

20. Descriptive Sociology, (a) Social evolution. (6) Social assim- 
ilation. I, II. T.Th., at 10. (4 cr.) Mr. Weatherly. 

4. Social Pathology, (a) Poverty and charities, (6) Crime and 
penology. I, II. M.W.F., at 10. (6 cr.) Mr. Weatherly. 

10a. Socialism. I. T.Th., at 11. (2 cr.) Mr. Weatherly. 

106. Methods of Social Reform. II. T.Th., at 11. (2 cr.) 

Mr. Weatherly. 

7. Principles of Sociology, (a) Social forces. (6) Social efficiency. 
I, II. M.W.F., at 11. (6 cr.) Mr. Weatherly. 

30. Graduate Seminary. I, II. At hours to be appointed. 

Mr. Weatherly. 

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

Professors Howe, Sembower; Associate Professors Stephenson, Reyn- 
olds, Greever; Assistant Professor Senour; Instructor Hale. 

The Department of English is prepared to offer research work 
leading to the A.M. and Ph.D. degrees, in the following periods: Eliz- 
abethan literature, the literature of the seventeenth century, of the eigh- 
teenth century, and of the first half of the nineteenth century. 

For the A.M. degree, the candidate should have had in his under- 
graduate work the equivalent of thirty hours of English, and should, 
in his graduate work, pursue a course restricted to three subjects, ap- 
proved by the Department. 

For the Ph.D. degree, the candidate will be expected to do at least 
two full years' work in residence after the Master's degree. He must 
be able to do a piece of independent research which will be acceptable 
to the Department. 

The following courses are open to graduate students in the Depart- 
ment of English: 

50. The Nineteenth-Century Romantic Poets. I, II. Days and hours 
to be appointed. (4 cr.) Mr. Greever, 



20 Indiana University 

63. Literary Problems. I, II. T.Th., at 11. (4 cr.) Mr. Reynolds. 

52. The Elizabethan Drama. I, II. M.W.F., at 11. (6 cr.) 

Mr. Reynolds. 

53. Shakspere. I. M.W.F., at 10. (3 cr.) Mr. Stephenson. 

54. Eighteenth-Century Problems. I, II. Two hours each week. 

(4 cr.) Mr. Howe. 

55. Nineteenth-Century Thought. I. T.Th., at 10. (2 cr.) 

Mr. Sembower. 

56. The Art of Poetry. II. M.W.F., at 11. (3 cr.) Mr. Sembower. 

57. Literary Criticism. I. T.Th., at 9. (2 cr.) Mr. Greever. 

58. Browning. II. Days and hours to be appointed. (2 cr.) 

Mr. Reynolds. 

59. Social Forces in English Literature. II. T.Th., at 9. (2 cr.) 

Mr. Howe. 

60. Special Reading Course for advanced students. Credit and 

hours to be arranged. Mr. Howe, Mr. Sembower, Mr. Steph- 
enson, Mr. Reynolds, Mr. Greever. 

Dante (Fine Arts 7). I, II. T.Th., at 11. (4 cr.) 

Mr. Brooks (Department of Fine Arts). 

61. American Literature. II. Prerequisite, English 6. Days and 

hours to be appointed. (2 cr.) Mr. Senour. 

62. Milton. I, II. T.Th., at 9. (4 cr.) Mr. Hale. 

63. The Poetry of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries. I, II. 

T.Th., at 11. (2 cr.) Mr. Sembower. 



DEPARTMENT OF FINE ARTS 

Professor Brooks; Assistant Professor Burke. 

The following courses in the Department of Fine Arts may count as 
graduate work on the Master's degree: 

16. The Plastic and Graphic Arts. A general introduction to archi- 
tecture, sculpture, painting, and the minor arts. A first view 
of the history and meaning of these subjects, in their relations 
to civilization. T.Th., at 10. (2 cr.) Mr. BROOKS. 

2. History of Architecture. Lectures, with collateral reading, (a) 
Greek and Roman, (b) Medieval and Renaissance. The Sec- 
ond semester's work may be taken without the first half-year's 
work. I, II. Daily, at 9. (10 cr.) Mr. Brooks. 

'.',. Sculpture, (a) Greek and Roman, (b) Middle Ages and Ren- 
aissance. The Second semester's work may be taken without 
the first half-year's work. I, II. T.Th., at 10. (4 cr.) 

Mr. Brooks. 



Graduate School 21 

7. Dante. Lectures on The New Life and The Divine Corned)/, ac- 

companied by the reading* of both in English. I, II. T.Th., at 
11. (4 cr.) Mr. Brooks. 

10. Art Criticism. A seminary course in which the art criticism of 
Reynolds, Ruskin, Pater, Tolstoi, Coleridge, Symonds, Brown- 
ing, and Hazlitt is studied. I, II. Days and hours to be ar- 
ranged. (4 cr.) Mr. Burke. 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY 

Professor Cumings; Associate Professors Beede*, Logan. 

The Department of Geology offers work leading to the A.M. and 
Ph.D. degrees. Opportunity is afforded for advanced work and investi- 
gation in stratigraphic geology and paleontology, and in economic and 
geographic geology. 

The following courses are open to graduate students in the Depart- 
ment : 

3. Economic Geology. I, II. M.W.F., at 8. (6 or 10 cr.) 

Mr. Logan. 

4. Advanced Historical Geology. I, II. M.W.F., at hours to be ap- 

pointed. (6 cr.) Mr. Cumings. 

5. Systematic Paleontology. I, II. Days and credit to be arranged. 

Mr. Cumings. 

10. Research. I, II. Hours to be arranged. 

Mr. Cumings, Mr. Logan. 

13. Advanced Field Work: Geological Survey. Days, hours, and 

credit to be arranged. Mr. Logan. 

11. Seminary. I, II. M., at 4. (No credit.) 

Mr. Cumings, Mr. Logan. 

DEPARTMENT OF GERMAN 

Professors Vos, Osthaus; Associate Professor Barba; Assistant Pro- 
fessor Hess. 

The following courses are open to graduate students: 

14. German Usage. II. T.Th., at an hour to be appointed. (2 cr.) 

Mr. Hess. 

30. Studies in the Modern German Drama. I. M.W.F., at an hour 
to be appointed. (3 cr.) Mr. Osthaus. 

32. The German Novel and "Novelle". II. M.W.F., at an hour to 
be appointed. (3 cr.) Mr. Barba. 

28. Journal Club. I. Two hours weekly, at an hour to be appointed. 
(2 cr.) Mr. Vos. 

* Absent on leave from August 1, 1<J17, to August 1, 1918. 
3—12057 



22 Indiana University 

22. German Seminary. II. Two hours weekly, at an hour to be ap- 
pointed. (2 cr.) Mr. Vos. 

27. Middle High German. I. Two hours weekly, at an hour to be 
appointed. (2 cr.) Mr. VOS. 

29. History of the German Language. II. Two hours weekly, at an 
hour to be appointed. (2 cr.) Mr. VOS. 

31. Research. I, II. Hours to be arranged. Mr. Vos. 

DEPARTMENT OF GREEK 

Professor Hoffman; Associate Professor Tilden. 

The time that may be at present profitably devoted to graduate work 
in Greek is one year, leading to the A.M. degree. A thesis on some sub- 
ject connected with the seminary work of the year is required for the 
degree. 

All candidates for the A.M. degree with Greek as major subject are 
recommended to take at least ten hours in Latin, in advance of the Latin 
taken in the undergraduate study. 

Courses 9, 12, and 13, or any part of these courses, are also open as 
minors to graduate students who have not already had as part of their 
undergraduate study the work which they take in these courses for grad- 
uate credit. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the Depart- 
ment: 

9. Lyric and Dramatic Poetry. I, II. Daily, at hours to be ap- 
pointed. (10 cr.) Mr. Tilden. 

12. Philosophical Prose. I, II. T.Th., at 10. (4 cr.) Mr. Hoffman. 

[13. Historical and Rhetorical Prose, (a) Herodotus and Thucyd- 
ides. (6) Demosthenes On the Crown. I, II. M.W.F., at 
hours to be appointed. (6 cr.) Mr. Tilden.] 

Omitted in 1918-19. 

15A. Graduate Seminary: Euripides. I, II. Th., at hours to be ap- 
pointed. (4 cr.) Mr. Hoffman. 

15B. Graduate Seminary. Author studied to be selected. I, II. W., 
at hours to be appointed. (4 cr.) Mr. Tilden. 

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY 

Professors Woodburn, Harding*; Assistant Professors Kohlmeier, 
McDonald; Instructor Esarey. 

Candidates for the Ph.D. degree with history as major subject will 
be examined in each of the following fields: (1) ancient history, with 
emphasis at the option of the candidate on either Greek or Roman his- 
tory; (2) medieval and modern history, with emphasis on either the 

* Absent on leave in the government service from November 9, 1917, to the end of 
the academic year. 



Graduate School 23 

medieval or the modern field; (3) English history, with emphasis either 
on the period before 1603 or after that date; and (4) American history, 
with chief emphasis either on the period before 1783, or after that date. 
The examination on the special field of the thesis will naturally be more 
searching- than elsewhere. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in this De- 
partment: 

[6. English Constitutional History to 1603. I, II. M.W.F., at 8. 
(6 cr.) Mr. Harding.] 

Omitted in 1918-19. 

7. English Constitutional History, 1603-1917. I, II. M.W.F., at 8. 

(6 cr.) Mr. Harding. 

8. American Colonial History. I, II. T.Th., at 8. (4 cr.) 

Mr. Kohlmeier. 

9. Renaissance and Reformation. I, II. T.Th., at 11. (4 cr.) 

Mr. Harding. 

10. Modern Europe. From about 1750 to the present time. I, II. 
M.W.F., at 11. (6 cr.) Mr. Kohlmeier. 

13. France in the Middle Ages. Ability to read French is a pre- 
requisite. I, II. T.Th., at 3. (4 cr.) Mr. Harding. 

16. Historical Method. I. T.Th., at 2. (2 cr.) Mr. Harding. 

17. Historians and History Writing in the Nineteenth Century. II. 

T.Th., at 2. (2 cr.) Mr. Harding, Mr. Woodburn. 

22. American Diplomatic History, 1776-1914. I, II. T.Th., at 2. 
(4 cr.) Mr. Kohlmeier. 

28. Origin and Growth of the American Constitution. I. M.W.F., 

at 3. (3 cr.) Mr. Woodburn. 

29. Causes and Results of the Civil War in America. II. M.W.F., 

at 3. (3 cr.) Mr. Woodburn. 

30. Development of the American West. I, II. M.W.F., at 8. (6 

cr.) Mr. Esarey. 

35. Modern Russia. I. M.W.F., at 9. (3 cr.) Mr. Harding. 

36. Balkan Problems. I. M.W.F., at 8. (3 cr.) Mr Kohlmeier. 

20A. Seminary in English History. I, II. W., 4-5:30. (Credit as 
arranged.) Mr. Harding. 

20B. Seminary in Modern European History. I, II. W., 4-5:30. 
(Credit as arranged.) Mr. McDonald. 

20C. Seminary in American History. I, II. M., 4-5:30. (Credit as 
arranged.) Mr. Woodburn. 

20D. Seminary in Indiana History. I, II. At hours to be arranged. 
(Credit as arranged.) Mr. Woodburn, Mr. Esarey. 



24 Indiana University 



DEPARTMENT OF HOME ECONOMICS 

Associate Professor Wellman; Assistant Professor Sage; Instructor 

Daum. 

To carry graduate work in this Department, students must have 
completed the equivalent of twenty hours of work in this subject, or 
must make up the deficiency. The character of the advanced work may 
be varied according to the needs of the student and may deal with the 
scientific, the economic, the sociological, or the artistic aspects of the 
subject. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the De- 
partment: 

4. Applied Design. II. T.Th., 1-3. (2 cr.) Miss Sage. 

5. History of Costume and Costume Design. Prerequisite, Fine 

Arts 14. I. Daily, 10-12. (5 cr.) Miss Sage. 

14. Dietetics and Food Chemistry. Prerequisites, Home Economics 
10 or 11, 12 (is prerequisite or parallel), Chemistry 3C. I, II. 
M.W.F., 10-12. (6 cr.) Miss Wellman. 

16. Foods III. Prerequisite, Home Economics 14. I, II. T.Th., 
8-10. (4 cr.) Miss Daum. 

25. Evolution of the Home. I, II. M.W.F., at 8. (6 cr.) 

Miss Wellman. 

26. Economics of the Family. I, II. T.Th., at 11. (4 cr.) 

Miss Daum. 

27. Seminary. Hours to be arranged. Miss Wellman. 

28. Research. Special problems. Hours to be arranged. 

Miss Daum. 

29. Women and Children in the Textile Industries. I. Hours to be 

arranged. Miss Sage. 



DEPARTMENT OF JOURNALISM 

Professor PiERCY. 

To students who have taken twenty hours of journalism as a minor 
with a major subject in either English, history, political science, philos- 
ophy, or economics, the Department offers one year of graduate work 
leading to the degree A.M.. At least sixteen hours of work in journalism 
are required, the other fourteen hours to be arranged for in consultation 
with the head of the Department. It is contemplated that a thesis shall 
be an important part of the year's work, and shall receive five hours of 
credit out of the sixteen. The subject of the thesis will deal either with 
some phase or field of country journalism, or with some special work in 
city journalism, the specialization being related, if deemed best, to the 
student's major subject when an undergraduate. 



Graduate School 25 

2. Practical Newspaper Work (on the staff of The Indiana Daily 
Student). Editorial work exclusively. I, II. Daily, at hours 
to be arranged. (6 cr.) Mr. Piercy. 

11. Advanced Course in Newspaper and Magazine Writing. I. T., 
3-5. (2 cr.) Repeated II. Mr. Piercy. 

20. Seminary. I, II. Consultation hours to be arranged. 

Mr. Piercy. 

DEPARTMENT OF LATIN 

Professor Stout; Associate Professor Berry. 

Students who begin the graduate study of Latin after having com- 
pleted an undergraduate course in the subject equivalent to that required 
of a major in the Department of Latin in Indiana University can com- 
plete the work for the Master's degree in one year. In special cases the 
work can all be done in summer sessions. The writing of a thesis is not 
required of all candidates for the Master's degree, but it is advised for 
those who expect to take additional work looking to the degree of Doctor 
of Philosophy. The work required for the Master's degree, while afford- 
ing an introduction to the methods of investigation, is arranged primar- 
ily to give a wider and more thoro acquaintance with the language and 
literature, institutions and history of the Roman people. It is hoped that 
this will meet equally well the needs of those who wish to become better 
teachers of Latin in the high schools and the lower grades of the college 
course, and of those who desire a proper foundation for the more ad- 
vanced study of Latin. 

The purely graduate courses at present offered, and those to be 
added, will be given in a series such as to offer opportunity for a three 
years' course of graduate study. Candidates for the Ph.D. degree whose 
major subject of study is Latin are required to make Greek their prin- 
cipal minor subject. A wide range of choice will be allowed for the 
second minor subject, the only requirement being that such courses shall 
contribute in some definite way to the principal work of the candidate. 
Every library resource required for investigations assigned by the De- 
partment will be supplied if not at present in the library. 

The Junior and Senior reading courses (Courses 33, 35, 41, 42) of 
the undergraduate work may be taken for graduate credit if certain 
additional work of graduate character assigned by the instructor be done 
in connection with them. The authors read in these courses are varied 
in different years, and thru a three-years' period afford graduate stu- 
dents opportunity for a wide course of reading. 

31. History of Latin Literature. I. T.Th., at 9. (2 cr.) 

Miss Berry. 

[33. Junior Reading Course. Alternates with Latin 35 and is similar 
in aim. (a) Cicero's Tusculan Disputations, Book I, with 
collateral reading from other writers who reflect Roman 
thought concerning the destiny of the soul. (b) Plautus. 



26 Indiana University 

Prerequisites, Latin 11, 14, 25, 26. I, II. M.W.F., at 9. (6 
cr.) Miss Berry.] 

Omitted in 1918-19. 
35. Junior Reading Course. An elective course, advised for all Latin 
majors who can arrange to take it. The authors and works 
read lie in fields of literature not adequately represented in 
other parts of the Latin course, (a) Prose of the Empire. 
(6) Juvenal: Selected Satires. I, II. M.W.F., at 9. (6 cr.) 

Miss Berry. 

[41. Senior Reading Course. Alternates with Latin 42 and is similar 

in aim. (a) The classical historians of Rome. (6) Vergil's 

works. Prerequisite, twenty hours of credit in Latin. I, II. 

M.W.F., at 11. (6 cr.) Mr. Stout.] 

Omitted in 1918-19. 
42. Senior Reading Course. An intensive study of one or more rep- 

resentative authors with collateral reading of other authors 
in the original and in translations, and written reports on the 
collateral reading, (a) Cicero: Orations. A number of ora- 
tions will be read which are closely connected with the public 
life of the time or with the political fortunes of the author. 
(b) Readings from the Latin poets. Chiefly from those who are 
little read or not read at all in other parts of the Latin course. 
The selections cover all periods of Latin literature. Prere- 
quisite, twenty hours of credit in Latin. I, II. M.W.F., at 11. 
(6 cr.) Mr. Stout. 

[51. Latin Inscriptions. A course to teach the use of inscriptions for 
purposes of investigation. Summer session. (2^ cr.) 

Mr. Stout.] 
Omitted in 1918. 
52. The Topography and Monuments of Ancient Rome. Studied 
from ancient and medieval sources. I, II. M., 3-5. (4 cr.) 

Miss Berry. 

[53. The Reign of Augustus Caesar. Studied from the sources. 

Summer session. Daily, at 9. (2V 2 cr.) Mr. Stout.] 

Omitted in 1918. 

[54. The Military System of the Romans. Studied from the classical 

authors and Latin inscriptions. Summer session. Daily, at 

7:30. (2V 2 cr.) Mr. Stout.] 

Omitted in 1918. 

[55. The Latin Romance: Saturae of Petronius, and Metamorphoses 

of Apuleius. A study is made of the origin, characteristics, 

and later developments of the Latin romance. I, II. M., 3-5. 

(4 cr.) Miss Berry.] 

Omitted in 1918-19. 

50. Roman Provincial Administration. Studied from the classical 

authors and Latin inscriptions. Open to Seniors, graduate 

students, and qualified teachers. Summer session. Daily, at 

7:30. (2V 2 cr.) Mr. Stout. 



Graduate School 27 

[61. Seminary: The Letters of Pliny the Younger, (a) An intro- 
duction to the science of text criticism, based on the text of the 
letters of Pliny, (b) A series of studies on topics connected 
with the language and the subject-matter of the letters. I, II. 
W., 3-5, and another hour to be arranged. (6 cr.) Mr. Stout.] 
Omitted in 1918-19. 

[62. Seminary: Political Problems of the Romans. I, II. W., 3-5. 
(4 cr.) Mr. Stout.] 

Omitted in 1918-19. 

63. Seminary: The Roman Drama. Its development and tech- 
nique, and its place in Roman life. About half of the extant 
dramas will be read in connection with the course. I, II. W., 
3-5, and another hour to be arranged. (6 cr.) Mr. Stout. 

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

Professors Davisson, Rothrock; Associate Professor Hanna; Assistant 
Professor Williams*; Instructor Dantzig. 

The graduate courses at present offered by the Department of Math- 
ematics lead to the A.M. and Ph.D. degrees. 

A student wishing to secure the Doctor's degree with mathematics as 
major subject must, early in his graduate career, designate one of the 
following main divisions of mathematics as his specially chosen field: 
(1) arithmetic and algebra; (2) calculus and theory of functions; (3) 
geometry; (4) applied mathematics. In his specially chosen field, the 
candidate must present an acceptable thesis, showing an original treat- 
ment and giving evidence of original research, and be examined in three 
of the fields enumerated above. 

The library of the Department, consisting of about 2,500 bound vol- 
umes, is located in Room 36, Wylie Hall. The library is open from 8 
a.m. to 10 p.m., for use by students pursuing advanced work in math- 
ematics. 

The following courses are offered for properly qualified students. 
Days, hours, and credit will be arranged. 

21. Theory of Functions. Mr. Rothrock. 

39. Theory of Invariants. Mr. Hanna. 

30. Differential Geometry. Mr. Davisson. 

[31. Encyclopedia of Elementary Mathematics. Mr. Rothrock.] 

Omitted in 1918-19. 

44. Non-Euclidean Geometry. Mr. Davisson. 

[26. Projective Geometry. Mr. Davisson.] 

Omitted in 1918-19. 

32. Theory of Numbers. Mr. Hanna. 

45. Calculus of Variations. Mr. Rothrock. 



* Absent on leave in the military service. 



28 Indiana University 

51. Linear Differential Equations. Mr. Williams. 

55. Theory of Transformations. Mr. Dantzig. 

20. Mathematical Reading and Research. Professors Davisson, 
ROTHROCK; Associate Professor Hanna; Assistant Professor 
Williams; Instructor Dantzig. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY 

Professor Book; Acting Professors Elkin, Williams; President Bryan. 

Following are the courses open to gradute students in the Depart- 
ment of Philosophy: 

35. Modern Idealism. I, II. T.Th., at 10. (4 cr.) Mr. Elkin. 

36. Logic of Science. I. Two hours once a week, at a period to be 

appointed. (2 cr.) Mr. Elkin. 

5. Advanced Psychology. II. M.W.F., at hours to be appointed. 
(3 cr.) Mr. Book. 

[7a. Comparative Psychology of Lower Organisms. I. M.W.F., at 
11. (3 cr.) Mr. BOOK.] 

Omitted in 1918-19. 

30. Seminary in Philosophy. I, II. Two hours a week, at hours to 
be appointed. Mr. Elkin. 

34. Psychological Seminary. I, II. Two hours a week, at hours to 
be appointed. Mr. Book, Mr. Williams. 

8. Psychological Research. I, II. At hours to be arranged. 

Mr. Book. 

40. Psychology of Learning and of Work. Given in conjunction with 
Education 176. II. M.W.F., at 11. (3 cr.) Mr. Book. 

33. Mental Development. Given in conjunction with Education 17a. 
I. M.W.F., at 11. (3 cr.) Mr. Book. 

42. Mental Measurements. I, II. T.Th., at 9. (4 cr.) 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS 

Professor FOLEY*; Associate Professors Ramsey, Dutcher; Assistant 

Professor Molby. 

The graduate courses offered by the Department of Physics lead to 
the A.M. and Ph.D. degrees. 

The courses comprising the work of the first three years (thirty 
hours) in physics, also courses in photography, general laboratory work, 
the teaching of physics and physical manipulation, modern physics, and 
analytical mechanics (altogether forty-two hours) will be found listed 
in the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or in the University Cata- 



Waterman \i< 



Graduate School 29 

log. The following- courses are open to graduate students, and to such 
undergraduates as may be prepared to take them: 

16. Spectroscopy. I, II. T.Th., at 2. (4 cr.) Mr. Ramsey. 

18. Applied Electricity and Dynamo-Electric Machinery. I. Days 
and hours to be arranged. (3 cr.) Mr. Ramsey. 

30. Electric Waves. II. T.Th., at 2. (2 cr.) Mr. Dutcher. 

22. The Conduction of Electricity thru Gases, Radio-activity, Elec- 
tron Theory. II. Days and hours to be arranged. (3 cr.) 

Mr. Ramsey. 
2!>. Differential Equations in Physics. I. M.W.F., at 8. (3 cr.) 

Mr. Ramsey. 
[31. Thermodynamics. I. T.Th., at 8. (2 cr.) Mr. Molby.] 

Omitted in 1918-19. 
33. Physical Optics. I, II. T.Th., at 9. (4 cr.) Mr. Dutcher. 

[35. Advanced Mathematical Electricity. I, II. T.Th., at 9. (4 cr.) 

Mr. Ramsey.] 
Omitted in 1918-19. 
37. Current Physical Literature. I, II. T.Th., at 10. (4 cr.) 

Mr. Ramsey. 

39. Advanced Theoretical Physics. I, II. T.Th., at 11. (4 cr.) 

Mr. Ramsey. 

40. Advanced Laboratory Methods and Research. I, II. Days and 

hours to be appointed. Mr. Ramsey. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOLOGY 

Professor Moenkhaus; Instructor Edmondson. 

The following courses in the Department of Physiology are open to 
graduate students: 

6. Advanced Physiology. I, II. Daily, at hours to be arranged. 
(Credit to be arranged.) Mr. Moenkhaus, Mr. Edmondson. 

10. Research. I, II. Daily, 8-4. Mr. Moenkhaus, Mr. Edmondson. 

11. Seminary. I, II. M., at 4. (2 cr.) 

Mr. Moenkhaus, Mr. Edmondson. 

DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Professor Hershey; Associate Professor Bates. 

The following courses are open to graduate students in the Depart- 
ment of Political Science: 

5. Municipal Government. I. M.W.F., at 10. (3 cr.) Mr. Bates. 
[7. Legislatures and Legislation. I. M.W.F., at 8. (3 cr.) 

Mr. Bates.] 
Omitted in 1918-19. Given in alternate years with Political 
Science 8. 



30 Indiana University 

8. Public Administration. I. M.W.F., at 8. (3 cr.) Mr. Bates. 

9. Social Politics. II. M.W.F., at 8. (3 cr.) Mr. Bates. 

11. Political Theory. II. T.Th., at 10. (2 cr.) Mr. Hershey. 

[12. Problems of American Foreign Policy. M.W.F., at 10. (3 cr.) 

Mr. Hershey.] 
Omitted in 1918-19. Given in alternate years with Course 14. 

13. International Relations. (a) Present-Day Europe. (6) The 

Far East. I, II. M.W.F., at 11. (6 cr.) Mr. Hershey. 

14. America and the European War. II. M.W.F., at 10. (3 cr.) 

Mr. Hershey. 

15. Public International Law. I, II. T.Th., at 1. (4 cr.) 

Mr. Hershey. 

16. Training for Public Service. I, II. Hours by arrangement. 

Mr. Bates. 

21. Seminary in Government. I, II. Hours by arrangement. 

Mr. Bates. 

22. Seminary in International Law and Diplomacy. I, II. Hours 

and credit by arrangement. Mr. Hershey. 



DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES 

Associate Professors Morris, Mosemiller, Hill. 

The Department of Romance Languages offers one year of graduate 
work, leading to the degree of Master of Arts. 

Following are the courses in the Department open to graduate 
students : 

Courses in French 

[39. Classical Drama. I, II. M.W.F., at 8. (6 cr.) Mr. Morris.] 
Omitted in 1918-19. 

40. Nineteenth-Century Authors. I, II. M.W.F., at 8. (6 cr.) 

Mr. Morris. 

[32. Contemporary Fiction. I, II. T.Th., at 10. (4 cr.) 

Mr. Morris.] 
Omitted in 1918-19. 

33. Contemporary Drama. I, II. T.Th., at 10. (4 cr.) Mr. Morris. 

26. Third-Year Composition. Conducted in French. I, II. T.Th., 
at 9. (4 cr.) Mr. Mosemiller. 

28. Fourth-Year Composition. Intended especially for those who 
expect to teach French. Conducted in French. I, II. T.Th., 
at 2. (4 cr.) Mr. Mosemiller. 



Graduate School 31 

Other Courses 

36. Third-Year Spanish Composition. I, II. T.Th., at 8. (4 cr.) 

Mr. Hill 

37. Nineteenth Century: The Spanish Novel. I, II. M.W.F., at 8. 

(6 cr.) Mr. Hill. 

38. Cervantes: Don Quixote. I, II. Hours to be arranged. (2 cr.) 

Mr. Hill. 

13. Old French. I, II. M.W.F., at 2. (6 cr.) Mr. Mosemiller. 

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SERVICE 

Director Henry. 

The Department is prepared to offer opportunities in research lead- 
ing to the A.M. and Ph.D. degrees. All of the work must be done in 
Indianapolis, but is subject otherwise to the rules which govern all grad- 
uate work. 

Study may follow practical, statistical, or scientific lines, but must 
include a thesis embodying original investigation. 

20. Research. Study of statistics and information gathered by the 
Department; or of conditions, in any part of the state, discov- 
ered in its work. I, II. Hours to be arranged. Miss Henry. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY 

Professor Eigenmann; Associate Professor Payne; Assistant Professor 

Scott. 

All work in the Department during the summer is done at the Bio- 
logical Station, Winona Lake, Indiana. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the De- 
partment of Zoology: 

30. Advanced Zoology. Individual work. I, II. Daily, 8-4. 

Mr. Eigenmann, Mr. Payne, Mr. Scott. 

32. Heredity and Evolution. Given in conjunction with Botany 21. 
I. T.Th., at 11. (2 cr.) 

Mr. Payne, Mr. Weatherwax (Department of Botany). 

50. Seminary. I, II. Th., at 4. Mr. Payne. 

60. Research. I, II. Mr. Eigenmann, Mr. Payne, Mr. Scott. 

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

Professors Smith, Black, Book, Leonard*; Associate Professor Childs. 

Graduate work is offered in the School of Education, and special 
programs leading to the A.M. and Ph.D. degrees, with the Master's and 
Doctor's certificate in education, will be arranged on application. 

* Absent on leave during academic year 1917-18. 



32 Indiana University 

A student whose undergraduate major was in the College of Liberal 
Arts will usually be given opportunity to do in one year the work for the 
A.M. degree in education. The work will include such undergraduate 
courses in education as may be necessary as a basis for the graduate 
work. 

The courses of the summer sessions are so arranged that graduate 
students in the School of Education may complete the work for the 
Master's degree in summer sessions. 

Graduate students in the School of Education may, by special ar- 
rangement, complete the work for two-thirds of a semester in the Sum- 
mer session of 1918 by remaining until August 23. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the School: 

6. History of Education, (a) Ancient and medieval periods, (b) 
Modern European and American systems. I, II. M.W.F., at 
9. (6 cr.) Mr. Childs. 

10. Philosophy of Education. I, II. M.W.F., at 10. (6 cr.) 

Mr. Black. 

12. Advanced Course in High School Problems, (a) High school 
supervision. (6) The high school curriculum. Open to Se- 
niors and graduate students with teaching experience or who 
have had Education 1 and 3 or their equivalent. Intended for 
principals and teachers of experience who are preparing for 
high school administration. I, II. T.Th., at 11. Mr. Childs. 

15. School Administration, (a) General view of the field of school 

administration. (b) Intensive study of certain phases of 
school administration with special' attention given to types of 
school surveys. I, II. M.W.F., at 9. (6 cr.) Mr. Smith. 

17a. Mental Development. Given in conjunction with Philosophy 33. 
I. M.W.F., at 11. (3 cr.) Mr. Book. 

176. Psychology of Learning and of Work. Given in conjunction 
with Philosophy 40. II. M.W.F., at 11. (3 cr.) Mr. Book. 

9. Measurement of Intelligence. I, II. T.Th., at 9. (4 cr.) 

Mr. Book. 

19. Rural Education. I, II. M.W.F., at 9. (6 cr.) Mr. Black. 

20. The Theory and Administration of Vocational Education. I, II. 

M.W.F., at 8. (6 cr.) Mr. Leonard. 

21. Vocational Guidance. I, II. T.Th., at 8. (4 cr.) Mr. Leonard. 

22. Vocational Surveys. Designed for superintendents, principals, 

and directors of vocational education. I, II. M.W.F., at 9. 
(6 cr.) Mr. Leonard. 

16B. Seminary in School Administration. I. M., at 4. Mr. Smith. 

L6C. Seminary in Elementary Education. The topic for discussion 
will be The Pedagogy of the Bible. I. M., 4-6. Mr. Black. 

L6D. Seminary in Secondary Education. I. T., 7-9. Mr. Childs. 



Graduate School 33 

16F. Seminary in Vocational Education. I, II. Time to be arranged. 

Mr. Leonard. 

18Z>. Research: School Administration. I, II. Hours to be arranged. 

Mr. Smith. 

18C. Research: Elementary Education. I, II. Hours to be arranged. 

Mr. Black. 

1SD. Research: Secondary Education. I, II. Hours to be arranged. 

Mr. Childs. 

1SE. Research : Educational Psychology. I, II. Hours to be ar- 
ranged. Mr. Book. 

18F. Research: Vocational Education. I, II. Hours to be arranged. 

Mr. Leonard. 

23. Educational Measurements. II. T.Th., at 9. Mr. Smith. 



Students in Graduate School, 1917-18 



***The following list includes all graduate students who were in attendance in the Summer 
session of 1917, and the First and Second semesters of 1917-18. These sessions are indicated by "s," 
"1," "2," respectively. A star prefixed to the year of graduation indicates that the student com- 
pleted his A.B. work at the end of the First semester and was enrolled in the Graduate School at the 
beginning of the Second semester, altho the A.B. diploma will not be conferred until the Commence- 
ment of 1918. 



Akin, Lydia Mabel (s) Home Economics Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1916. 

Allen, William Ray (1,2) Zoology Hartford City. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1913; A.M., 1914. 

Allerdice, Martha S (s) Social Service Indianapolis. 

A.B., University of Chicago, 1902. 

Anderson, Flora Charlotte (1, 2) . . .Botany Crawfordsville. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914; A.M., 1917. 

Andrews, Helen Hunt (1,2) Social Service Indianapolis. 

A.B., Butler College, 1917. 

Andrews, (Mrs.) Marie O. (s) Botany Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1902; A.M., Wellesley College, 1903. 

Azarraga, Francisco (s) Philosophy Calibo, Capiz, P.I, 

A.B., Colegio de San Beda, 1911. 

Bailey, Warren Grant (s) Econ. and Soc Indianapolis. 

A.B., Indiana Central University, 1914; A.M., Indiana University, 1917. 

Baker, (Mrs.) Mary Loveless (1).. .English Jasper. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 

Baker, Wendell Anthony (s) Education Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914. 

Barba, (Mrs.) Eleanor Martin (2). .English Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915; A.M., 1916. 

Barr, Arvil Sylvester (2) History Selvin. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915; A.M., 1915. 

Bass, William Lewis (s) History Stendal. 

A.B., Indiana State Normal School, 1915. 

Batchelor, Isabelle (1, 2) Latin Vernon. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1909. 

Beals, Colonzo Chelice (1, 2) Geology Russiaville. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1917. 
Beghtel, (Mrs.) Flossie Loem (1) . .Special English Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana Central University, 1912. 

Beghtel, Floyd Eldon (1) Botany Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana Central University, 1912; A.M., Indiana University, 1917. 

Bell, William Howard (1, 2) Chemistry Terre Haute. 

A.B., Indiana State Normal, 1917. 

Benckart, Margaret Nold (2) English Bloomington. 

A. IV, Indiana University, 1913. 
Bennett, Orval (s) Pol. Sci Indianapolis. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915; A.M., 1917. 

Beugnot, Ann Irene (1, 2)) English Fort Wayne. 

AH., Indiana University, 1917. 

Blew, Michael James (I) Chemistry Wabash. 

AH., Indiana University, 1915; A.M., 1916. 
Booker. William Raymond (s) Education Pleasantville. 

A.J'.., Indiana University, 1910. 
Boruff, Glenn Tourner (1) Chemistry Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1918. 
Bowles, Marie (2) Home Economics Bloomington. 

\ B , Indiana I University, 1915. 

(34) 



Graduate School 35 

Breeze, Frederick John (s, 1, 2). . . .Geology Bloomington. 

B 8 . Purdue University, 1910; M.S., 1912. 

Brosey, Charles Lee is) Physics Union City. 

A H . Indian.i University, 1915. 
Brown, Leila Moffett (1,2) Social Service Indianapolis. 

AB., DePauw University, 1912. 
Brown, Mildred M (s) Social Service Columbus. 

LB., Western College, 1911. 
Burke, Artie Kden (s) Education Bloomington. 

AH, Indiana University, 1914. 

Bryan, Maude Esther (1, 2) Latin Bloomington. 

All, Indiana University, 1914. 
Carlock, (Mrs.) Ethel Wohrer (1).. Special Home Econ. . Bloomington. 

LB., In< liana University, 1917. 

Carrick, Leo Lehr (1, 2) Chemistry Bloomington. 

AH., Valparaiso University, 1910; M.S., 1911; A.M., Indiana University, 1914. 

Carson. Melville Kennedy (s) English Oakdale, III. 

AH., Geneva College, 1916. 

Cauble, Christopher Columbus (1,2). Education Clayton. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1910. 

Chandler, Jesse (s) Education Alfordsville. 

AH., Indiana University, 1917. 

Childs, (Mrs.) Laura Goff (s,l,2).. .Special English Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915; A.M., 1917. 

Clark, Reeta (s) Education Clark's Hill. 

A.B., Hiram College, 1913. 
Clayton, Clarence R (1,2) Mathematics Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1917. 

Clayton, Vista May (s) English Linton. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 

Cogswell, Audney May (s) Mathematics Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 

Coleman, Margaret Faith (s) English Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915; A.M., 1917. 

Cooper, Jennie Alwilda (s) English Indianapolis. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1913. 

Cox, David Clarke (s,l,2) Chemistry Madison. 

A.B., Hanover College, 1916. 

Craven, Nellie Pearl (1) Latin Nineveh. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1911. 

Culbertson, Julian L (1,2) Chemistry Vevay. 

A.B., Hanover College, 1917. 

Culbertson, Kenneth Morton (s). . .Latin Kokomo. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1916. 

Curry, Claude Allen (1) Anatomy Farmersburg. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1916; A.M., 1917. 

Daum, Kate (1) Home Economics Lawrence, Kan. 

A.B., University of Kansas, 1913; A.M., 1916. 

Denny, Martha Livingston (s, 1,2).. Zoology Terre Haute. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1917. 

Dickey, Anna (s) History West Baden. 

AH., Indiana University, 1915. 

Dowden, Marie Louise (1) English Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1917. 

Driver, Charles S (s,l,2) Zoology Weyer's Cave, Va. 

A.B., Bridgewater College, 1916. 

Ead, Wade (2) History Anderson. 

A.B., Indiana University, *1918. 

Eades, Henry Drury (s) Economics Evansville. 

A.B., Cherry College, Ky., 1905; A.M., Indiana University, 1917. 

Eaton, Durward Leslie (s,l,2) Physics Liberty. 

B.S., Earlham College, 1907; A.M., University of Colorado, 1908. 

Eickhoff, Edith Frieda (s) German Indianapolis. 

A.B., Butler College, 1917. 



36 Indiana University 

Elabarger, Alford Leander (s) History Hartford City. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1913. 

Evans, Beatrice Clementine (s) . . . .English Bloomington. 

A.R., Indiana University, 1910; A.M., 1911. 

Farmer, Hallie (s) History Anderson. 

A.B., Indiana State Normal School, 1916. 

Fisher, Elisha Lemuel (s) Political Science Bloomington. 

LL.B., Central Normal College, 1909; A.B., Indiana University, 1917. 

Fleming, (Mrs. ) Jennie B (s) Latin Moores Hill . 

A.B., Moores Hill College, 1891. 

Foster, Ethel Henrietta (s) Home Economics Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1909. 

Foxworthy, Jay Addison (1,2) History Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1917. 

Gerst, Mary Josephine (s) English Evansville. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1917. 

Goldsmith, (Mrs.) Amy Houchin(s). Home Economics Oakland City. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1916. 

Gregory, Mabel Hanna (s) English Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1912. 

Grissom, Allan Wilson (s) English Unionville. 

Diploma Indiana State Normal; A.B., Indiana University, 1914; A.M., 1917. 

Grossnickel, Russell L (s) Mathematics North Manchester. 

A.B., Manchester College, 1915. 

Guthrie, Bessie Alma (s) Latin Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1916. 

Hale, George Clyde (1) Chemistry Dugger. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915; A.M., 1915. 

Hansford, Hazel Irene (s,l) Psychology Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1913. 

Hare, Helen (2) Social Service Indianapolis. 

Ph.B., University of Chicago, 1915. 

Hargrave, Elizabeth Lillian (1). . . .Special Home Econ. . .Richmond, Kan. 
B.S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1917. 

Harman, Paul Montgomery (1) . . . .Physiology Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914; A.M., 1915. 

Harris, Verna Prudence (s) Mathematics Bloomington. 

A.B., Butler College, 1917. 

Hendren, Edith Eulalia (1,2) History Indianapolis. 

A.B., Rutler College, 1917. 

Hepburn, Samuel Benedict (s) History Bloomington. 

AH., Indiana University, 1915; A.M., 1916. 

Herron, Goodsell Warren (s) Chemistry Greencastle. 

A.B., DePauw University, 1917. 
Hess, John Ambrose (1,2) German Bloomington. 

A.B., University of Kansas, 1908; A.M., 1910. 

Hightower, Pleasant Roscoe (s,l). .English Bloomington. 

AH, Indiana Central University, 1914; A.M., Indiana University, 1917. 

Hill, Edil h Esther (s) Mathematics Bruceville. 

A.B., Indiana I Diversity, 1916. 

Hisey, Wither Edwin (s) Education Sullivan. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1912. 

Holiman, Willis Newton (s) Education Spencer. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1913. 
Holman, Charles Thomas (2) Philosophy Bloomington. 

A.M., McMaster University, 1909; A.M., L910; D.B., University of Chicago, 1915. 
Holsen, James Noble (1,2) Economics Sumner, 111. 

A B., Union Christian College, L915; A. 15., Butler College, 1917. 
Hornung, Howard Vincent (s) Political Science. Hillsdale, Mich. 

\ I'. , Indiana I Diversity, 1914. 

Hudelson, Vista Margaret (1 ,2) .... History Bloomington. 

AM, [ndiana University, 1917. 
Humke, Homer Louis (s) Education South Whitley. 

\ p. , Tri State College, 1916. 



Graduate School 37 



Hunter, Maud (1,2) English Lyons. 

A B . Indiana University, 1916. 

Hunter, Melissa (1,2) Home Economics Lyons. 

\ B . Indiana University, 1917. 

[nman, Ora Homer (s) English Bloomfield. 

All., Indiana University, 1915. 

[ves, Mabel is) English Frankfort. 

A.M.. Indiana University, 1015. 

Job, Leonard Bliss (s) Education Roachdale. 

A IV. Indiana University, 1915. 
Johnson. Nell Lee (1) Romance Lang Bloomington. 

AH, Indiana University, 1917. 
Johnson, Thomas Covington (1,2). Special History Bloomington. 

A.M.. Indiana University, 1017. 

Johnson. Wavlan Eugene (1,2) Com p. Ph Bloomington. 

\ B ., Valparaiso University, 1915; Pg.B., 1916; .A.M., Indiana University, 1917. 
Johnston, Eugene Hinrichsen (s) . Latin Bloomington. 

A.H., Indiana University, 1914. 

Jordan. Jacob (s) Physics Lafayette. 

AH., Indiana University, 1914. 
Kempf, Gerald Fidelis (1,2) Physiology Jasper. 

A.H.. Indiana University, 191(5. 

Kester, Kathryn Mary (s) English Terre Haute. 

AH., Indiana State Normal, 1915; A.M., Indiana University, 1917. 

King, Florance Beeson (1) Special Home Econ. . Richmond. 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1914. 

Knollenberg, Margaret Agnes (1,2). German Richmond. 

A.B., Earlham College, 1910. 

Kodera, Yoshikazu (1) ". Economics Kobe, Japan. 

B.S.C., Kwausei Gaknin College, 1916. 

Kraschin, Walter Walentin (s) Education Valparaiso. 

B.S., Valparaiso University, 1914; A.B., 1915. 

Kratli, William Frank (s) Education Knox. 

A.H., Indiana University, 1909; A.M., 1917. 

Leming, Bertha Olive (2) .Social Service Goodland. 

A.B., DePauw University, 1914. 

Line, Talitha Eleanor (s) English Marion. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914; A.M., 1917. 

Lyon, Florence (1, 2) Romance Lang Delphi. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1916. 

Mangel, Emil Henry (s) Education Tell City. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1910. 

Mann, Clarence Edward (s) Political Science Morristown. 

B.S., Central Normal College, 1909; A.B., 1914; A.M., Indiana University, 1917. 

Mark, Clara Gould (1) Geology Westerville, Ohio. 

A.B., Ohio State University, 1906; A.M., 1910. ' 

Mayer, Esther Beatrice (1) English Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1916; A.M., 1917. 

McAfee, George Ellsworth (s) History Borden. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1916. 

Miller, Lettie Almira (s) Romance Lang Pasadena, Cal. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1900. 

Miller, Mary Charles (s) English Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1909; A.M., 1912. 

Miller, Zora Helen (1,2) Education Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1904. 

Moore, Bruce Victor (s) Education Kokomo. 

AH., Indiana University, 1914; A.M., 1917. 

Morland, John Wallace (s) History West Terre Haute. 

AH, Indiana University, 1916; A.M., 1917. 

Morley, Everitt Emerson (s,l,2) . . .Education Bloomington. 

A.B., Valparaiso University, 1915. 

Morrison, Olin D (s) History Burket. 

AH., Wabash College, 1915; A.M., Indiana University, 1917. 



38 Indiana University 



Morrison, Stella \Y (s) Social Service Indianapolis. 

A.B., Wellesley College, 1908. 

Mueller, Johanna Caroline (s) German Indianapolis. 

A.B., Butler College, 1916; A.M., Indiana University, 1917. 

Mulford, Hazel Elizabeth (s) Special Milan. 

B.S., Moores Hill College, 191.5. 

Nelson, Dotson McGinnis (s) Physics Clinton, Miss. 

B.S., Mississippi College, 191)7. 

Nicholson. Thomas Edward (1,2) . .Psychology Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 191.-); A.M., 1916. 

Odell, Charles Watters (s) Education Bloomington. 

A.D., DePauw University, 1911; A.M., 1912. 

Orvis, Mary Burchard (2) Journalism Madison, Wis. 

A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1937. 

Overman, Frances Dorothy (1) . . , .English Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1909. 

Painter, Carl Franklin (s) History Middletown. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 

Papish, Jacob (s,1.2) Chemistry Bloomington. 

B.S., Valparaiso University, 1910; A.M., Indiana University, 1917. 

Paterno, Simon Ramos (s,l,2) Political Science Bloomington. 

A.B., St. Beda College, 1919; LL.B., St. Thomas University, 1915. 

Pauley, Harriet Irene (s) English Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1912. 

Pearson, Helen Lucile (1,2) Social Service Indianapolis. 

A.B., DePauw University, 1913. 
Perce, Elsie Gertrude (s) Social Service Anderson. 

Ph.B., University of Chicago, 1913. 
Petty, Alonzo Allen (1) Anatomy * Kokomo. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1917. 

Polk. Mary Aline (s) English Vincennes. 

A.B., Indiana University, 191o. 

Pollock, Wiley Kendal (s) German Ligonier. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1917. 

Rawles, Katherine Robb (s) Romance Lang Bloomingtoon. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1917. 
Reed, Carolyn Mabel (s) German Bloomington. 

A.B , Indiana University, 1996. 

ReifT, Cecil Kater (s) Political Science North Manchester 

A. IV, Indiana University, 1915. 
Rice, Emmett Ainsworth (s) Education Spencer. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1916. 

Rigg, Mary (s) Home Economics Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 

Risinger, Katie Mae (1,2) Latin Osgood. 

A.B., Mo.. res Hill College, 1916. 

Risley, Pee Harrison (s) Education Velpen 

\ B . Indiana I 'niversit y, 1912. 

Roark, Louis (1,2) Geology Norman, Okla. 

A.M., University of Oklahoma, 1912. 

Rumble, Chester A (s) Education Oakland City. 

B S ., Oakland City College, 1916. 
Schellschmidl, Olga (s) English Indianapolis. 

A B., Indiana University, 1909. 
Shannon, Fred Albert (s) History Peelsville. 

A..B., Indiana State Normal, 191 I 

Shultz, William Claude (s) ... . English Lexington, Ky. 

A B . University of Kentucky, 1911; A.M., 191 1. 

Siebenthal, Pauline Mar garel (s).. Romance Long. Bloomington. 

A.B , Indiana University, 1916. 

Sigler, Richard Roberts (1).. Physiology New Salisbury 

\ B . Indiana state Normal, L916; AM, I. ..liana University, 1917. 

Smith, Cordelia (s,l,2) English New Albany. 

\ B , Indiana Qnivei it , 191, 



Graduate School 39 

Snodgrass, [Catherine (s).. .Economics Bloomington. 

\ B . Bryn Mawr College, 1915. 

Steele, Herd Cleveland is) Chemistry Clinton, Miss. 

B.S . Mississippi College, 1910 

Stempel, (Mrs.) Myrtle E (1,2).. Special Com p. Ph. . . .Bloomington. 

\ B . Indiana University, 1932; A.M.. 1915. 

Stevens, Mary Bertha (s) Romance Lang Columbus. 

\ !'■ Indian:. University, 1917. 

Stoddard. Orren Deans (s) English Merom. 

\ B . Indiana University, 1911. 

Stone. William Herschel (2) Education Spencer. 

V.B., Indiana University, *1918 
Summers, Salee Clarence (1.2) Pathology Smith's Grove, Ky 

B.S., Indiana University, 1915. 

Suter, Marjorie (s) English Laporte. 

Alt. Indiana University, 1917. 

Swain. Frances Lucy (si Home Economics Bloomington. 

B.S., University of Chicago, 1912; A.M., 1914. 
Thompson, Hiner J (s) Education Bloomington. 

B.S., Central Normal School, 1910; A.H., Indiana University, 1916. 
Turner, James Franklin (s) Mathematics Bloomington. 

B.S., Western Kentucky State Normal, 1909; A. 15., Indiana University, 1917. 
Uphaus, Willard Edwin (1,2) Education Ridgeville. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1917. 
Venn, Mary Charlotte (1,2) History Indianapolis 

A IV, Indiana University, 1917. 

Wade, Ernest Evert (s) Botany Borden. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1917. 

Wallgren, Douglas John (1,2) Mathematics Goshen. 

A.B., Goshen College, 1917. 
Warren. Don Cameron (s) Zoology Saratoga. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914; A.M.. 1917. 
Wat kins, Emma Ruth (s) Latin Dupont. 

A.B., Moores Hill College, 1914. 

Weatherwax, Paul (1,2) Botany Bloominsrt:n. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914; A.M., 1915. 

Weaver, Sibyl (1,2) English Indianapolis. 

A.B., Indiana Central University, 1916. 

Wellons, Blanche (s) English Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914. 

Weybright, Iva Marie (s) English Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914. 

Whinery, Smiley Massillion (S, 1,2) .Education Warren. 

Ii.S., Marion Normal College, 1911; A. B., Indiana University, 1916: A.M., 1917. 
White. Alverta Louisa (s,2) English Merom. 

\ .15., Union Christian College, 1908. 
Whitted, Estella Mary (s,l ) Spebial Bloomington. 

A. 15.. Indiana University, 1901. 

Williams, Edith Cadwallader (1).. Home Economics Western Springs, 111. 

A. 15.. Smith College, 1897. 
Wilson. Charles Earl (1,2) Zoology Brazil. 

A. 15.. Indiana University, 1914; A.M., 1914. 

Wilson. Cordon (1) English Bloomington. 

Life Diploma, Western Kentucky State Normal, 1913; A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 

Winters. Matthew (s) Anatomy Poseyville. 

A. 15., Indiana University, 1915: A.M., 1917. 

Wolfe, Harold Eichholtz (1,2) Mathematics North Manchester. 

A. 15., Indiana University, 1913; A.M., 1914. V. 

Wright. Emerson Blaine (1,2) Education BloomingflSC. / lt% 

A.M., Indiana University. 1913. * ^'uRARV 

Ziegler, Lloyd Hiram (s) Psychology Bippus. l "fif f)t <1 

A 15., Indiana University, 1914; A.M., 1916. ^i^M ' Tff r 

Zimmerman. Charles (s) History North Vernon.' 1 jj 



A. 15., Indiana State Normal, 1912; A.M., Indiana University, 1916. 



.\.i>., inoiana .^iare .\oroiai, lyiz; \..M., inniana i niversiry, r.iin. 

Zimmerman, Everett Edward (s) . Physics Farmland/? 

B.S., Valparaiso University, 191:': A. 15., Indiana University, 1916. 






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'^ 



Vol. XVI] 
No. 5 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

(OFFICIAL SERIES) 



April 15 
1919 



Entered as second-class mail matter January 28, 1916, at the post office at Bloomington, 
Iiuli ana, under the Act of August 24, 1912. Published monthly, January, February, March, 
August, October, and December, and semi-monthly, April to June, inclusive, by Indiana Uni- 
versity, from the University Office, Bloomington, Indiana. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

GRADUATE SCHOOL 




Announcements, 1919-20 



1919 


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...I... 








APRIL 


MAY 


JUNE 


s 


M 


T 


w 


T 

1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


F 

2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


s 

3 

10 
17 
24 


s 

2 

9 

16 

2 3 

30 


M 

3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


T 


w 


T 


F 


S 

1 

8 
15 
22 
29 


s 

6 
13 
20 

27 


M 
"7 

14 
21 
28 


T 
1 

8 
15 
22 
29 


w 

2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


T 

3 

10 
17 
24 


F 

4 

1 1 
18 
25 


s 

5 

12 
19 
26 


4 
1 1 

1 8 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 








ion days of first and second semesters in bold faced figures. Daysof summer session. 
1019 (excepl special schedules of the School of Education, of the School of Medicine, the School of 
Law, and of the Biological Station), are in Italic. 



(2) 



University Calendar 



SUMMER SESSION, 1919 



June 12, Thursday. 



June 13, Friday. 
August 8, Friday, 5 p.m. 



Registration and enrollment in 

classes. 
Recitations and lectures begin. 
Summer session ends. 



*%Special Schedules of the School of Education. — Courses for Class A and Class 
B teachers beg-in Monday, June 9, and end Friday, August 22 (including 5 Saturdays). 
Classes are held on the following Saturdays: July 12, 19, August 2, 9, and 16. Research 
courses continue from June 9 until August 22. 

School of Law.— Courses begin June 9 and end August 22. 

School of Medicine. — At Indianapolis dispensary courses continue thruout the 
summer. 

Biological Station (at Winona Lake, Ind.). — Opens Saturday, June 14, and closes 
Friday, August 15. First half closes July 19, and second half begins July 12. 



REGULAR SESSION, 1919-20 
First Semester 



Sept. 15 and 16, Monday and Tues- 
day. 

September 16, Tuesday. 

September 17, Wednesday. 

Nov. 27 and 28, Thursday and Fri- 
day. 

December 19, Friday, U p.m., to 
Dec. 31, Wednesday. 

January 1, Thursday, 8 a.m. 

January 20, Tuesday. 

January 2U, Saturday. 

January 29, Thursday, 5 p.m. 



Matriculation and registration : 

examinations for admission. 
Enrollment in classes. 
Recitations and lectures begin. 
Thanksgiving recess. 

Christmas recess. 

Work resumed. 
Foundation Day: a holiday. 
Final examinations begin. 
First semester ends. 



Second Semester 



Feb. 2, 3, Monday and Tuesday. 
February 3, Tuesday. 
February U, Wednesday. 
April 1, Thursday, U p.m. 
April 6, Tuesday, 8 a.m. 
April 6, Tuesday. 

June 1, Tuesday. 

June 5, Saturday, 5 p.m. 

June 9, Wednesday. 



Matriculation and registration. 
Enrollment in classes. 
Recitations and lectures begin. 
Spring vacation begins. 
Work resumed. 

Enrollment for spring half-semes- 
ter. 
Final examinations begin. 
Second semester ends. 
Commencement. 



(3) 



Contents 



PAGE 

Prefatory Note 6 

Officers and Faculty of the Graduate School 7 

The Graduate School — 
General Statement — 

Purpose and Administration 10 

Admission 10 

The Library 10 

Fees 11 

Degrees — 

Master of Arts 11 

Master of Science 12 

Doctor of Philosophy 12 

Application for Degrees 13 

Fellowships — 

University Fellowships 13 

Lawrence Fellowship in Astronomy 13 

Special Fellowships 14 

Scholarships for Graduates of other Indiana Colleges 14 

Special Rules concerning Fellows and Scholars 14 

Waterman Institute for Scientific Research 15 

Departments and Courses of Instruction, 1919-20 — 
The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences — 

Anatomy 16 

Astronomy 16 

Botany 17 

Chemistry 17 

Comparative Philology 19 

Economics and Sociology 19 

English 20 

Fine Arts 21 

Geology 22 

( rerman 22 

Greek 23 

History 23 

Home Economics 24 

Journalism 25 

Latin 26 

Mathematics 28 

(4) 



Graduate School 5 

The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences -Continued — page 

Philosophy 29 

Physics 30 

Physiology 30 

Polil ical Science 31 

Romance Languages 31 

Social Service 33 

Zoology 33 

School of Education 33 

Register < r ( Iuaduate Students, 1018-19 36 



2— lo9?l 



Prefatory Note 



Indiana University is the State University of Indiana, and the 
head of the public school system of the state. It takes its origin from 
the State Seminary, which was established by act of the legislature, 
approved January 20, 1820. In 1828 the title of the Seminary was 
changed by the legislature to that of the Indiana College, and in 1838 
the University was given its present name. In 1867 Indiana University 
became coeducational. 

The University comprises the following schools: 

The College of Liberal Arts, founded as the Indiana Seminary 

in 1820. 
The School of Law, organized in 1842 and reorganized in 1889. 
The School of Medicine, organized in 1903, and reorganized in 

1908. 
The Training School for Nurses, established in the fall of 1914. 
The Graduate School, organized in 1904. 
The School of Education, organized in 1908. 
The Extension Division, organized in 1912. 
The Summer Session, organized in 1890, reorganized in 1900. 

The first advanced degrees conferred for graduate work were 
granted in 1882. In 1904, there took place the segregation and formal 
organization of the Graduate School, and in 1908 the office of Dean of 
the Graduate School was created. 

This number of the Bulletin is devoted to setting forth the facilities 
for graduate work in the several departments of the University. 

For further information concerning the Graduate School, address, 

The Dean of the Graduate School, 

Bloomington, Indiana. 



Officers and Faculty of the Graduate School 



GRADUATE COUNCIL 

*Carl H Eigenmann, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School, and Professor 
of Zoology. 

James Albert Woodburn, Ph.D., LL.D., Professor of American History. 

Robert Edward Lyons, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Arthur Lee Foley, Ph.D., Professor of Physics, and Waterman Re- 
search Professor, 1917-19. 

David Myers Mottier, Ph.D., Professor of Botany. 

Ulysses Grant Weatherly, Ph.D., Litt.D., Professor of Economics and 
Sociology. 

Burton Dorr Myers, A.M., M.D., Secretary of the School of Medicine 
at Bloomington, and Professor of Anatomy. 

Carl Wilhelm Ferdinand Osthaus, A.M., Professor of German. 

David Andrew Rothrock, Ph.D., Professor of Mathmatics. 

William J Moenkhaus, Ph.D., Professor of Physiology. 

Alfred Mansfield Brooks, A.M., Professor of Fine Arts. 

William David Howe, Ph.D., Director of the Summer Session, and Pro- 
fessor of English. 

William Frederick Book, Ph.D., Professor of Educational Psychology, 
and Director of the Psychological Laboratory. 

Edgar Roscoe Cumings, Ph.D., Acting Dean of Graduate School, and 
Professor of Geology. 

Selatie Edgar Stout, Ph.D., Assistant Dean of the College of Liberal 
Arts, and Professor of Latin. 

William Wesley Black, A.M., Acting Dean of the School of Educa- 
tion, and Professor of Elementary Education. 

Joseph William Piercy, A.B., Professor of Journalism. 

Elijah Clarence Hills, Ph.D., Professor of Romance Languages. 

Frank William Tilden, A.M., Associate Professor of Greek. 

Guido Hermann Stempel, A.M., Associate Professor of Comparative 
Philology. 

Wilbur Adelman Cogshall, A.M., Associate Professor of Astronomy. 

Frank Greene Bates, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Political Science, 
and Secretary of the Graduate Council. 

FACULTY OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

William Lowe Bryan, Ph.D., LL.D., President of the University. 

Horace Addison Hoffman, A.M., Professor of Greek. 

James Albert Woodburn, Ph.D., LL.D., Professor of American His- 
tory. 
*Carl H Eigenmann, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology. 

Robert Edward Lyons, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Arthur Lee Foley, Ph.D., Professor of Physics, and Waterman Re- 
search Professor, 1917-19. 



♦Relieved of teaching? duties from August 1, 1918, to Auyust 1, 1919. Absent on 
leave from August 1, 1918. 

(7) 



8 Indiana University 

David Myers Mottier, Ph.D., Professor of Botany. 

Ulysses Grant Weatherly, Ph.D., Litt.D., Professor of Economics and 
Sociology. 

Burton Dorr Myers, A.M., M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 
*Amos Shartle Hershey, Ph.D., Professor of Political Science and In- 
ternational Law. 
fBERT John Vos, Ph.D., Professor of German. 

William A Rawles, Ph.D., Professor of Political Economy. 

Carl Wilhelm Ferdinand Osthaus, A.M., Professor of German. 

Schuyler Colfax Davisson, Sc.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

David Andrew Rothrock, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

William J Moenkhaus, Ph.D., Professor of Physiology. 

Louis Sherman Davis, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Alfred Mansfield Brooks, A.M., Professor of Fine Arts. 

Will David Howe, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

William Wesley Black, A.M., Professor of Elementary Education. 

William Frederick Book, Ph.D., Professor of Educational Psychology, 
and Director of the Psychological Laboratory. 

Charles Jacob Sembower, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Edgar Roscoe Cumings, Ph.D., Professor of Geology. 

Selatie Edgar Stout, Ph.D., Professor of Latin. 

William Baird Elkin, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy. 

Joseph William Piercy, A.B., Professor of Journalism. 
JHenry Lester Smith, Ph.D., Professor of School Administration. 
§ Joseph Abraham Williams, A.M., Acting Professor of Psychology. 

Paul Leland Haworth, Ph.D., Acting Professor of History. 

Edwin Augustus Lee, A.M., Professor of Vocational Education. 

Hubert Guy Childs, Ph.D., Professor of Secondary Education. 

John Burton Phillips, Ph.D., Professor of Economics and Sociology. 

Elijah Clarence Hills, Ph.D., Professor of Romance Languages. 

Walter Scott Monroe, Ph.D., Professor of Education. 

William Newton Logan, Ph.D., Professor of Economic Geology. 

George Davis Morris, Dr.d'U. (Paris), Associate Professor of French. 

Frank William Tilden, A.M., Associate Professor of Greek. 

Guido Hermann Stempel, A.M., Associate Professor of Comparative 
Philology. 

Charles Alfred Mosemiller, A.B., Associate Professor of Romance 
Languages. 

Rolla Roy Ramsey, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics. 

Oliver W Brown, A.M., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Frank Marion Andrews, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Botany. 

Lillian Gay Berry, A.M., Associate Professor of Latin. 

Henry Thew Stephenson, B.S., A.B., Associate Professor of English. 

Wilbur Adelman Cogshall, A.M., Associate Professor of Astronomy. 

Ulysses Sherman Hanna, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 
FRANK GREENE BATES, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Political Science. 
Absent on leave from August 1, 1918. 

V Ahscnl on leave from November 13, !!)!«. 

{Absent on leave from September, L918, to September, i!)l!>. 
| Resigned, resignation to be effective in .June, !!)!!>. 



Graduate School 9 

Frank Curry Mathers, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Clarence Earl May, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Fernandus Payne, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Zoology. 

Mabel Thacher Wellman, A.B., Associate Professor of Home Eco- 
nomics. 

Edna Gertrude Henry, Ph.D., Director of Social Service (Indian- 
apolis). 

John Benjamin Dutcher, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics. 

John Hill, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Spanish. 

George Fullmer Reynolds, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English. 

Garland Greever, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English. 

Jacob A Badertscher, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Anatomy. 

James M Van Hook, A.M., Assistant Professor of Botany. 

Will Scott, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

Robert Elisha Burke, A.M., Assistant Professor of Fine Arts. 

Elizabeth Sage, B.S., Assistant Professor of Home Economics. 

Albert Ludwig Kohlmeier, A.M., Assistant Professor of History. 
*Kenneth Powers Williams, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathe- 
matics. 
t James Grover McDonald, A.M., Assistant Professor of History. 
JJoseph Alexander Wright, A.B., Assistant Professor of Journalism. 

Frank C Senour, A.M., Assistant Professor of English. 

Clarence Edmund Edmondson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physiol- 
ogy. 

Logan Esarey, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Western History. 

Will Taliaferro Hale, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English. 

Clyde Arnett Malott, A.M., Assistant Professor of Geology. 

William H Scheifley, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Romance Lan- 
guages. 

Stephen Sargent Visher, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Geology. 

Tobias Dantzig, Ph.D., Instructor in Mathematics. 

George Clyde Hale, A.M., Instructor in Chemistry. 

James Ernest Moffat, A.M., Instructor in Economics and Sociology. 

Kate Daum, A.M., Instructor in Home Economics. 

Mary Bertha Stark, A.M., Instructor in Zoology. 

AFFILIATED RESEARCH PROFESSORS IN PHYSICS 

*% To promote the physics reseach work in Indiana the physics departments of 
some of the colleges of the state have effected an affiliation with the Physics Department 
of Indiana University. Professor Arthur L. Foley, Waterman Research Professor of 
Physics, becomes Director of Physics Research in the affiliated schools. The following 
have been appointed Affiliated Research Professors in Indiana University. 

Joseph P Naylor, Professor of Physics in DePauw University. 

M.S., Indiana University, 1885. 

Edgar Kincaid Chapman, Professor of Physics in Wabash College. 

A.B., Oberlin College, 1903 ; M.S., Chicago University, 1910. 

Edwin Morrison, Professor of Physics in Earlham College. 

B.S., Earlham College, 1888 ; M.S., Earlham College, 1891. 



* Absent on leave in the military service. 

t Absent on leave from August 1, 1918. 

t Absent on leave in military service during the fall and winter terms. 



General Statement 



Purpose and Administration. The Graduate School furnishes op- 
portunities for advanced work leading to careers in higher education and 
in certain lines of investigation. It does not offer work leading to pro- 
fessional degrees in law or in medicine. 

The work of the School is a direct continuation of that of the Col- 
lege of Liberal Arts; and as such it is the most advanced work in educa- 
tion undertaken by the state. 

The School is administered by the Council of the Graduate School, 
composed of members of the Faculty representing different fields of 
learning. 

Admission. Students holding a Bachelor's degree in Arts, or in 
Science, from Indiana University, or the same degree, or its equivalent, 
from institutions of similar rank, are admitted to the Graduate School 
on presentation of satisfactory credentials, which should include a cer- 
tificate of graduation and a transcript of the college record. Persons 
holding the Bachelor's degree from institutions whose requirements are 
considered to lack a year, or more, of being the equivalent of the A.B. 
degree from this institution, are not admitted to the Graduate School. 
They may enter the College of Liberal Arts and are referred to the Dean 
of the College for their standing. Holders of the A.B. degree, or its 
equivalent, from institutions whose requirements lack less than a year 
of being the equivalent of the A.B. degree from this institution may be 
admitted to the Graduate School. In such cases, work in addition to the 
minimum of thirty hours for the A.M. degree will be required. The 
amount will be determined in each case by the Council of the Graduate 
School. In all cases, the student must complete to the satisfaction of the 
department of the major subject the graduate work required in that 
department for the A.M. or the Ph.D. degree. 

All graduate students will enroll at the beginning of each semester, 
and those entering regularly organized classes will submit to the same 
regulations as undergraduate students. Work will in many cases be 
individual and not controlled by a recitation schedule. At the time of 
entrance to the Graduate School the student must submit a plan of the 
entire work he wishes to present for the Master's or Doctor's degree. 
This plan must be approved by the professor of the major subject and 
the Dean of the Graduate School. Graduate work done before filing such 
plan will ordinarily not be counted toward advanced degrees. 

The Library. The Library of Indiana University at present contains 
128,100 cataloged volumes. The selection of these books has been made 
with a view to facilitating instruction and research. The collection is 
a well balanced one, but is especially strong in literary and scientific 

(10) 



Graduate School 11 

periodicals. The list of periodicals received and permanently kept on 
file by the library numbers about four hundred, and includes American, 
English, German, French, and, to a less extent, Italian, Spanish, and 
Swedish publications. The library is made thoroly usable by a carefully 
prepared card catalog, by indexes, and by other bibliographical aids. 

In the library building- are seminary rooms for the Departments of 
History, Economics and Sociology, Philosophy, German, Romance Lan- 
guages, Latin, Greek, and Political Science. 

In addition to the central library, where the general literary and 
historical collections are housed, there are nine departmental collections, 
of varying sizes, kept in the different University buildings. 

All books, with the exception of periodicals and books reserved for 
reference, may be drawn for home use. Each student may draw books 
for two weeks, with privilege of renewal, but subject to recall. 

The library is open Monday to Friday, from 7:45 a.m. to 10 p.m., 
and on Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Fees. Students who are legal residents of the state of Indiana are 
charged a Contingent fee of $9 a semester, and a Library fee of $1.50 a 
semester. These fees cover in part the cost of the physical maintenance 
of the University; they are not applied to the cost of tuition, which is 
provided wholly by the state. 

Students not legal residents of the state of Indiana will be charged 
a Contingent and Library fee amounting to $30 a semester. The Sum- 
mer session fee is $15, irrespective of the length of the course, except 
that for each half-session's work in law $10 is charged. 

The Laboratory fees in all courses are uniformly $1.50 a credit 
hour,* except in the School of Medicine (see heading School of Medicine 
in the University Catalog, or the Bulletin of the School of Medicine), 
and for courses in domestic art, for which a fee of $1 a semester is 
charged. 

A Gymnasium fee of $2 a semester is charged all students who 
take work in physical education. 

An Examination fee of $1 is charged for each make-up or special 
examination. This fee is paid to the Bursar; his receipt, when presented 
to the proper instructor, constitutes the authorization for holding the 
examination. 

The fee for any Degree is $5, and must be paid to the Bursar of the 
University at least thirty days before graduation. 



DEGREES 

Three advanced degrees, Master of Arts, Master of Science, and 
Doctor of Philosophy, are conferred by the University. 

Master of Arts. The degree Master of Arts may be conferred upon 
Bachelors of Arts of this University, or of any other institution of 
equivalent standing, or upon Bachelors of Science provided this degree 

* Because of the increased cost of chemicals and certain other laboratory supplies, 
due to the war, the laboratory fees have been increased to $2 a credit hour in the Depart- 
ment of Chemistry. 



12 Indiana University 

is an alternative equivalent of the A.B. degree, following a residence at 
the University of a minimum of two semesters and the completion of a 
minimum of thirty hours of University credit; and in addition the pass- 
ing of an oral examination on the work taken for the degree, when re- 
quired by the major department. 

Credit earned in excess of that required for the A.B. or the B.S. de- 
gree, before the degree is conferred or a certificate of the completion 
of the work for the degree is issued, is not counted toward the A.M. 
degree without special action of the Graduate Council before the work is 
done. 

Twenty of the total of thirty hours required for the A.M. degree 
must be in one department, or in closely allied departments. Ten hours 
must be distinctly graduate in character. There is no restriction as to 
the amount of work that may be carried during any semester. 

The work for the A.M. degree may all be done in summer sessions, 
provided that the work for the degree be completed within five years. 

Professional studies are not accepted for the graduate degrees, but 
research work on professional subjects may be accepted for these degrees 
at the option of the professor in charge of the major subject. 

A thesis is required in all departments except in the Departments of 
English and Latin. 

Freshman courses will not be counted on advanced degrees. 

The first ten hours in beginning French and German do not count on 
advanced degrees except by permission of the Graduate Council, on the 
written recommendation of the professor in charge of the major sub- 
ject. The Council shall in such cases fix the amount of credit to be given. 
The amount of credit that a student may receive for elementary courses 
in other subjects is determined by the professor in charge of the major 
subject. 

It is strongly urged that all students gain some proficiency in for- 
eign modern language before entering the Graduate School. Credit in 
ten hours in foreign modern language, or the certified equivalent, is re- 
quired of candidates for the A.M. degree. If the candidate does not 
meet this requirement before entering the Graduate School, he must 
obtain credit for ten hours of foreign language in addition to the regu- 
lar thirty hours required for the A.M. degree, unless by special act of 
the Graduate Council partial credit is allowed for this work in accord- 
ance with the provisions noted in the preceding paragraph. 

Master of Science. The degree Master of Science may be conferred 
upon Bachelors of Science of Indiana University under the same condi- 
tions upon which the degree of Master of Arts is conferred on Bachelors 
of Ails. 

Doctor of Philosophy. The degree Doctor of Philosophy may be 
conferred upon graduates of this University, or of any institution of sim- 
ilar character and rank, upon the completion of an advanced course of 
study of not less than three years. 

Each candidate for this degree will select a major subject consisting 
of the work of some one; department or recognized subdivision of a de- 
partment; and not less than two minors, at least one of which must be 



Graduate School 13 

in sonic department related to, but distinct from, that of the major 
subject. 

The course for the degree will be pursued under the direction of a 
committee consisting* of the heads of the departments in which the work 
is done. Its value will be determined by a final examination, and by the 
presentation of a satisfactory thesis. The thesis should usually embody 
original work upon some prescribed or accepted subject; it must always 
give evidence that the candidate is capable of forming an independent 
judgment upon the recent literature of his department. 

A detailed statement of the work offered for the degree, indorsed by 
the professor in charge of the major subject, must be submitted to the 
Council of the Graduate School not later than May 10 of the year in 
which the candidate presents himself for examination. 

On the recommendation of the professor in charge of the major 
subject, and with the concurrence of the Council of the Graduate School, 
part of the three years' study required for this degree may be spent in 
residence at other universities. 

The thesis of every candidate for the Doctor's degree shall be pre- 
sented to the Council of the Graduate School on or before the first day 
of June of the year in which he is a candidate for the degree. The 
thesis must be indorsed by the head of the department as being in its 
final form, and ready for the press. If the candidate is recommended for 
the degree, arrangements must be made to deposit five printed copies 
of the thesis in the library. 

The examination of each candidate for this degree will be conducted 
by a committee consisting of all the instructors under whom graduate 
work has been taken, in the presence of such members of the Faculty of 
the Graduate School as care to attend. 

At least one year before the final examination the candidate shall 
satisfy the professor in charge of the major subject of his ability to use 
French and German for purposes of investigation. 

Application for Degrees. Application for an advanced degree must 
be filed with the Dean at the time of admission of the candidate to the 
Graduate School. Application for the Doctor's degree must be on file at 
least one year before the candidate is admitted to the examination. 

FELLOWSHIPS 

University Fellowships. A number of University fellowships are 
available for graduate students who have had at least a year of graduate 
work. These fellowships carry with them an honorarium of between 
$300 and $500 annually. The highest amount will ordinarily be paid 
only if the incumbent is appointed for a third year. A fellowship is a 
recognition of scholarship. A portion of the fellow's time may be re- 
quired in the service of the department in which he is appointed. Ap- 
pointments are for one year. 

Lawrence Fellowship in Astronomy. The Lawrence Fellowship of the 
Department of Astronomy has been established by Mr. Percival Lowell, 
of the Lowell Observatory, upon the following terms and conditions : 



14 Indiana University 

1. The fellowship shall be known as the Lawrence Fellowship, in 
remembrance of the donor's mother, and is established in perpetuity, 
revocable, however, at any time at the will of the founder. 

2. It shall be annually available and shall cover the college calendar 
year, that is, from Commencement to Commencement of the same. 

3. The applicant shall be appointed by the Department, the doncr 
reserving the right of finally passing upon the suitability of the candi- 
date so presented. 

4. The fellow shall be given time and opportunity for an original 
thesis on some astronomical subject looking to the taking of a Master';; 
degree, the nature of which shall be decided by the Director and the fel- 
low. But the fellow shall be expected to give general assistance in the 
work of the Observatory during the period of his fellowship. 

5. The fellowship will pay $600 and the fellow's traveling expenses 
to and from the Observatory at Flagstaff, Ariz., and a furnished room at 
the Observatory shall be free to the fellow's use. 

Special Fellowships, There are besides the fellowships mentioned 
above, three special fellowships ranging in value from $500 to $1,000. 
These fellowships are created only for persons of exceptional ability and 
merit, who may or may not have received the Ph.D. degree. 

Scholarships for Graduates of Other Indiana Colleges.* The Trus- 
tees of Indiana University, at their March meeting, 1910, established ten 
graduate scholarships of an annual value of $200 each, to be held by 
graduates of other colleges in the state. In awarding these scholarships 
the policy is to assign them to the most promising students, irrespective 
of the special field of study in which they wish to work, or the particular 
institutions from which they come. As between cases of equal merit, 
however, attention is given to securing a distribution of the awards 
among different departments of study and different colleges of the state. 

Applicants for these scholarships should file a statement of their 
educational history and of their plans with the Dean of the Graduate 
School. They should indicate in this statement the major subject which 
they wish to pursue, and give a transcript of their college record. They 
should also present at this time recommendations from their instructors, 
and such other evidences of their fitness as they can offer. Applications 
will be received up to March 1 of each year. 

Applications are referred in each case to the department concerned 
for a decision upon the respective merits of the applicants in that de- 
partment. On the basis of the departmental reports, the Graduate Coun- 
cil recommends to the Trustees the most eligible candidate for appoint- 
ment. 

These scholarships are not open to students doing professional work 
in law or in medicine. 

For application blanks, and further information, address the Dean 
of the Graduate School. 

Special Ruled Concerning Fellows and Scholars. Holders of fellow- 
ships and scholarships may be required to render some service to the 
* Discontinued during L919-20. 



Graduate School 15 

University and are not permitted, without the special permission of the 
Graduate Council, to do other work for remuneration. 

All fellows and scholars are exempted from the payment of Con- 
tingent, Library, and regular Laboratory fees. 

WATERMAN INSTITUTE FOR SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH 

At a meeting of the Trustees of the University on May 12, 1915, Dr. 
Luther Dana Waterman,* Professor Emeritus of Medicine in the Indiana 
University School of Medicine, presented to the Trustees deeds for prop- 
erty amounting in value to $100,000, on the following conditions: 

1. That he shall retain the management and income from the prop- 
erty during his lifetime. 

2. That the proceeds from the property be devoted to the estab- 
lishment and permanent maintenance of an Institute for Scientific Re- 
search. 

3. That the Trustees bind themselves to appropriate annually an 
amount of money for the Institute equal to the annual proceeds from 
the property. 

The Trustees accepted the proposal of Dr. Waterman in the follow- 
ing terms: "Resolved, That the generous gift of Dr. Luther D. Water- 
man to the University for the purpose therein stated be and is hereby 
accepted with the thanks of the Board. We hereby pledge the faith of 
the institution to carry out the conditions therein contained." 

At a meeting of the Trustees of the University in October, 1917, it 
was decided to inaugurate the work of the Institute at once. Arthur L. 
Foley, Professor of Physics in Indiana University, was elected Waterman 
Research Professor and given full time for the work. He served also in 
1918-19. (See Affiliated Research Professors, p. 9.) 



Died June 30, 1918. 



Courses in the Graduate School 



***In the following announcement of courses the Roman numerals I and II indicate 
whether a course is given in the first or second semester, respectively. The letters 
a and b used in a course number indicate which half (or semester) of the year's work 
is being- announced if the course is one which is given thruout the University year. 
University credit is reckoned in semester hours, indicated in parentheses by the abbrevi- 
ation "cr." 



DEPARTMENT OF ANATOMY 

Professor Myers; Associate Professor Badertscher. 

The following are the courses open to graduate students in the De- 
partment of Anatomy. 

13. Research Work. Opportunity for research work is offered to 
advanced students who may have at least one-half their time 
for one year free for the work. I, II. Hours to be arranged. 

Mr. Myers, Mr. Badertscher. 

15. Advanced Course in Anatomy. Open to students who have com- 

pleted the dissection of the human body, and Course 8. I, II. 
Hours to be arranged. Mr. Myers, Mr. Badertscher. 

16. Seminary. I, II. Days and hours to be arranged. (2 cr.) 

Mr. Myers, Mr. Badertscher. 



DEPARTMENT OF ASTRONOMY 

Associate Professor Cogshall. 

Graduate work in this Department is partially provided for by the 
Lawrence Fellowship in Astronomy, described on page 13 of this bulletin. 
Other work of a graduate nature carried on at the University is included 
under the courses described below. 

For a description of Kirkwood Observatory and its equipment see 
the University Catalog. 

13. Astronomical Research. I, II. Days, hours, and credit to be 

arranged. Mr. Cogshall. 

14. Orbits of Spectroscopic Binaries. II. Days, hours, and credit to 

be arranged. Mr. Cogshall. 

U6) 



Graduate School 17 

department of botany 

Professor Mottier; Associate Professor Andrews; Assistant Professor 

Van Hook. 

The following courses are open to graduate students in the Depart- 
ment of Botany: 

4. Morphology of Fungi. I. Daily, 1-3. (5 cr.) Repeated II. 

Mr. Van Hook. 

5. Plant Physiology. I. Daily, 1-3. (5 cr.) Pvepeated II. 

Mr. Andrews. 

6. Cytology. I. Daily, 1-3. (5 cr.) Mr. Mottier. 

5A. Research in Physiology. I, II. Days and hours to be arranged. 

Mr. Andrews. 

7. Research in Morphology and Cytology. I, II. Daily, at hours 

to be arranged. Mr. Mottier. 

13. Morphology of the Algae. I, II. Daily, at hours to be arranged. 

Mr. Mottier. 

18. Investigations in Mycology and Plant Pathology. I, II. Daily, 
1-3. Mr. Van Hook. 

21. Evolution and Heredity. A study of elementary principles; 

present-day views of Mendelism, natural selection, mutation, 
and plant improvement. Lectures and reading. Given in 
connection with Zoology 32 in second semester. II, and sum- 
mer session. At an hour to be appointed. Mr. Weatherwax. 

22. Research on Grasses. Problems of research on the classification 

and morphology of the grasses and on certain physiological 
phenomena that can be studied most advantageously in the 
grasses. I, II. Daily, 8-5. Mr. Weatherwax. 



DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

Professors Lyons, Davis; Associate Professors Brown, Mathers, May; 

Instructor Hale*. 

Special attention is given to inorganic, organic, physiological, and 
physical chemistry, and to electrochemistry, technical analytical chem- 
istry, and electrometallurgy. 

The graduate work of the Department of Chemistry, leading to the 
A.M. and Ph.D. degrees, comprises advanced laboratory, lecture, library, 
and seminary work in the lines indicated above, and special graduate 
courses described below. A thesis embodying original investigation is 
required for an advanced degree. 

Courses 50, 51, 52, 53 are offered in the summer session of 1919. 

* Absent on leave in the military service from December 1. 1917. 



18 Indiana University 

The laboratories for advanced work and the departmental library- 
are open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. There are no classes in the laboratories; 
each student works independently. 

19. Physical Chemistry. Laboratory work. I. Laboratory open 
daily, 8-5. Hours to be arranged. Repeated II and summer 
session, 1919. Mr. Brown. 

22 Electrochemistry. II. Lectures (A), M.W., at 8; laboratory 
(B), T.Th.F., 1-5. (22A, 2 cr.; 22B, 1 or more cr.) 

Mr. Brown. 

15. Advanced Technical and Engineering Analysis. II. Laboratory 
open daily, 8-5. Hours to be arranged. Repeated summer 
session, 1919. Mr. Mathers. 

32. Gas and Fuel Analysis. II. Lectures (A), T., at 1; laboratory 

(B), at hours to be arranged. (2 cr.) Mr. Mathers. 

33. Spectrum Analysis and Sugar Analysis. I (first thirteen 

weeks). Lectures (A), F., at 1; laboratory (B) , at hours to 
be arranged. (2 cr.) Mr. Mathers. 

26. Chemical Engineering. I. M.W.F., at 11. (3 cr.) Mr. Brown. 

14. Seminary: Inorganic Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, Electro- 

chemistry, and Industrial Chemistry. I, II. Th., at 7 p.m. 
Mr. Lyons, Mr. Brown, Mr. Mathers, Mr. May. 

50. Research: Organic or Physiological Chemistry. I, II. Hours 

to be arranged. Mr. Lyons, Mr. May. 

51. Research: Chemistry of the Alkaloids. I, II. Hours to be ar- 

ranged. Mr. Davis. 

52. Research: Electrochemistry, Electrometallurgy, and Physical 

Chemistry. I, II. Hours to be arranged. Mr. BROWN. 

53. Research: Inorganic Chemistry. I, II. Hours to be arranged. 

Mr. Mathers. 

24. Advanced Electrochemistry and Electrometallurgy. I, II. Lec- 

tures (A), F., at 8 (second semester); laboratory (B) , at 
hours to be arranged. Mr. Brown. 

25. Advanced Organic Chemistry. I, II. Lectures (A) , T.Th., at 11 

(first semester); laboratory (B) , at hours to be arranged. 

Mr. May. 

13. Elementary Metallurgy and Assaying. I. Lectures (A), M.W., 
at 8; laboratory (£), open F., 8-5. (3 cr.) Mr. Brown. 

29. Storage Batteries. I. Lectures (A), F., at 8; laboratory (B) , 

one or more periods a week. Mr. Brown. 

31. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. I, II, and summer session, 1919. 
Laboratory open daily, 8-5. Hours to be arranged. 

Mr. Mathers. 



Graduate School 19 

department of comparative philology 

Associate Professor Stempel. 

The graduate courses offered below will be extended as required. 
They may be supplemented by certain of the courses listed as under- 
graduate, as well as by certain courses given in the other language 
departments and in the Departments of Economics and Sociology (De- 
scriptive Sociology), History, Philosophy, and English. 

[5. Comparative Philology of the Classical Languages. I, II. 
M.W.F., at an hour to be appointed. (6 cr.) Mr. Stempel.] 
Omitted in 1919-20. 

4. Gothic. I, II. T.Th., at 11. (4 cr.) Mr. Stempel. 

[8. Sanskrit. I, II. M.W.F., at 10. (6 cr.) Mr. Stempel.] 

Omitted in 1919-20. 

[9. Old High German. I, II. T.Th., at 11. (4 cr.) Mr. Stempel.] 
Omitted in 1919-20. Given in alternate years with Course 4. 

[10. Middle High German. I, II. T.Th., at an hour to be appointed. 
(4 cr.) Mr. Stempel.] 

Omitted in 1919-20. 

[11. Old Icelandic. I, II. M.W.F., at 9. (6 cr.) Mr. Stempel.] 

Omitted in 1919-20. 

15. Seminary in Historical English Grammar. I, II. W., 2-4. 

Mr. Stempel. 



DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS AND SOCIOLOGY 

Professors Weatherly, Rawles, Phillips; Instructor Moffat. 

The following courses are open to graduate students in the Depart- 
ment of Economics and Sociology: 

3a. Public Finance. I. M.W.F., at 10. (3 cr.) Mr. Phillips. 

36. Special Tax Problems. II. M.W.F., at 10. (3 cr.) 

Mr. Phillips. 

9. Transportation. II. M.W.F., at 9. (3 cr.) Mr. Rawles. 

28. Insurance. II. T.Th., at 9. (2 cr.) Mr. Rawles. 

5. Advanced Political Economy. II. M.W.F., at 11. (3 cr.) 

Mr. Moffat. 

17a. Domestic Trade. I. T.Th., at 11. (2 cr.) Mr. Moffat. 

176. Foreign Trade. II. T.Th., at 11. (2 cr.) Mr. Moffat. 

12. Labor Problems. II. T.Th., at 9. (2 cr.) Mr. Phillips. 

20. Descriptive Sociology, (a) Social evolution. (6) Social assimi- 
lation. I, II. T.Th., at 10. (4 cr.) Mr. Weatherly. 



20 Indiana University 

4. Social Pathology, (a) Poverty and charities. (6) Crime and 

penology; child problems. I. II. M.W.F., at 2. (6 cr.) 

Mr. Weatherly. 

10a. Socialism. I. T.Th., at 2. (2 cr.) Mr. Weatherly. 

106. Methods of Social Reconstruction. II. T.Th., at 2. (2 cr.) 

Mr. Weatherly. 

7. Principles of Sociology. (a) Social forces. (b) Social effi- 
ciency. I, II. M.W.F., at 10. (6 cr.) Mr. Weatherly. 

30. Graduate Seminary. I, II. At hours to be appointed. 

Mr. Weatherly, Mr. Rawles, Mr. Phillips. 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

Professors Howe, Sembower; Associate Professors Stephenson, Reyn- 
olds, Greever; Assistant Professors Senour, Hale. 

The Department of English is prepared to offer research work lead- 
ing to the A.M. and Ph.D. degrees, in the following periods: Elizabethan 
Literature, the literature of the seventeenth century, of the eighteenth 
century, and of the first half of the nineteenth century. 

For the A.M. degree, the candidate should have had in his under- 
graduate work the equivalent of thirty hours of English, and should, 
in his graduate work, pursue a course restricted to three subjects, ap- 
proved by the Department. 

For the Ph.D. degree, the candidate will be expected to do at least 
two full years' work in residence after the Master's degree. He must 
be able to do a piece of independent research which will be acceptable to 
the Department. 

The following courses are open to graduate students in the Depart- 
ment of English: 

50. The Nineteenth-Century Romantic Poets. I, II. M.W.F., at 8. 

(6 cr.) Mr. Greever. 

51. Literary Problems. I, II. T.Th., at 11. (4 cr.) Mr. Reynolds. 

52. The Elizabethan Drama. I, II. T.Th., at an hour to be ap- 

pointed. (4 cr.) Mr. Reynolds. 

5:;. Shakspere. I. M.W.F., at 10. (3 cr.) Mr. Stephenson. 

54. Fighteenth-Century Problems. I, II. Two hours each week. 

(4 cr.) Mr. Howe. 

55. Nineteenth-Century Thought. I. Days and hours to be ap- 

pointed. (2 cr.) Mr. Sembower. 

56. The Ait of Poetry. II. Days and hours to be appointed. (3 cr.) 

Mr. Sembower. 

57. Literary Criticism. I. T.Th., at !). (2 cr.) Mr. Greever. 



Graduate School 21 

58. Browning. II. Days and hours to be appointed. (2 cr.) 

Mr. Reynolds, Mr. Hale. 

59. Social Forces in English Literature. II. T.Th., at 9. (2 cr.) 

Mr. Howe. 

60. Special Reading- Course for Advanced Students. Credit and 

hours to be arranged. Mr. Howe, Mr. Sembower, Mr. 
Stephenson, Mr. Reynolds, Mr. Greever, Mr. Hale. 

Dante (Fine Arts 7). I, II. T.Th., at 11. (4 cr.) 

Mr. Brooks (Department of Fine Arts). 

61. Problems in American Literature. II. Prerequisite, English 6. 

Daily, at 9. (5 cr.) Mr. Howe, Mr. Senour. 

62. Milton. I, II. T.Th., at 11. (4 cr.) Mr. Hale. 

63. The Poetry of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries. I, II. 

Days and hours to be appointed. (4 cr.) Mr. Sembower. 

64. Advanced Course in Expression. I, II. Days and hours to be 

appointed. Mr. Frazier. 

65. Special Writing. II. T.Th., at 10. (2 cr.) Mr. Sembower. 



DEPARTMENT OF FINE ARTS 

Professor Brooks; Assistant Professor Burke. 

The following courses in the Department of Fine Arts may count as 
graduate work on the Master's degree: 

16. The Plastic and Graphic Arts. A general introduction to archi- 
tecture, sculpture, painting, and the minor arts. A first view 
of the history and meaning of these subjects, in their relations 
to civilization. T.Th., at 10. (2 cr.) Mr. Brooks. 

2. History of Architecture. Lectures, with collateral reading, (a) 

Greek and Roman, (b) Medieval and Renaissance. The sec- 
ond semester's work may be taken without the first half-year's 
work. I, II. Daily, at 9. (10 cr.) Mr. Brooks. 

3. Sculpture, (a) Greek and Roman. (6) Middle Ages and Ren- 

aissance. The second semester's work may be taken without 
the first half-year's work. I, II. M.F., at 10. (4 cr.) 

Mr. Brooks. 

7. Dante. Lectures on The New Life and The Divine Comedy, ac- 
companied by the reading of both in English. I, II. T.Th., at 
11. (4 cr.) Mr. Brooks. 

10. Art Criticism. A seminary course in which the art criticism of 
Reynolds, Ruskin, Pater, Tolstoi, Coleridge, Symonds, Brown- 
ing, and Hazlitt is studied. I, II. Days and hours to be ar- 
ranged. (4 cr.) Mr. Burke. 

3 — 15021 



22 Indiana University 

department of geology 

Professors Cumings, Logan*; Assistant Professors Malott, Visher. 

The Department of Geology offers work leading to the A.M. and 
Ph.D. degrees. Opportunity is afforded for advanced work and investi- 
gation in stratigraphic geology and paleontology, and in economic and 
geographic geology. 

The following courses are open to graduate students in the Depart- 
ment: 

3. Economic Geology. I, II. M.W.F., at 8. (6 or 10 cr.) 

Mr. Logan. 

4. Advanced Historical Geology. I, II. M.W.F., at hours to be 

appointed. (6 cr.) Mr. Cumings. 

5. Systematic Paleontology. I, II. Days and credit to be ar- 

ranged. Mr. Cumings. 

7. Advanced Physiography. I. M.W.F., at 10. (3 cr.) 

Mr. Malott. 

10. Research. I, II. Hours to be arranged. 

Mr. Cumings, Mr. Logan. 

11. Seminary. I, II. M., at 4. (No credit.) 

Mr. Cumings, Mr. Logan, Mr. Malott, Mr. Visher. 

13. Advanced Field Work: Geological Survey. Days, hours, and 
credit to be arranged. Mr. Logan. 



DEPARTMENT OF GERMAN 

Professors Vos,f Osthaus. 
The following courses are open to graduate students: 

30. Studies in the Modern German Drama. I. M.W.F., at an hour 

to be appointed. (3 cr.) Mr. OSTHAUS. 

28. Journal Club. I. Two hours weekly, at an hour to be appointed. 

(2 cr.) Mr. Vos. 

22. German Seminary. II. Two hours weekly, at an hour to be ap- 
pointed. (2 cr.) Mr. Vos. 

27. Middle High German. I. Two hours weekly, at an hour to be 
appointed. (2 cr.) Mr. Vos. 

29. History of the German Language. II. Two hours weekly, at an 

hour to be appointed. (2 cr.) Mr. Vos. 

31. Research. I, II. Hours to be arranged. Mr. Vos. 



* Promoted from associate professor January 17, l«)li). 

f Absenl on leave from November, L918, t<> serve as special assistant ;tt the United 
States Legation a1 The Hague. 



Graduate School 23 

department of greek 

Professor Hoffman; Associate Professor Tilden. 

The time that may be at present profitably devoted to graduate work 
in Greek is one year, leading to the A.M. degree. A thesis on some sub- 
ject connected with the seminary work of the year is required for the 
degree. 

All candidates for the A.M. degree with Greek as major subject are 
recommended to take at least ten hours in Latin, in advance of the Latin 
taken in the undergraduate study. 

Courses 9, 12, and 13, or any part of these courses, are also open as 
minors to graduate students who have not already had as part of their 
undergraduate study the work which they take in these courses for grad- 
uate credit. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the Depart- 
ment: 

9. Lyric and Dramatic Poetry. I, II. Daily, at hours to be ap- 
pointed. (10 cr.) Mr. Tilden. 

12. Philosophical Prose. I, II. T.Th., at 10. (4 cr.) Mr. Hoffman. 

[13. Historical and Rhetorical Prose, (a) Herodotus and Thucyd- 
ides. (b) Demosthenes On the Crown. I, II. M.W.F., at 
hours to be appointed. t.) Mr. Tilden.] 

Omitted in 1919-20. 

15A. Graduate Seminary: 1'fc ides. I, II. Th., at hours to be 
appointed. (4 cr.) Mr. Hoffman. 

VqB. Graduate Seminary. Author studied to be selected. I. II. W., 
at hours to be appointed. (4 cr.) Mr. Tilden. 



DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY 

Professor Woodburn; Acting Professor Haworth; Assistant Professors 
Kohlmeier, McDonald,* Esarey. 

Candidates for the Ph.D. degree in history as major subject will be 
examined in each of the following fields: (1) ancient history, with 
emphasis at the option of the candidate on either Greek or Roman his- 
tory; (2) medieval and modern history, with emphasis on either the 
medieval or the modern field; (3) English history, with emphasis either 
on the period before 1603 or after that date; and (4) American history, 
with chief emphasis either on the period before 1783, or after that date. 
The examination on the special field of the thesis will naturally be more 
searching than elsewhere. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in this Depart- 
ment: 



* Absent on leave during academic year, 1918-19. 



24 Indiana University 

6. English Constitutional History from 1689. I, II. T.Th., at 11. 
(4 cr.) Mr. 



8. American Colonial History. I, II. T.Th., at 8. (4 cr.) 

Mr. Kohlmeier. 

9. Renaissance and Reformation. I, II. T.Th., at 11. (4 cr.) 

Mr. 



10. Modern Europe. From about 1750 to the present time. I, II. 
M.W.F., at 11. (6 cr.) Mr. Kohlmeier. 

16. Historical Method. I. T.Th., at 2. (2 cr.) Mr. Esarey. 

17. Historians and History Writing in the Nineteenth Century. II. 

T., at 6:15. (2 cr.) Mr. Woodburn and others. 

22. American Diplomatic History, 1776-1914. I, II. T.Th., at 10. 
(4 cr.) Mr. Kohlmeier. 

[28. Studies in American Constitutional History. I. M.W.F., at 3. 
(3 cr.) Mr. Woodburn.] 

Omitted in 1918-19. 

[29. Causes and Results of the Civil War in America. II. M.W.F., 
at 3. (3 cr.) Mr. Woodburn.] 

Omitted in 1918-19. 

30. Development of the American West. I, II. M.W.F., at 8. (6cr.) 

Mr. Esarey. 

20A. Seminary in English History. I, II. W., 4-5:30. (Credit 
as arranged.) Mr. 

[20B. Seminary in Modern European History. I, II. W., 4-5:30. 

(Credit as arranged.) Mr. ] 

Omitted in 1918-19. 

20C. Seminary in American History. I, II. M., 4-5:30. (Credit 
as arranged.) Mr. Woodburn. 

20D. Seminary in Indiana History. I, II. At hours to be arranged. 
(Credit as arranged.) Mr. Woodburn, Mr. Esarey. 



DEPARTMENT OF HOME ECONOMICS 

Associate Professor Wellman; Assistant Professor Sage; Instructor 

Daum. 

To carry graduate work in this Department, students must have 
completed the equivalent of twenty hours of work in this subject, or 
must make up the deficiency. The character of the advanced work may 
be varied according to the needs of the student and may deal with the 
scientific, the economic, the sociological, or the artistic aspects of the 
subject. 

Following arc the courses open to graduate students in the De- 
partment: 



Graduate School 25 

5. History of Costume and Costume Design. Prerequisite, Fine 
Arts 14. I. Daily, 10-12. (5 cr.) Miss Sage. 

14. Pietetics and Food Chemistry. Prerequisites, Home Economics 

10 or 11, 12 (is prerequisite or parallel), Chemistry 3C. I, II. 
M.W.F., 10-12. (6 cr.) Miss Wellman. 

16. Foods III. Prerequisite, Home Economics 14. I, II. T.Th., 

8-10. (4 cr.) Miss Daum. 

25. Evolution of the Home. I, II. M.W.F., at 3. (6 cr.) 

Miss Wellman. 

26. Economics of the Family. I, II. T.Th., at 11. (4 cr.) 

Miss Daum. 

27. Seminary. Hours and credit to be arranged. Miss Wellman. 

28. Research. Special problems. Hours to be arranged. 

Miss Daum. 

29. Women and Children in the Textile Industries. I. Hours to be 

arranged. Miss Sage. 



DEPARTMENT OF JOURNALISM 

Professor Piercy; Assistant Professor Wright.* 

To students who have taken twenty hours of journalism as a minor 
with a major subject in either English, history, political science, philos- 
ophy, or economics, the Department offers one year of graduate work 
leading to the degree A.M. At least sixteen hours of work in journalism 
are required, the other fourteen hours to be arranged for in consultation 
with the head of the Department. It is contemplated that a thesis shall 
be an important part of the year's work, and shall receive five hours of 
credit out of the sixteen. The subject of the thesis will deal either with 
some phase or field of country journalism, or with some special work in 
city journalism, the specialization being related, if deemed best, to the 
student's major subject when an undergraduate. 

2. Practical Newspaper Work (on the staff of The Indiana Daily 
Student). Editorial work exclusively. I, II. Daily, at hours 
to be arranged. (6 cr.) Mr. Wright. 

11. Advanced Course in Newspaper and Magazine Writing. I. T., 
3-5. (2 cr.) Repeated II. Mr. Piercy. 

20. Seminary. I, II. Consultation hours to be arranged. 

Mr. Piercy. 

21. Administration and Policies. I, II. Days and hours to be ar- 

ranged. (3 cr.) Mr. Piercy. 



Absent on leave in the military service during fall and winter terms. 



26 Indiana University 

department of latin 

Professor Stout; Associate Professor Berry. 

Students who begin the graduate study of Latin after having com- 
pleted an undergraduate course in the subject equivalent to that required 
of a major in the Department of Latin in Indiana University can com- 
plete the work for the Master's degree in one year. In special cases the 
work can all be done in summer sessions. The writing of a thesis is not 
required of all candidates for the Master's degree, but it is advised for 
those who expect to take additional work looking to the degree of Doctor 
of Philosophy. The work required for the Master's degree, while afford- 
ing an introduction to the methods of investigation, is arranged prima- 
rily to give a wider and more thoro acquaintance with the language and 
literature, institutions and history of the Roman people. It is hoped that 
this will meet equally well the needs of those who wish to become better 
teachers of Latin in the high schools and the lower grades of the college 
course, and of those who desire a proper foundation for the more ad- 
vanced study of Latin. 

The purely graduate courses at present offered, and those to be 
added, will be given in a series such as to offer opportunity for a three 
years' course of graduate study. Candidates for the Ph.D. degree whose 
major subject of study is Latin are required to make Greek their prin- 
cipal minor subject. A wide range of choice will be allowed for the 
second minor subject, the only requirement being that such courses shall 
contribute in some definite way to the principal work of the candidate. 
Every library resource required for investigations assigned by the De- 
partment will be supplied if not at present in the library. 

The Junior and Senior reading courses (Courses 33, 35, 41, 42) of 
the undergraduate work may be taken for graduate credit if certain 
additional work of graduate character assigned by the instructor be done 
in connection with them. The authors read in these courses are varied 
in different years, and thru a three years' period afford graduate stu- 
dents opportunity for a wide course of reading. 

31. History of Latin Literature. I. T.Th., at 9. (2 cr.) 

Miss Berry. 

33. Junior Reading Course. (a) Cicero's Tusculan Disputations, 
Book I, with collateral reading from other writers who reflect 
Roman thought concerning the destiny of the soul. (b) 
Plautus. Prerequisites, Latin 11, 14, 25, 26. I, II. M.W.F., 
at 9. (6 cr.) Miss Berry. 

[35. Junior Reading Course. Alternates with Latin 33. (a) Prose 

of the Empire. (b) Juvenal: Selected Satires. I, II. 

M.W.F., at 9. (6 cr.) Miss Berry.] 
Omitted 1919-20. 

41. Senior Reading Course. An intensive study of one or more rep- 

resentative authors with collateral reading of other authors 
in the original and in translations, and written reports on the 



Graduate School 27 

collateral reading. («) The classical historians of Rome, (b) 
Vergil's works. Prerequisite, twenty hours of credit in Latin. 
I, II. M.W.F., at 11. (6 cr.) Mr. Stout. 

[42. Senior Reading Course. Alternates with Latin 41, and is similar 
in aim. (a) Cicero: Orations. A number of orations will 
be read which are closely connected with the public life of 
the time or with the political fortunes of the author, (b) 
Readings from the Latin poets. Chiefly from those who are 
little read or not read at all in other parts of the Latin 
course. The selections cover all periods of Latin literature. 
Prerequisite, twenty hours of credit in Latin. I, II. M.W.F., 
at 11. (6 cr.) Mr. Stout.] 

Omitted in 1919-20. 

[51. Latin Inscriptions. A course to teach the use of inscriptions for 
purposes of investigation. Summer session. (2% cr.) 

Mr. Stout.] 
Omitted in 1919. 

[52. The Topography and Monuments of Ancient Rome. Studied 
from ancient and medieval sources. I, II. M., 3-5. (4 cr.) 

Miss Berry.] 
Omitted in 1919-20. 

[53. The Reign of Augustus Caesar. Studied from the sources. 
Summer session. Daily, at 9. (2% cr.) Mr. Stout. 

Omitted in 1919. 

[54. The Military System of the Romans. Studied from the classical 
authors and Latin inscriptions. Summer session. (2^ cr.) 

Mr. Stout.] 
Omitted in 1919. 

55. The Latin Romance: Saturae of Petronius, and Metamorphoses 
of Apuleius. A study is made of the origin, characteristics, 
and later developments of the Latin romance. I, II. M., 3-5. 
(4 cr.) Miss Berry. 

[56. Roman Provincial Administration. Studied from the classical 
authors and Latin inscriptions. Summer session. (2Mj cr.) 

Mr. Stout.] 
Omitted in 1919. 

57. Vergil : Works. A rapid reading of his works, with a special 
study of the epic and the pastoral as literary forms. Open 
to Seniors, graduate students, and qualified teachers. Sum- 
mer session. Daily, at 7. (2V 2 cr.) Mr. Stout. 

61. Seminary: The Letters of Pliny the Younger, (a) An intro- 
duction to the science of text criticism, based on the text of 
the letters of Pliny, (b) A series of studies on topics con- 
nected with the language and the subject-matter of the letters. 
I, II. W., 3-5, and another hour to be arranged. (6 cr.) 

Mr. Stout. 



28 Indiana University 

[62. Seminary: Political Problems of the Romans. I, II. W., 3-5. 
(4 cr.) Mr. Stout.] 

Omitted in 1919-20. 

[63. Seminary: The Roman Drama. Its development and tech- 
nique, and its place in Roman life. About half of the extant 
dramas will be read in connection with the course. I, II. W., 
3-5, and another hour to be arranged. (6 cr.) Mr. Stout.] 
Omitted in 1919-20. 



DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

Professors Davisson, Rothrock*; Associate Professor Hanna; Assistant 
Professor WiLLiAMSf; Instructor DantzigJ. 

The graduate courses at present offered by the Department of Math- 
ematics lead to the A.M. and Ph.D. degrees. 

A student wishing to secure the Doctor's degree with mathematics as 
major subject must, early in his graduate career, designate one of the 
following main divisions of mathematics as his specially chosen field: 
(1) arithmetic and algebra; (2) calculus and theory of functions; (3) 
geometry; (4) applied mathematics. In his specially chosen field, the 
candidate must present an acceptable thesis, showing an original treat- 
ment and giving evidence of original research, and be examined in three 
of the fields enumerated above. 

The library of the Department, consisting of about 2,500 bound vol- 
umes, is located in Room 36, Wylie Hall. The library is open from 8 
a.m. to 10 p.m., for use by students pursuing advanced work in math- 
ematics. 

The following courses are offered for properly qualified students. 
Days, hours, and credit will be arranged. 

21. Theory of Functions. Mr. Rothrock. 

39. Theory of Invariants. Mr. Hanna. 

30. Differential Geometry. Mr. Davisson. 

44. Non-Euclidean Geometry. Mr. Davisson. 

[26. Projective Geometry. Mr. Davisson.] 

Omitted in 1919-20. 

32. Theory of Numbers. Mr. Hanna. 

45. Calculus of Variations. Mr. Rothrock. 

51. Lineai- Differential Equations. Mr. Williams. 

55. Theory of Transformations. Mr. Dantzig. 

20. Mathematical Reading and Research. Professors DAVISSON, 

ROTHROCK; Associate Professor Hanna; Assistant Professor 
Williams; Instructor Dantzig. 



Absent on l<;iv<- during the General Assembly, 1919. 
• Ah en1 on leave in the military service. 
.; Ai. r „i. <„] leave from Augusl L, L918. Resigned April 7, 1919. 



Graduate School 29 

department of philosophy 

President Bryan ; Professors Book, Elkin ; Acting Professor Will- 
iams* ; Research Assistant Pressey. 

The graduate courses offered by the Department are intended pri- 
marily for advanced students who wish to prepare themselves to be- 
come advertising* or employment managers, social service workers, physi- 
cians, lawyers, teachers, supervisors or educational administrators, spe- 
cialists in psychology and philosophy, or who wish to engage in educa- 
tional research. The courses lead to the A.M. and Ph.D. degrees. 
Special problems will be arranged in psychology for those desiring to do 
advanced work in the field of technical and applied psychology. 

The following courses are now offered and are open to graduate 
students in the Department: 

[35. Modern Idealism. I, II. T.Th., at 10. (4 cr.) Mr. Elkin.] 
Omitted in 1919-20. 

36. Logic of Science. I. Two hours once a week, at a period to be 
appointed. (2 cr.) Mr. Elkin. 

5. Advanced Psychology. II. M.W.F., at hours to be appointed. 

(3 cr.) Mr. BOOK. 

[la. Comparative Psychology. I. M.W.F., at 11. (3 cr.) 

Mr. Book.1 
Omitted in 1919-20. 

30. Seminary in Philosophy. I, II. Two hours a week, at hours to 
be appointed. Mr. Elkin. 

34. Psychological Seminary. I, II- Two hours a week, at hours to 
be appointed. Mr. Book. 

8. Psychological Research. I, II. At hours to be arranged. 

Mr. Book. 

40. Psychology of Learning and of Work. Given in conjunction 
with Education 176. II. M.W.F., at 11. (3 cr.) Mr. Book. 

33. Mental Development. Given in conjunction with Education 17a. 
I. M.W.F., at 11. (3 cr.) Mr. Book. 

42. Mental Measurements. I, II. T.Th., at 9. (4 cr.) 

Mr. Pressey. 

39. Metaphysics. I. T.Th., at 10. (2 cr.) Mr. Elkin. 

44. Business Psychology. I. M.W.F., at 10. (3 cr.) Mr. Book. 

6. History of Philosophy. I, II. M.W.F., at 11. (6 cr.) 

Mr Elkin. 



* Resigned Juno 12, 1919. 



30 Indiana University 

department of physics 

Professor Foley*; Associate Professors Ramsey, Dutcher. 

The graduate courses offered by the Department of Physics lead 
to the A.M. and Ph.D. degrees. 

The courses comprising the work of the first three years (thirty 
hours) in physics, also courses in photography, general laboratory work, 
the teaching of physics and physical manipulation, modern physics, and 
analytical mechanics (altogether forty-two hours) will be found listed 
in the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or in the University Cata- 
log. The following courses are open to graduate students, and to such 
undergraduates as may be prepared to take them: 

16. Spectroscopy. I, II. T.Th., at 2. (4 cr.) Mr. Ramsey. 

18. Applied Electricity and Dynamo-Electric Machinery. I. Days 
and hours to be arranged. (3 cr.) Mr. Ramsey. 

20. Electric Waves. II. T.Th., at 2. (2 cr.) Mr. Dutcher. 

22. The Conduction of Electricity thru Gases, Radio-activity, Elec- 
tron Theory. II. Days and hours to be arranged. (3 cr.) 

Mr. Ramsey. 

29. Differential Equations in Physics. I. M.W.F., at 8. (3 cr.) 

Mr. Ramsey. 

[31. Thermodynamics. I. T.Th., at 8. (2 cr.) Mr. .] 

Omitted in 1918-19. 

33. Physical Optics. I, II. T.Th., at 9. (4 cr.) Mr. Dutcher. 

[35. Advanced Mathematical Electricity. I, II. T.Th., at 9. (4 cr.) 

^ . , . Mr. Ramsey.] 

Omitted in 1918-19. 

37. Current Physical Literature. I, II. T.Th., at 10. (4 cr.) 

Mr. Ramsey. 

39. Advanced Theoretical Physics. I, II. T.Th., at 11. (4 cr.) 

Mr. Ramsey. 

40. Advanced Laboratory Methods and Research. I, II. Days and 

hours to be appointed. Mr. Foley. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOLOGY 

Professor Moenkhaus; Assistant Professor Edmondson. 

The following courses in the Department of Physiology are open to 
graduate students: 

6. Advanced Physiology. I, II. Daily, at hours to be arranged. 

(Credit to be arranged.) Mr. Moenkhaus, Mr. Edmondson. 



Waterman Research Professor, 1!>I7-1!>. 



Graduate School 31 

10. Research. I, II. Daily, 8-4. 

Mr. Moenkhaus, Mr. Edmondson. 

11. Seminary. I, II. M., at 4. (2 cr.) 

Mr. Moenkhaus, Mr. Edmondson. 

DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Professor Hershey* ; Associate Professor Bates. 

The following- courses are open to graduate students in the Depart- 
ment of Political Science: 

5. Municipal Government. I. M.W.F., at 11. (3 cr.) Mr. Bates. 

[7. Legislatures and Legislation. I. M.W.F., at 11. (3 cr.) 

Mr. Bates.] 
Omitted in 1919-20. Given in alternate years with Political 
Science 8. 

8. Public Administration. II. M.W.F., at 11. (3 cr.) Mr. Bates. 

9. Social Politics, (a) The police power and labor legislation, (b) 

The regulation of commerce. I, II. T.Th., at 11. (4 cr.) 

Mr. Bates. 

11. Political Theory. II. T.Th., at 10. (2 cr.) Mr. Hershey. 

12. Problems of American Foreign Policy. II. M.W.F., at 10. 

(3 cr.) Mr. Hershey. 

13. International Relations. (a) Present-Day Europe. (6) The 

Far East. I, II. M.W.F., at 11. (6 cr.) Mr. Hershey. 

15. Public International Law. I, II. T.Th., at 1. (4 cr.) 

Mr. Hershey. 

16. Training for Public Service. I, II. Hours and credit by ar- 

rangement. Mr. Bates. 

21. Seminary in Government. I, II. Hours and credit by arrange- 

ment. Mr. Bates. 

22. Seminary in International Law and Diplomacy. I, II. Hours 

and credit by arrangement. Mr. Hershey. 



DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES 

Professor Hills; Associate Professors Morris, Mosemiller, Hill; 
Assistant Professor Scheifley. 

The following courses in the Department are open to graduate 
students. Besides the regular work of each course, additional collateral 
reading and special investigation may be required of graduate students. 



* Absent on leave from August 1, 1918. 



32 Indiana University 

Courses in French 

[32. Contemporary French Novel. I, II. T.Th., at 11. (4 cr.) 

Mr. SCHEIFLEY.] 

Omitted in 1919-20. 

33. Contemporary French Drama. I, II. T.Th., at 11. (4 cr.) 

Mr. Scheifley. 

[10. French Literature of the Nineteenth Century: The Romantic 
Period. I, II. M.W.F., at 10. (6 cr.) Mr. Morris.] 

Omitted in 1919-20. 

27. French Literature of the Nineteenth Century: The Realistic 
Period. I, II. M.W.F., at 10. (6 cr.) Mr. Morris. 

[24. French Literature of the Eighteenth Century. I, II. T.Th., at 

an hour to be appointed. (4 cr.) Mr. .] 

Omitted in 1919-20. 

[7. French Literature of the Seventeenth Century. I, II. M.W.F., 
at 9. (6 cr.) Mr. Hills.] 

Omitted in 1919-20. 

44. Comedies of Moliere. I, II. T.Th., at 10. (4 cr.) Mr. Hills. 

45. French Literature of the Sixteenth Century: From Marot to 

Montaigne. I, II. T.Th., at an hour to be appointed. (4 cr.) 

Mr. Scheifley. 

13. Old French. I, II. M.W.F., at an hour to be appointed. (6 cr.) 

Mr. MOSEMILLER. 

Courses in Spanish 

[37. Modern Spanish Novel. I, II. M.W.F., at 8. (6 cr.) Mr. Hill.] 
Omitted in 1919-20. 

51. Modern Spanish Drama. I, II. M.W.F., at 8. (6 cr.) 

Mr. Hill. 

38. Prose Fiction of the Seventeenth Century. With an especial 
study of Cervantes' Don Quijote. I, II. T.Th., at an hour to 
be appointed. (4 cr.) Mr. Hill. 

[52. Spanish Drama of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries. 
I, II. T.Th., at 10. (4 cr.) Mr. Hills.] 

Omitted in 1919-20. 

53. Early Spanish: Poem of the Cid. Spanish literature to the fif- 

teenth century. I, II. T.Th., at 10. (4 cr.) Mr. Hills. 

Courses in Italian 

61. The Works of Dante. Particularly the Vila Nuova and the 
Divina Commedia. I, II. M.W.F., at 9. (6 cr.) 

Mr. MOSEMILLER. 



Graduate School 33 

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SERVICE 

Director Henry. 

The Department is prepared to offer opportunities in research lead- 
ing to the A.M. and Ph.D. degrees. All of the work must be done in 
Indianapolis, but is subject otherwise to the rules which govern all grad- 
uate work. 

Study may follow practical, statistical, or scientific lines; but must 
include a thesis embodying original investigation. 

20. Research. Study of statistics and information gathered by the 
Department; or of conditions, in any part of the state, discov- 
ered in its work. I, II. Hours to be arranged. Miss Henry. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY 

Professor Eigenmann; Associate Professor Payne; Assistant Professor 
Scott; Instructor Stark. 

All work in the Department during the summer is done at the Bio- 
logical Station, Winona Lake, Indiana. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the De- 
partment of Zoology: 

30. Advanced Zoology. Individual work. I, II. Daily, 8-4. 

Mr. Eigenmann, Mr. Payne, Mr. Scott, Miss Stark. 

32. Heredity and Evolution. Given in conjunction with Botany 21. 
I. T.Th., at 11. (2 cr.) 

Mr. Payne, Mr. Weatherwax (Department of Botany). 

50. Seminary. I, II. Th., at 4. Mr. Payne. 

60. Research. I, II. 

Mr. Eigenmann, Mr. Payne, Mr. Scott, Miss Stark. 

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

Professors Smith,* Black, Book, Lee, Childs; Director Monroe. 

Graduate work is offered in the School of Education, and special 
programs leading to the A.M. and Ph.D. degrees, with the Master's and 
Doctor's certificate in education, will be arranged on application. 

A student whose undergraduate major was in the College of Liberal 
Arts will usually be given opportunity to do in one year the work for the 
A.M. degree in education. The work will include such undergraduate 
courses in education as may be necessary as a basis for the graduate 
work. 

The courses of the summer sessions are so arranged that graduate 
students in the School of Education may complete the work for the 
Master's degree in summer sessions. 

* Absent on leave from September, 1918, to September, 1919. 



34 Indiana University 

Graduate students in the School of Education may, by special ar- 
rangement, complete the work for two-thirds of a semester in the sum- 
mer session of 1919 by remaining until August 22. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in the School : 

6. History of Education, (a) Ancient and medieval periods. (6) 
Modern European and American systems. I, II. M.W.F., at 
9. (6 cr.) Mr. Childs. 

10. Philosophy of Education. I, II. M.W.F., at 10. (6 cr.) 

Mr. Black. 

12. Advanced Course in High School Problems, («) High school 
supervision. (6) The high school curriculum. Open to Se- 
niors and graduate students with teaching experience or who 
have had Education 1 and 3 or their equivalent. Intended for 
principals and teachers of experience who are preparing for 
high school administration. I, II. T.Th., at 11. Mr. Childs. 

15. School Administration, (a) General view of the field of school 

administration. (6) Intensive study of certain phases of 
school administration with special attention given to types of 
school surveys. I, II. M.W.F., at 9. (6 cr.) Mr. Smith. 

17a. Mental Development. Given in conjunction with Philosophy 33. 
I. M.W.F., at 11. (3 cr.) Mr. Book. 

176. Psychology of Learning and of Work. Given in conjunction 
with Philosophy 40. II. M.W.F., at 11. (3 cr.) Mr. Book. 

9. Measurement of Intelligence. I, II. T.Th., at 9. (4 cr.) 

Mr. Book. 

19. Rural Education. I, II. M.W.F., at 9. (6 cr.) Mr. Black. 

20. The Theory and Administration of Vocational Education. I, II. 

M.W.F., at 8. (6 cr.) Mr. Lee. 

21. Vocational Guidance. I, II. T.Th., at 8. (4 cr.) Mr. Lee. 

22. Vocational Surveys. Designed for superintendents, principals, 

and directors of vocational education. I, II. M.W.F., at 9. 
(6 cr.) Mr. Lee. 

23. Educational Measurements. II. T.Th., at 10. Mr. Monroe. 

26. Methods in Educational Research. I. M.W.F. Hours to be ar- 
ranged. (3 cr.) Mr. MONROE. 

16#. Seminary in School Administration. I. M., at 4. Mr. Smith. 

16C. Seminary in Elementary Education. The topic for discussion 
will be The Pedagogy of the Bible. I. M., 4-6. Mr. Black. 

16P. Seminary in Secondary Education. I. T., 7-9. Mr. Childs. 

16F. Seminary in Vocational Education. I, II. Time to be arranged. 

Mr. Lee. 



Graduate School 35 

18/?. Research: School Administration. I, II. Hours to be arranged. 

Mr. Smith. 

18C. Research: Elementary Education. I, II. Hours to be arranged. 

Mr. Black. 

18Z). Research: Secondary Education. I, II. Hours to be arranged. 

Mr. Childs. 

187?. Research: Educational Psychology. I, II. Hours to be ar- 
ranged. Mr. Book. 

18F. Research: Vocational Education. I, II. Hours to be arranged. 

Mr. Lee. 

18G. Research: Educational Measurements. I, II. Hours to be ar- 
ranged. Mr. Monroe. 



Students in Graduate School, 1918-19 



***The following list includes all graduate students who were in attendance in the summer session 
of 1918, and the academic year of 1918-19. The different terms are indicated by "s", "1", "2", "3", 
respectively. 



Chemistry Anderson. 



Aldred, Jacob William Huber (3) 
A.B., Indiana University, 1917. 

Allman, Hevman B (s) Education 

B.S., Tri-State College, . 

Andrews, Helen Hunt (1) Social Service. 

A.B., Butler College, 1917. 

Anderson, Flora Charlotte (1) Botany 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914; A.M., 1917. 

Asbury, Eunice (1 , 2, 3) English 

A.B., Indiana University, 1918. 
Barringer, Graham Andrew (1, 2, 3) .History 

A.B., Indiana University, 1918. 

Bawden, Frances Talmadge (1) Social Service Indianapolis 

A.B., Illinois College, 1911. 



Angola. 

Indianapolis. 

Crawfordsville. 

Coalmont. 

Bloomington. 



Geology Russiaville. 

.English Marysville. 

.Physics Sandborn. 



Beals, Colonzo Chelice (a, 1,2)... 
A.B., Indiana University, 1917. 

Beauchamp, Vater (s) 

A.B., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1914. 

Begeman, Hilda Lydia (1, 2, 3) ... . 

A.B., Indiana University, 1918. 

Benckhart, Marjoric Nold (s) English Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1913. 

Blank, Trma Joyce (s) Home Economics Bridgeport. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1916. 

Bolser, Claude Mathews (s) Journalism Newcastle. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914. 
Book, Hanna Mayme (s) Mathematics Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1905. 
Bourn, Frederick Edward (s) Education Stilesville. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1911. 

Bridwell, (Mrs.) Nelle Naftzger (1) . .English Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1910. 

Brothers, Chester Rodibaugh (2, 3).. Chemistry Goshen. 

A. B., Indiana University, 1918. 

Burlingame, Olive Dorothy (s) Latin Moores Hill. 

B.8., Moores Hill College, 1915. 

( !assidy, Emma (s) Latin French Lick. 

AH, Indiana University, 1917. 

Chapman, Edgar Kincaid (2, 3) Physics Crawfordsville 

\ B , Oberlin College, [903; M.S., Chicago University, 1910. 

( Hark, Cordelia (s) Music Franklin. 

M.I',., Franklin College, 1910. 
Clark, Reeta (a) English Clarkahill. 

\ B„ Hiram College, 1913. 
( *la vi on, ( Jlarenoe R (a) Education Bloomington. 

A.M., [ndiana University, 1917. 
< 'line, ( Jharles Valentine (a) Education I.eavenworl h. 

\ I'. , [ndiana State Normal School, 1916. 



(36 



Graduate School 37 

Cloud, John Hopper (2, 3) Physics Valparaiso. 

AH., Valparaiso University, 1896; A.M., Johns Hopkins University, 1918. 

Coleman, Margaret Faith (2) English Bloomington. 

A. 15., Indiana University, 1915; A.M., 1917. 
Cox, David Clark (3) Chemistry Madison. 

AH, Hanover College, 1916. 

Craven, Nellie Pearl (1) Latin Nineveh. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1911. 

Croninger, Fred Howard (s) Mathematics Fort Wayne. 

U.S., Heidelberg University (Tiffin, Ohio), . 

Culline, Fag Winfield (2) History Greentown. 

A.B., Indiana State Normal School, 1908. 
Culbertson, Kenneth Morton Latin Kokomo. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1916. 

Dalzell, Wilbur Jennings (1, 2, 3). . . .Physics Lawrence. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1918. 

Damn, Kate (1) Home Economics Lawrence, Kan. 

AH., University of Kansas, 1913; A.M., 1916. 
Denny, Martha Livingston (s) Zoology Terre Haute. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1917. 

Deane, Phena Ashley (1, 2, 3) Education Oaktown. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1918. 

Deputy, Mary Lois (3) English Kansas City, Mo. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1918. 

Dibell, Florence Ethel (s) Home Economics Wolcott. 

A.B., Western College, 1917. 
Dodds, Lucille Margaret (s, 1) English Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1917. 

Driver, Charles S (s, 1, 2, 3) Zoology Weyer's Cave, Va. 

A.B., Bridgewater College, 1916; A.M., Indiana University, 1918. 
Drybread. Dorothy (s) Home Economics Franklin. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1917. 

Eddingfield, June (s) German New Ross. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1906; A.M., 1913. 
Eggman, Carl Manson (3) Chemistry Pendleton. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1918. 

Ellis, Thomas Finley (s) Economics Bloomington. 

A.B., Valparaiso University, 1914; A.M., Indiana University, 1916. 

Esarey, (Mrs.) Laura Mills (1, 2). . .English Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1918. 

Evans, Chester Asahel (2, 3) Physics Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1904. 

Faulkner, (Miss) Kenneth (s) Chemistry Crawfordsville. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1918. 

Fisher, Elisha Lemnel (s) Education Leesburg. 

LL.B., Danville College, 1909; A.B., Indiana University, 1917. 

Folger, Thomas Harry (3) Zoology Columbus. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1917. 

Gaddv, Euclid Taylor (s) Chemistry Bloomington. 

A.B., Hanover College, 1916. 

Gardner, Robert Daniel (s) Education Angola. 

A.B., Tri-State College, 1915. 

Garner, Vance Nellie (s) French Brownsburg. 

A.B., Butler College, 1917. 
Gilmore, James Earl (3) Mathematics Monroe City. 

A.B., Indiana State Normal, 1915. 

Graves, Merle PClizabeth (s) History Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1911. 

Gregory, Mabel (s) English Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1912. 

Haggard, Esther Margaret (s) Home Economics Indianapolis. 

A.B., Drake University, 1917. 



38 Indiana University 

Hansford, Hazel Irene (1. 3) Psychology Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1913. 

Hawk, Frances Alma (1) Social Service West Lafayette. 

B.S., Purdue University, 1913. 

Hensley, Lulu Beecher (2, 3) Botany Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1917. 
Hepburn, Henrietta (1, 2, 3) English Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1916. 
Hepburn, (Mrs.) Luella Smith (s) Home Economics Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1917. 

Hess, John Ambrose (s) German Bloomington. 

A.B., Kansas University, 190S; A.M., 1910. 

Hiatt, Bertha Sylvia (s, 3) History Summitville. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1912. 

Hightower, Pleasant Roscoe (3) Education Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana Central College, 1914; A.M., Indiana University, 1917. 

Hoshaw, Nellie Gertrude (1) Latin Chalmers. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 

Howard, Inez Eulalia (s) Latin Lincoln. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914; A.M., 1917. 
Holdman, John Wesley (s) Chemistry South Bend. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914. 
Hudelson, Vista Margaret (2) History Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1917; A.M., 1918. 
Hughes, James Monroe (s) Education Sharpsville. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1916. 
Hull, Louie Rice (2) Physics Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914. 
Humke, Homer Louis (s) Education Noblesville. 

A.B., Tri-State College, 1916. 

Iske, Louise Marie (s) Philosophy Indianapolis. 

A B., Indiana University, 1910. 

Johnson, Thomas Covington (1, 2).. .History Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1917. 
Johnston, Mary (s) Latin Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1900; A.M., 1902. 
Jordan, Jacob (s) Physics Lafayette. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914. 

Katterjohn, Cecil Cornelius (s) History Huntingburg. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1918. 

Kelso, James Leon (3) Latin Bloomington. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1916. 

Kempf, Gerald Fidelis (2) Physiology Jasper. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1916. 

King, Elsie (s) English Union City. 

A I',., Indiana University, 1916; A.M., 1917. 
King, Florance Becson (1) Home Economics Richmond. 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1914. 

Leming, Bertha 0(1) Sociology Goodland. 

A.I'., DcPauw University, 1914. 

Lentz, Eli Gilbert (s) History Carbondale. 

Ph.B., Ewing College, 1912. 
Leg] or, Louis Hugo (2) Economics Evansville. 

A. IV, Indiana University, 1918. 

Leser, (Mrs.) Eedwig Gruen (2, 3)... Romance Languages. . . .Bloomington. 

A.]'.., Indiana University, 1919.* 
Luck, Mellie Gladys (s) Romance Languages . . . . Bloomington. 

A.I',., Indiana University, 1917. 

Lyon. Florence (1, 2, 3) Romance Languages. . .Delphi. 

\ B , Indiana University, 1816. 
Mc< June, Virginia Throckmorton (s).. Education Bloomington. 

A.P. , Butler College, 1017. 

•Work for a B. completed at end of fall term. Will be granted in June, 1919. 



Graduate School 39 

McElroy, Mart ha [sabel (s) Latin Newberry. 

AH'., In. liana University, 1918. 
McKown, Anna Gertrude (s) German Moores Hill. 

B.S., tfoorea Bill College, 1916; A.M., Indiana University, 1917. 
Maddox, Margaret Louise (s) History Otterbein. 

AM. Oxford College for Women, 1916. 
Malott, Hurt on Joseph (s) Geology North Vernon. 

A.M., Indiana University, 1915. 
Morrill, Madre (1, 2, 3) Romance Languages. . . Bloomington. 

A.M., Colorado College, 1917. 

Millikan. Kay Spencer (s) Education Lapel. 

A.M., Indiana University, 1915. 

Morley, Everett Emerson (s) Education Bloomington. 

A.B., Valpariso University, 1915; A.M., Indiana University, 1918. 

Myers, Mabele Taca (s) Latin Noblesville. 

AM., DePauw University, 1911. 

Millis, Robert Jordan (s) Anatomy Hanover. 

A.B , Hanover College, 1916. 
Murphy, Maurice Elgin (s) .Economics Clayton. 

A.M., Indiana University, 1913; A.M., University of Illinois, . 

Needham, Elza (s) Science Cortez, Colo. 

B.S., Valparaiso University, 1914. 

Nelson, Bertha Florence (s) Latin Fort Wayne. 

A.B., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1905; A.M., 1908. 

Nelson, Dotson McGinnis (s) Science Clinton, Miss. 

B.S., Mississippi College, 1907. 

Nie, Grover Martin (3) Physics Huntington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1911. 

Rowland, Edna Glover (1) English Indianapolis. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1906. 

O'Brian, Kathleen (s) History Edwardsport. 

A.B., Franklin College, 1916. 

Oehlkuck, Erna Irene (s) History Evansville. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914. 

Ong, Carrie (s) English Columbus. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1912. 

Orvis, Mary Burchard (s) Journalism Madison, Wis. 

A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1907. 
Painter, Carl Franklin (2, 3) History Middletown. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 

Painter, Floy Ruth (3) History Bloomington. 

A.B., Knox College, 1915. 
Papish, Jacob (s) Chemistry Bloomington. 

B.S., Valparaiso University, 1910; A.M., Indiana University, 1917. 

Phillips, (Mrs.) Honora Elder (1,2,3) Romance Languages. . . .Bloomington. 

A.B., University of Colorado, 1910. 
Piercy, Josephine Ketcham (s, 1,2,3) .English Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1918. 

Pitkin, Edward Meyer (2) Anatomy Bloomington. 

A.B., DePauw University, 1914. 

Pressey, (Mrs.) Luella Winifred 

(s, 1, 2, 3) Psychology Bloomington. 

A.B., Vassar College, 1916. 

Ramsey, Earl E (s) Education Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1902; A.M., 1910. 

Ragsdale, Munier (s) Romance Languages. . . .Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1917. 

Ratliff, Ryland Fletcher (2, 3) Physics Danville. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1900; A.M., 1904. 

Ray, Mary Estelle (s) Latin Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1911. 

Robertson, Mary Lucille (s) French Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1917. 



40 



Indiana University 



Rumble, Chester Arthur (s) Education. . 

B.S., Oakland City College, 1916. 

Schellschmidt, Olga (s) English. . . . 

A.B., Indiana University, 1909. 

Shannon, Fred Albert (s) History. . . . 

A.B., Indiana State Normal School, 1914. 
Skinner, Charles Henry (s) Physics. . . . 

A.B., Indiana University, 1913; M.S., University of Iowt 

Smith, Charles S (3) Zoology 

A.B., Indiana University, 1917. 

Smith, Harriet Ruth (s) German 

A.B., Indiana University, 1915. 

Sparkman, Collye Fredward (1, 2, 3) Education 

B.Pd., Valparaiso University, 1908; M.A., Clark University, 1911; 



Oakland City. 
Indianapolis. 
Reelsville. 
Fairmount. 



1916. 



Dillsboro. 
Bloomington. 



. . . Bloomington. 
Ph.D., New York University, 



Stempel, (Mrs.) Myrtle Emmert (3) .Philology Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1902; A.M., 1915. 
Stephens, Mabel Elizabeth (s) Latin Marion. 

B.S., Marion Normal College, 1912; A.B., Indiana University, 1016. 
Stone, William Herschel (s) Education Spencer. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1918. 

Stuart, Leona Eleanor (s) Home Economics Danville. 

B.S., Central Normal College, 1915. 

Thomas, Joel Bert (1, 2, 3) Education Danville. 

A.B., Swarthmore College, 1914. 

Townsend, Roy Weston (s) Education Warsaw. 

A.B., Butler College, 1915. 
Tullis, George Henry (3) Philosophy Bryant. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1919.* 

Uphaus, Willard Edwin (2) Education. . . .* Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1917. 
Utterback, Arthur W (s) Mathematics Winamac. 

B.S., Valparaiso University, 1912. 
Valentine, Roy Herbert (s) Education Newport. 

A.B., Moores Hill College, 1911. 
Ward, Jesse Lynn (s) Education Muncie. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1910. 
Wellons, Blanche (s, 2) English Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1914. 

Whinery, Smiley Massillion (s) Education Warren. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1916; A.M., 1917. 
White, Olive Rosalind (s) English Sedalia. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1918. 
Whitted, Estella Mary (s, 1,2) English Bloomington. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1901. 

Wilkinson, Clarence Edwin (2, 3). . . .History Rockport. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1918. 

Wrighl , Emerson Blaine (s) Education Bloomington. 

A.!?., Indiana University, 1913. *. 

Zimmerman Charles (s) Hi-lory *v#k North Vernon. 

A.B., Indiana State Normal School, 1912; A.M., Indiana Unf<crsity, 1916. 



* Completed work for A.K. (\vv;\w Mareh/^4, 1919^ dctfrb^ftull 1 

mencement. *^> ^ydf* 



be conferred at 1910 



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UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS-URBANA 



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